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100th Meme Keys. Language in Life. Living Languages. Slanguage. Wrought with meaning. Idiomatica. I love english language | Just another WordPress.com weblog. Institute of Formal and Applied Linguistics. Onomatopoeia. A sign in a shop window in Italy proclaims "No Tic Tac", in imitation of the sound of a clock. An onomatopoeia ( i/ˌɒnɵmaːtəˈpiːə/,[1][2] or chiefly NZ /-ˈpeɪə/; from the Greek ὀνοματοποιία;[3] ὄνομα for "name"[4] and ποιέω for "I make",[5] adjectival form: "onomatopoeic" or "onomatopoetic") is a word that phonetically imitates, resembles or suggests the source of the sound that it describes.

Onomatopoeia (as an uncountable noun) refers to the property of such words. Common occurrences of onomatopoeias include animal noises such as "oink", "miaow" (or "meow"), "roar" or "chirp". Onomatopoeias are not the same across all languages; they conform to some extent to the broader linguistic system they are part of;[6][7] hence the sound of a clock may be tick tock in English, dī dā in Mandarin, or katchin katchin in Japanese. Cross-linguistic examples Uses of onomatopoeia Some other very common English-language examples include hiccup, zoom, bang, beep, moo, and splash. Cross-cultural differences. Pejorative. Name slurs can also involve an insulting or disparaging innuendo,[3] rather than being a direct derogatory remark. In some cases, a person's name can be redefined with an unpleasant or insulting meaning, or applied to a group of people considered by the majority to be inferior or lower in social class, as a group label with a disparaging meaning.

Also, an ethnic slur or racial slur can be used as a pejorative to imply people of those groups are inferior or deficient. See also[edit] Notes[edit] Further reading[edit] Songs in the Key of Life. How Y’all, Youse and You Guys Talk - Interactive Graphic. Lingua Franca. Language Learning. Body Language. The Center for Nonviolent Communication | Center for Nonviolent Communication. NVC Concepts. Nonviolent Communication (NVC) is sometimes referred to as compassionate communication.

Its purpose is to: create human connections that empower compassionate giving and receivingcreate governmental and corporate structures that support compassionate giving and receiving. NVC involves both communication skills that foster compassionate relating and consciousness of the interdependence of our well being and using power with others to work together to meet the needs of all concerned. This approach to communication emphasizes compassion as the motivation for action rather than fear, guilt, shame, blame, coercion, threat or justification for punishment. In other words, it is about getting what you want for reasons you will not regret later. NVC is NOT about getting people to do what we want. Nonviolent Communication skills will assist you in dealing with major blocks to communication such as demands, diagnoses and blaming. Nonviolent Communication Skills See also:

HOW DOES NONVIOLENT COMMUNICATION WORK? NVC offers many tools for connecting with others in ways that serve life. Nonviolent Communication can dramatically improve our relationships by helping us focus our attention on: Empathic understanding of others – without compromising our values, and Honest expression of our feelings and needs – without blame or judgment In NVC, we learn to hear difficult messages with compassion and to express ourselves authentically with the help of these four steps: OBSERVATION – what we observe that is affecting our well-being FEELINGS – how we are feeling in relation to what we are observing NEEDS – the values, dreams, and preferences connected to our feelings REQUEST – the concrete, presently doable actions we request in order to respond to our needs and enrich our lives These tools help create dialogue for resolutions that respect everyone.

NONVIOLENT COMMUNICATION helps -- We encourage you to learn more by reading Marshall’s book: Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Compassion. Lost in Translation: An Illustrated Catalog of Beautiful Untranslatable Words from Around the World. By Maria Popova The euphoria experienced as you begin to fall in love, the pile of books bought but unread, the coffee “threefill,” and other lyrical linguistic delights. “Words belong to each other,” Virginia Woolf said in the only surviving recording of her voice, a magnificent meditation on the beauty of language. But what happens when words are kept apart by too much unbridgeable otherness? “Barring downright deceivers, mild imbeciles and impotent poets, there exist, roughly speaking, three types of translators,” Vladimir Nabokov opened his strongly worded opinion on translation.

Indeed, this immeasurably complex yet vastly underappreciated art of multilingual gymnastics, which helps words belong to each other and can reveal volumes about the human condition, is often best illuminated through the negative space around it — those foreign words so rich and layered in meaning that the English language, despite its own unusual vocabulary, renders them practically untranslatable. Online Etymology Dictionary. Bung-hole (n.) also bunghole, "hole in a cask for a stopper," 1570s, from bung (n.) + hole (n.).

