background preloader

State surveillance

Facebook Twitter

Meet Babel Street, the Powerful Social Media Surveillance Used by Police, Secret Service, and Sports Stadiums - Motherboard. After Geofeedia's highly publicized PR disaster, in which Chicago Police were found to have used the social media surveillance platform to track racial justice protests and gatherings, the social media monitoring company saw Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram cut off its data streams.

Meet Babel Street, the Powerful Social Media Surveillance Used by Police, Secret Service, and Sports Stadiums - Motherboard

Arguably the three most valuable API streams for social media sites, it would make sense for law enforcement to try and find an alternative software. A company called Babel Street, hailing from Reston, Virginia, might just be the answer. Newly released records from the Seattle Police Department indicate that in March of 2016, the agency acquired a two month trial run of Babel Street's Babel X software and Open Source Intelligence training. The purchase ran the department $6,500. The price of a one year Babel X subscription is $18,500, per a quote for the Army National Guard, which for some reason wound up in this SPD release.

Facial recognition - Copy

US access to ISPs data. WikiLeaks CIA access to devices. Police webcam. State surveillance privacy Freedom of expression. Omniveillance. NSA and GCHQ unlock privacy and security on the internet. NSA Surveillance and PRISM. Transit Bureau Officers Bust Notorious Graffiti Vandal. After months of compiling evidence, NYPD Transit Buereau officers closed a long-term investigation into 26 incidents of felony criminal mischief committed by a notorious graffiti vandal.

Transit Bureau Officers Bust Notorious Graffiti Vandal

The vandal, known by his graffiti moniker “CLYDE”, was responsible for approximately $23,000 of damage to subway cars throughout the City. Detective Navarra spearheaded the case and worked in conjunction with ADA Michael Bravner of the Queens County District Attorney’s Office to obtain a search warrant. FBI will Monitor Social Media using Crawl Application. FBI will Monitor Social Media using Crawl Application The Federal Bureau of Investigation is looking for a better way to spy on Facebook and Twitter users.

FBI will Monitor Social Media using Crawl Application

The Bureau is asking companies to build software that can effectively scan social media online for significant words, phrases and behavior so that agents can respond.A paper posted on the FBI website asks for companies to build programs that will map sentiment and wrongdoing. Police told to delete on request millions of images of innocent people. The home secretary has ordered police forces to delete on request millions of images of innocent people unlawfully retained on a searchable national police database.

Police told to delete on request millions of images of innocent people

A Home Office review published on Friday found that police forces make extensive use of more than 19m pictures and videos, known as custody images, of people they have arrested or questioned on the police national database. Despite a high court ruling in 2012 that keeping images of innocent people was unlawful, police forces have quietly continued to build up a massive database without any of the controls or privacy safeguards that apply to police DNA and fingerprint databases. The review, ordered by ministers in the wake of the high court ruling, found five years ago that more than 16m images had been enrolled in the facial recognition gallery on the police national database making it possible to search them using facial recognition technology.

“We don’t need wishy-washy recommendations. TSA to remove controversial X-ray scanners due to privacy concerns. 12 min ago | ChinaTechNews.com Alibaba Throws Money At Internet Privacy Hu Xiaoming, Alibaba's vice president for small- and micro-financial group and chief risk officer, announced in Beijing that the company will invest CNY40 million to establish a security fund.

TSA to remove controversial X-ray scanners due to privacy concerns

Trending on the Topix Network. A Senator Will Introduce Legislation Requiring Warrants Before Phones Can Be Searched At The US Border - BuzzFeed News. Man jailed 16 months, and counting, for refusing to decrypt hard drives. Francis Rawls, a former Philadelphia police sergeant, has been in the Philadelphia Federal Detention Center for more than 16 months.

Man jailed 16 months, and counting, for refusing to decrypt hard drives

His crime: the fired police officer has been found in contempt of court for refusing a judge's order to unlock two hard drives the authorities believe contain child pornography. Theoretically, Rawls can remain jailed indefinitely until he complies. I’ll never bring my phone on an international flight again. Neither should you. A few months ago I wrote about how you can encrypt your entire life in less than an hour.

I’ll never bring my phone on an international flight again. Neither should you.

Well, all the security in the world can’t save you if someone has physical possession of your phone or laptop, and can intimidate you into giving up your password. And a few weeks ago, that’s precisely what happened to a US citizen returning home from abroad. On January 30th, Sidd Bikkannavar, a US-born scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory flew back to Houston, Texas from Santiago, Chile. On his way through the airport, Customs and Border Patrol agents pulled him aside.

