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Image Gallery. Martian Rock and Dust Filling Studied with Laser and Camera Scientists used the Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover in June 2014 to examine a Martian rock "shell" about one inch (two to three centimeters) across, embedded in fine-grained bedrock and with a dust-filled hollow interior.

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This graphic combines an image of the target, called "Winnipesaukee," with spectrographic results from using ChemCam's laser on a row of points including the rock, the matrix around it and the material filling it. The image merges a high-resolution, black-and-white image from ChemCam's remote micro-imager and a color image form the telephoto-lens camera of Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam). The ChemCam laser and camera atop of Curiosity's remote sensing mast were about 9 feet, 10 inches (3 meter) from Winnipesaukee when the instrument examined Winnipesaukee on the 654th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (June 8, 2014).

Multimedia - Video Gallery. Mars Science Laboratory. What's^New?

Mars Science Laboratory

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