Sense extended to "anus" by c.1600. bung (n.) mid-15c., "large stopper for a cask," from Middle Dutch bonge "stopper;" or perhaps from French bonde "bung, bunghole" (15c.), which may be of Germanic origin (or the Germanic words may be borrowed from Romanic), or it may be from Gaulish *bunda (compare Old Irish bonn, Gaelic bonn, Welsh bon "base, sole of the foot"). It is possible that either or both of these sources is ultimately from Latin puncta in the sense of "hole. " Transferred to the cask-mouth itself (also bung-hole) from 1570s. tampion (n.) early 15c., "plug, bung," from Middle French tampon (15c.), nasalized variant of Old French tapon "piece of cloth to stop a hole" (14c.), a suffixed form of Frankish *tappo "stopper, plug," related to Old High German zapfo and Old English tæppa "stopper" (see tap (n.1)).

Rat-hole (n.) ullage (n.) bushing (n.) wormhole (n.) butthole (n.) pothole (n.) Hoyle. 7 Things Really Amazing Communicators Do. Praise versus Encouragement. Most of us believe that we need to praise our children more. However, there is some controversy regarding this point. If we always reward a child with praise after a task is completed, then the child comes to expect it.

However, if praise is not forthcoming, then its absence may be interpreted by the child as failure. According to Naomi Aldort, "Children who are subjected to endless commentary, acknowledgment, and praise eventually learn to do things not for their own sake, but to please others. " One of the main differences between praise and encouragement is that praise often comes paired with a judgment or evaluation, such as "best" or "highest" in these examples. According to Bolton (1979, pg 181): Evaluative praise is the expression of favorable judgment about another person or his behaviors: "Eric, you are such a good boy. " According to Ginott (1965): Evaluative praise.....creates anxiety, invites dependency, and evokes defensiveness. According to Taylor (1979): "Mr. "Bravo! Mr. Mr. A scientific guide to saying "no": How to avoid temptation and distraction.

2K Flares Filament.io 2K Flares × Learning how to say no is one of the most useful skills you can develop I found, especially when it comes to living a more productive and healthy life. Saying no to unnecessary commitments can give you the time you need to recover and rejuvenate. Saying no to daily distractions can give you the space you need to focus on what is important to you. And saying no to temptation can help you stay on track and achieve your health goals. In fact not being able to say no, is one of the most biggest downfalls that successful entrepreneurs claim as their own key mistakes.

But how do we actually get past the urgencies of everyday life and avoid distraction, so that we can focus the things that are really important to us? It seems like a big task, I wholeheartedly agree. How to Say No: Research Reveals the Best Way In a research study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, 120 students were split into two different groups. Here’s what happened: Verbal De-escalation Training—Calm Agitated Individuals in Your Care. CPI’s training programs focus on de-escalation techniques as a method of prevention. Communication is a key factor in the ability to de-escalate any situation.

The following article was written specifically for law enforcement professionals, but professionals in any field can better prevent crises and benefit from verbal de-escalation training in their workplace by using the five keys to empathic listening, as well as the five ways to remain in control of any situation. Communication is the Key to Crisis De-Escalation by Jerilyn Dufresne A difficult and potentially dangerous situation for officers involves being called to a scene and engaging with a person who may be mentally ill. Most individuals with mental illness are not dangerous, but a special set of skills is required to bring a mutually successful end to the encounter. Although an officer's inclination may be to intervene immediately, that may not always be the best response.

Allow a moment of silence. Related Resources. 6 Exercises To Strengthen Compassionate Leadership. Disney has been known for its litigious nature in the past, going so far as to change copyright law in order to keep Mickey Mouse out of public domain. That's why it's kind of weird that a movie filmed at Disney World, unapproved by the Mouse House, even exists at all. After making a splash at Sundance this year, though, the intriguing Escape From Tomorrow appears to be heading for a theatrical release--and the first trailer is now online. First-time director Randy Moore shot the film at the Florida theme park, guerrilla-style, over a series of visits with his crew and an unknown cast.

Details of the terms Moore worked out with Disney remain under wraps for now, but the controversial matter seems to be settled. While the circumstances surrounding Escape's production have dominated the conversation thus far, with the release of this trailer, perhaps talk will shift to the movie itself. ONLY THE BEST NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN QUOTATIONS Modern & Traditional Words of Guidance... "Wokini: Your Personal Journey to Happiness and Self-Understanding" Author: Billy Mills, Oglala Lakota (1938-) Publisher: Feather Publishing, 1990 ISBN: 0962794309, 9780962794308 BUY on amazon.com In my youth I respected the world and life, I needed not anything but peace of heart; And yet I changed despite myself and believed in Iktumi's lies.

He seemed to know all the truth, he promised to make me happy. He made me ask Wakantanka for wealth, that I might have power; I was given poverty, that I might find my inner strength. I asked for fame, so others would know me; I was given obscurity, that I might know myself. I asked for a person to love that I might never be alone; I was given a life of a hermit, that I might learn to accept myself. I asked for power, that I might achieve; I was given weakness, that I might learn to obey. I asked for health, that I might lead a long life; I was given infirmity, that I might appreciate each minute. I asked Mother Earth for strength, that I might have my way; Brain info during gestural communication 2010_SchippersKeysers_PNAS. How to Read Body Language to Reveal the Underlying Truth in Almost Any Situation.