Un tour du monde des stations d'écoute. Under cover FBI agents on SM. Body scanner. Laptop search. Senate hearing mobile privacy. China to track cellphone users. State Police can suck data. Israel eardroping AlphaTelecom. O2 share your phone number? Leave Your Cellphone At Home, Says Jacob Appelbaum. Feds Patriot Ac location data. Under cover FBI agents on SM. Police webcam. Website to identify protestors from pictures.

New Passenger Name Record Directive, UK spy agencies 'broke privacy rules' says tribunal. Image copyright Thinkstock UK spy agencies broke privacy rules by collecting large amounts of UK citizens' data without adequate oversight, the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT) has ruled.

UK spy agencies 'broke privacy rules' says tribunal

Complaints about data collection by GCHQ, MI5 and MI6 were put forward by campaign group Privacy International. The ruling said some data collection did not comply with the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). But it added that proper statutory supervision was put in place last year. CIA: We'll spy on you through your refrigerator. UK government conducted illegal bulk data collection for almost a decade. The UK government conducted illegal bulk data collection and storage on citizens for almost 10 years, the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT) has ruled.

UK government conducted illegal bulk data collection for almost a decade

The case was brought by Privacy International and heard in the summer. The IPT said it was clear that the actions of the UK government in collecting bulk communications data (Bulk Communications Data) and personal information datasets (Bulk Personal Datasets) between 1998 and November 2015 were not legal under Article 8 of the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR).

It looks like we can’t show you adverts on this page, which may be caused by ad blocker software on your device. Because we rely on advertising to fund our journalism, please disable any ad blockers from running on V3, then reload the page to see the rest of this content. You can find more information about this here. More Fun with the Airline Screening Playset: Body Imaging X-Ray Edition! I’ve been following the recent controversy over the TSA’s body imaging X-ray machines, otherwise known as the “backscatter” or “exhibit-yourself-in-the-nude” devices.

More Fun with the Airline Screening Playset: Body Imaging X-Ray Edition!

It made me reminisce about an old post I wrote about the Playmobil airline screening playset. I had not used the playset for a while. Five long years have elapsed since my post, and I had outgrown this toy and moved on to more advanced ones. Met Police request for Oyster data scrutiny 'rises' The Met Police has made record requests for data on London commuters, a majority of whom use Oyster smartcards, the Green Party has said.

Transport for London (TfL) figures show the Met made 6,576 requests in 2010, but it was turned down 810 times. Noel Lynch, chairman of London Green Party, called for "rigorous safeguards to protect people's privacy". The Met said the rise in requests was due to the rise in Oyster usage as the data helps trace a person's movement. TSA Investigating ‘Don’t Touch My Junk’ Passenger. The TSA has launched an investigation of a passenger in San Diego who left the airport after opting out of an invasive body scan and criticizing the proposed alternative pat-down. John Tyner, a 31-year-old software programmer, recorded the encounter on his mobile phone and posted it to his blog. From there, it quickly went viral, tapping a groundswell of frustration over TSA’s procedures.

But far from backing down, the TSA told local reporters that it’s now investigating the passenger, who may face an $11,000 fine if the agency sues him. “What he’s done, he’s violated federal law and federal regulations which states once you enter and start the process you have to complete it,” TSA’s San Diego security director told the Fox 5 News. Tyner was at the San Diego airport last Saturday with his father-in-law and brother-in-law on their way to South Dakota for a three-day pheasant-hunting trip. You May Have 'Nothing to Hide' But You Still Have Something to Fear. This post was first published on MSNBC.com. In the wake of recent news that the NSA is spying on Americans, I have been particularly struck by the argument that "if you've got nothing to hide, you've got nothing to fear.

" At first blush, this argument might seem sound – after all, if the government is merely conducting anti-terrorism surveillance, non-terrorists shouldn't be affected, right? But if you look more closely, you'll see this idea is full of holes. The "nothing to hide" argument mistakenly suggests that privacy is something only criminals desire. In fact, we choose to do many things in private – sing in the shower, make love, confide in family and friends – even though they are not wrong or illegal. Internal audit shows NSA often breaks privacy rules, made thousands of violations a year. The Washington Post today published several big scoops related to the National Security Agency's surveillance programs. The paper's investigations were triggered by documents leaked to them "earlier this summer" by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. He has sought political asylum from a number of nations, and is currently in Moscow.

The U.S. wants to charge him with espionage for his revelations. Hundreds of Pages of NSA Spying Documents to be Released As Result of EFF Lawsuit.