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How to Start a Startup

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Co-founder conflict. Garry Tan Crunch Network Contributor Garry Tan is managing partner at Initialized Capital, a seed-stage VC firm.

Co-founder conflict

He was previously a partner at Y Combinator. Before that he was co-founder of Posterous (acquired by Twitter) and an early employee at Palantir Technologies. How to join the network Here’s how it felt in the weeks before I resigned from my last startup: I couldn’t sleep. This is the first public post in which I’ve ever talked about it, but through advising hundreds of startups, I’ve learned that my story is not uncommon. Every co-founder situation is different, but one common problem that keeps popping up revolves around how the founders engage in conflict: either not enough, or far too much. Being successful will mask co-founder problems Founder drama happens even in situations where you wouldn’t expect it to crop up. Posterous, the startup I co-founded in 2008, grew 10X yearly and became a top 200 Quantcast website in that time. Avoiding conflict. How to Use Thought Experiments to De-Risk Your Startup · Coding VC.

15 Dec 2016 "In preparing for battle, I have always found that plans are useless but planning is indispensable.

How to Use Thought Experiments to De-Risk Your Startup · Coding VC

" - Dwight D. Eisenhower In the early days of building a company, it's hard to step back and think about the bigger picture when there are always so many fires to fight or opportunities to chase down. That's a shame, because looking at your business from a 50,000-foot view often reveals areas of misplaced focus or resource misallocation.

How we turned $140k on Kickstarter into $40k in debt. And how we broke even. This is Part 3 of “Making The Contender: Conception to Completion”.

How we turned $140k on Kickstarter into $40k in debt. And how we broke even.

Here are links to Part 1 (how we made the game) and Part 2 (how we ran the Kickstarter). There are two big questions that every successful Kickstarter creator has to ask. We got them wrong. I’m John Teasdale. My friends and I created The Contender: The game of Presidential Debate. It did not have to be like this. Here are the two big questions, our answers at the time, and what we learned as a result. Daniel H Pink: employees are faster and more creative when solving other people's problems. Fewer than half of the participants in the first group figured out the problem.

Daniel H Pink: employees are faster and more creative when solving other people's problems

But in the second group, 66pc came up with the solution. In other words, people were faster and more creative when they tackled the problem on behalf of others rather than for themselves. This was no isolated result. Polman and Emich found the same phenomenon in two other experiments. In one, they asked participants to draw a picture of an alien that could be the basis of a science fiction story. Likewise, in a third experiment, the researchers asked participants to come up with three gift ideas – for themselves, for someone close to them, or for someone they scarcely knew. Polman and Emich build upon existing psychological research showing that when we think of situations or individuals that are distant – in space, time, or social connection – we think of them in the abstract.

Over the years, social scientists have found that abstract thinking leads to greater creativity. Begin with corporate governance. What I’ve learned from seeing 20k company pitches - Bringing transparency to seed investing... The Three Infrastructure Mistakes Your Company Must Not Make. When Avi Freedman was getting ready to graduate Temple University in 1992, there was no way to buy internet service in Philadelphia.

The Three Infrastructure Mistakes Your Company Must Not Make

Literally. If you wanted to send someone money to get a dial-up account, there was nobody to send it to. But Freedman had already been running public access Unix machines and letting people he knew log into them. So he decided to turn his personal frustration into a company that would offer dial-up Internet access to everyone in the area. Breaking a myth: Data shows you don’t actually need a co-founder. How are you, Jon?

Breaking a myth: Data shows you don’t actually need a co-founder

Just fine, Jon. Great, Jon. Let’s get this party started. Sure, Jon. We are often told that starting a startup on your own is madness. To ensure that I had the most useful and well-reported data, I limited my research to “successful” startups. The numbers in both cases vary slightly, but there are some strong similarities, in both cases re-confirming data from about 10 years ago, where a much smaller data set concluded that successful companies had, on average, 2.09 founders. Startups that have raised more than $10 million in funding My deep dive into the CrunchBase API gave me a total of 7,348 companies that have raised more than $10 million each.

This graph shows the number of startups that have raised more than $10 million from investors, broken down by the number of founders associated with the company. n=7,348 It turns out that almost half of the companies successful in raising funding did so with a solo founder. Startups that have successfully exited.

I Don’t Care How Well You Code, Understand Your Compensation — Hacker Noon. Jessica Livingston's Pretty Complete List on How Not to Fail · The Macro. For weekly re­caps of The Macro, sign up here.

Jessica Livingston's Pretty Complete List on How Not to Fail · The Macro

Here’s Jes­sica’s keynote from our third an­nual Fe­male Founders Con­fer­ence, which brought to­gether more than 800 women build­ing women-led star­tups. Jes­sica has seen over 1000 com­pa­nies go through YC and shares her learn­ings about what it takes to suc­ceed as a founder. She em­pha­sizes the im­por­tance of avoid­ing dis­trac­tion and mak­ing some­thing peo­ple want: Noth­ing else you do will mat­ter if you’re not mak­ing some­thing peo­ple want.

You can be the best spokesper­son, the best fundraiser, the best pro­gram­mer, but if you aren’t build­ing a prod­uct that sat­is­fies a real need, you’ll never suc­ceed. […] While I’ll tell you that it is going to be harder for you as a woman, it’s not going to be so much harder that it will make the dif­fer­ence be­tween suc­cess and fail­ure.