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A pioneer’s call to repopulate schist abandoned villages. Finds eroded shack, revamps it into heritage landmark home. Ben Allen completes overhaul of his own home in east London. Artworks by Olafur Eliasson informed architect Ben Allen's revamp of his two-storey maisonette in London's Bethnal Green, which features mirrored furniture elements.

Ben Allen completes overhaul of his own home in east London

The maisonette is set inside Keeling House, a 16-storey residential block that was designed by English architect Denys Lasdun in 1957. The founder of Studio Ben Allen and his wife decorated their home's interior with an array of personal possessions so that it looks like a cabinet of curiosities. Amongst these possessions are a number of optical artworks gifted by Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson, whom Allen worked for over a 10-year period. Several of the artworks are crafted from glass or mirror, and this prompted Allen to incorporate reflective elements in other spaces throughout the home. The architect was also inspired by the round convex mirrors that appear in London's Sir John Soane Museum, which playfully skew how visitors perceive the exhibition rooms. Photography is by French + Tye.

Project credits: Martin Skoček contrasts modern facade of House V with brick interiors. Salvaged time-worn bricks line the interiors of this gabled house near Bratislava, Slovakia, designed by local architect Martin Skoček.

Martin Skoček contrasts modern facade of House V with brick interiors

House V replaces a property that had been built on the site nearly 80 years ago, but over time had fallen into complete disrepair. "The structural analysis showed that the load-bearing parts were not in good condition to even consider reconstruction, so we decided to dismantle the whole house brick by brick," Skoček's eponymous studio told Dezeen. The new 185-square-metre home, which is occupied by a young family of four, has linear massing and a gabled titanium-zinc roof, emulating the shape of traditional agricultural buildings that dot the rural outskirts of Bratislava. It also has a smooth, white-painted facade and aluminium-framed windows. However, the studio didn't completely do away with the bricks that formed the structure of the old house – they instead have been used to line House V's interiors. Worn brick surfaces continue in the master bedroom. Timothee Mercier transforms rural French farm building into MA House.

Architect Timothee Mercier of Studio XM has converted a ruined farm building in France into an "intimate refuge" for his parents.

Timothee Mercier transforms rural French farm building into MA House

MA House is located in Vaucluse, a picturesque part of southeast France that boasts vineyards, lavender fields and quaint villages. It takes over an old farmhouse on a plot of land that architect Timothee Mercier's parents purchased back in 2001. Mercier's parents initially failed to obtain planning permission to turn the dilapidated structure into a home, so decided to build a property on a neighbouring forested hillside. The farm building sat deserted for a further 15 years before the local council agreed that a residential conversion could take place. The parents turned to Mercier to carry out the works. "More than a simple reconstruction, this house was imagined as a renewal," explained Mercier, who leads his own architecture practice, Studio XM.

Casa Flotanta by Benjamin Garcia Saxe Architecture is above a forest. A series of pillars raise the interconnected rooms of this house by Benjamin Garcia Saxe Architecture above the tree tops of the surrounding Costa Rican forest (+ slideshow).

Casa Flotanta by Benjamin Garcia Saxe Architecture is above a forest

The San Jose office of Benjamin Garcia Saxe Architecture was asked to design the family home for a steeply sloping site, and chose to lift the building off the ground to optimise views of the Pacific Ocean. Unlike nearby properties, the architects also wanted to avoid cutting into the landscape to create a flat piece of land on which to build. Studio Saxe. Dezeen Daily is sent every day and contains all the latest stories from Dezeen.

Studio Saxe

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For more details, please see our privacy notice. Dezeen Daily is sent every day and contains all the latest stories from Dezeen. LA couple builds backyard cottage, then moves-in from main home. Modern & Mayan craft inspire quake-proof homes, learning coop. 3-story container townhouse shines in street art vibrant alley. Apple architect picks a small prefab to savor CA countryside. Artist builds his Savannah studio with shipping containers.