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Native Americans in United States History

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Audio Collection of Oral Stories & Tales

Margaret D. Jacobs, “A Generation Removed: The Fostering and Adoption of Indigenous Children in the Postwar World” (University of Nebraska Press, 2014) Margaret D.

Margaret D. Jacobs, “A Generation Removed: The Fostering and Adoption of Indigenous Children in the Postwar World” (University of Nebraska Press, 2014)

Jacobs View on Amazon In 2012, a young Cherokee girl named Veronica became famous. A Tale of Woe and Glory by Thomas Powers. The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky an exhibition at the Musée du quai Branly, Paris, April 8–July 20, 2014; the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, September 19, 2014–January 11, 2015; and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, March 9–May 10, 2015 Catalog of the exhibition edited by Gaylord Torrence Skira Rizzoli/Musée du quai Branly, 317 pp., $65.00.

A Tale of Woe and Glory by Thomas Powers

Infinity of Nations: Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American Indian - George Gustav Heye Center, New York. Throughout North, Central, and South America, Native nations have often been guided by leaders recognized for their abilities to maintain reciprocal relationships and to coordinate collective efforts through their oratory and judiciousness.

Infinity of Nations: Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American Indian - George Gustav Heye Center, New York

The right within a culture to don a headdress such as those shown here depends first on the acquisition of cultural knowledge and second on the ability to use that knowledge for the benefit of the people. These headdresses represent the right of Native peoples to govern and instruct themselves according to their own laws, customs, and prophecies. George Heye’s Legacy: An Unparalleled Collection The objects in this exhibition were largely collected by George Gustav Heye (1874–1957), a New Yorker who quit Wall Street to indulge his passion for American Indian artifacts. Over time, Heye gathered some 800,000 pieces from throughout the Americas, the largest such collection ever compiled by one person. Heye began collecting in Arizona in 1897. Edward Sheriff Curtis - an album on Flickr. Nancy Shoemaker, "Native American Whalemen and the World" (UNC Press, 2015)

Native American People (First Nations and American Indian Cultures) The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before : Code Switch. Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has designed a map of Native American tribes showing their locations before first contact with Europeans.

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before : Code Switch

Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption itoggle caption Hansi Lo Wang/NPR Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has designed a map of Native American tribes showing their locations before first contact with Europeans. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.

As a teenager, Carapella says he could never get his hands on a continental U.S. map like this, depicting more than 600 tribes — many now forgotten and lost to history. Carapella has designed maps of Canada and the continental U.S. showing the original locations and names of Native American tribes. First Light — Upstander Project. Stories of the Ages: Graceful Heritage - The Five American Indian Ballerinas. By Jenefar De Leon, Staff Writer During a 1982 interview, American Indian ballerina Yvonne Chouteau spoke of how her heritage had enriched her dancing.

Stories of the Ages: Graceful Heritage - The Five American Indian Ballerinas

"The Indian people are very artistic as a whole," Chouteau was reported saying in a New York News Service interview. "We are also very non-verbal, and so I think dance is a perfect expression of the Indian soul. " Although having differing Indian backgrounds, perhaps it was a similar spirit that helped propel five young women forward to enjoy and perfect their art and become known as Oklahoma's "Five Indian Ballerinas. " Zitkala-Sa photographed by Gertrude Käsebier, Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin,... Rosebud. Mourning Dove Soars: Celebrate the First Native Woman to Publish a Novel. She was taught to read with dime novels, and according to family legend was born in a canoe between 1884 and 1888.

Mourning Dove Soars: Celebrate the First Native Woman to Publish a Novel

Her name was Christine Quitasket, or Mourning Dove, as some may have come to know her from her pen name. Her novel Cogewea, The Half Blood: A Depiction of the Great Montana Cattle Range, was the first to be published by a Native American woman. The book is about a mixed-blood girl caught between white ranchers and reservation Indians—“the book combines authentic Indian lore with the circumstance and dialogue of a popular romance,” says a description on Amazon.com.

“Cogewea is a young, spirited, mixed-blood woman who has returned to her brother-in-law’s ranch in Montana from the Carlisle Indian school. According to HistoryLink.org, she told a Spokane newspaper in 1916 that she wanted to break down white stereotypes of American Indians. That article advertised the release of Cogewea, but the book wouldn’t actually be published until 1927. Cherokee_blood_why_do_so_many_americans_believe_they_have_cherokee_ancestry. Photo courtesy Carol M.

cherokee_blood_why_do_so_many_americans_believe_they_have_cherokee_ancestry

Highsmith/Library of Congress. Hitler’s Inspiration and Guide: The Native American Holocaust. While attending the annual Garifuna Film Festival held here in Los Angeles, we watched films about indigenous cultures, and saw the 1985 Academy Award-winning documentary Broken Rainbow, directed by Victoria Mudd, which discusses the history of injustice towards the Native American people.

Hitler’s Inspiration and Guide: The Native American Holocaust

The film talked about The Long Walk of the Navajo, which was the 1864 deportation and attempted ethnic cleansing of the Navajo people by the U.S. government. 8,000 Navajos were forced to walk more than 300 miles at gunpoint from their ancestral homelands in northeastern Arizona and northwestern New Mexico to an internment camp in Bosque Redondo, which was a desolate tract on the Pecos River in eastern New Mexico. Many died along the way. From 1863 to 1868, the U.S. Military persecuted and imprisoned 9,500 Navajo (the Diné) and 500 Mescalero Apache (the N’de). During the film I learned about something that shook me to my core that I had not heard before. David A. Parallels. Planting Truthful Seeds About Native Americans. “The truth about stories is that that’s all we are.”

Planting Truthful Seeds About Native Americans

–Thomas King, The Truth About Stories Current K-12 teaching about Native Americans tends to focus solely on the past—the long-dead past. Native American Actors Work to Overcome a Long-Documented Bias. Photo.

Native American Actors Work to Overcome a Long-Documented Bias

Manning: Native American Heritage Month: 6 Tips for Educators, Parents. On October 30, 2015, President Obama proclaimed the month of November as Native American Heritage Month. Madness Radio: Indian Country Psychology David Walker. The Human Cost of Keystone XL - Pacific Standard. In a Montana Greyhound station, Annita Lucchesi, a 24-year-old Southern Cheyenne woman, noticed an entire wall filled with photos of missing women. “The majority of them were native women and it broke my heart,” she says. Lucchesi works for the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Council. Because of her job, she knew that human trafficking around North Dakota’s Bakken oil fields was on the rise. But this wall was a visualization of the numbers she and her colleagues dealt with every day. In her office they were statistics; here they were her sisters. Lucchesi pulled out her phone and began snapping photos of the posters to share on social media. Boomtowns are rarely safe spaces for women.

“They were saying, ‘Oh yeah, North Dakota is the fucking best; in North Dakota you can take whatever pretty little Indian girl that you like and you can do whatever you want and police don’t give a fuck about it,’” Lucchesi says. That nightmare landscape may be about to grow.