Multitasking Bad!

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Multitasking while studying: Divided attention and technological gadgets impair learning and memory. Photo by Louisa Goulimaki/AFP/Getty Images Living rooms, dens, kitchens, even bedrooms: Investigators followed students into the spaces where homework gets done.

Multitasking while studying: Divided attention and technological gadgets impair learning and memory

Pens poised over their “study observation forms,” the observers watched intently as the students—in middle school, high school, and college, 263 in all—opened their books and turned on their computers. How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn? Using tech tools that students are familiar with and already enjoy using is attractive to educators, but getting students focused on the project at hand might be more difficult because of it.

How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn?

Living rooms, dens, kitchens, even bedrooms: Investigators followed students into the spaces where homework gets done. Pens poised over their “study observation forms,” the observers watched intently as the students—in middle school, high school, and college, 263 in all—opened their books and turned on their computers. For a quarter of an hour, the investigators from the lab of Larry Rosen, a psychology professor at California State University-Dominguez Hills, marked down once a minute what the students were doing as they studied.

Multitasking and Task Switching in the BCA Lab. Back to Projects Page | Back to Main Page In today's information-rich society, people frequently attempt to perform many tasks at once.

Multitasking and Task Switching in the BCA Lab

This often requires them to juggle their limited resources in order to accomplish each of these tasks successfully. Motivated Multitasking: How the Brain Keeps Tabs on Two Tasks at Once. The human brain is considered to be pretty quick, but it lacks many of qualities of a super-efficient computer.

Motivated Multitasking: How the Brain Keeps Tabs on Two Tasks at Once

For instance, we have trouble switching between tasks and cannot seem to actually do more than one thing at a time. So despite the increasing options—and demands—to multitask, our brains seem to have trouble keeping tabs on many activities at once. Multi-tasking adversely affects brain's learning, UCLA psychologists report. Public release date: 26-Jul-2006 [ Print | E-mail Share ] [ Close Window ] Contact: Stuart Wolpertswolpert@support.ucla.edu 310-206-0511University of California - Los Angeles Multi-tasking affects the brain's learning systems, and as a result, we do not learn as well when we are distracted, UCLA psychologists report this week in the online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Multi-tasking adversely affects brain's learning, UCLA psychologists report

"Multi-tasking adversely affects how you learn," said Russell Poldrack, UCLA associate professor of psychology and co-author of the study. "Even if you learn while multi-tasking, that learning is less flexible and more specialized, so you cannot retrieve the information as easily. How (and Why) to Stop Multitasking - Peter Bregman. During a conference call with the executive committee of a nonprofit board on which I sit, I decided to send an email to a client.

How (and Why) to Stop Multitasking - Peter Bregman

I know, I know. You’d think I’d have learned. Multitasking hurts brain's ability to focus, scientists say. Originally published June 6, 2010 at 9:18 PM | Page modified June 6, 2010 at 9:23 PM SAN FRANCISCO — When one of the most important e-mail messages of his life landed in his in-box a few years ago, Kord Campbell overlooked it.

Multitasking hurts brain's ability to focus, scientists say

Not just for a day or two, but 12 days. He finally saw it while sifting through old messages: A big company wanted to buy his Internet start-up. The message had slipped by him amid an electronic flood: two computer screens alive with e-mail, instant messages, online chats, a Web browser and the computer code he was writing. While he managed to salvage the $1.3 million deal after apologizing to his suitor, Campbell continues to struggle with the effects of the deluge of data. Scholars Turn Their Attention to Attention - The Chronicle Review. By David Glenn Imagine that driving across town, you've fallen into a reverie, meditating on lost loves or calculating your next tax payments.

Scholars Turn Their Attention to Attention - The Chronicle Review

You're so distracted that you rear-end the car in front of you at 10 miles an hour. You probably think: Damn. My fault. Is Multitasking More Efficient? Shifting Mental Gears Costs Time, Especially When Shifting To Less Familiar Tasks. WASHINGTON - New scientific studies reveal the hidden costs of multitasking, key findings as technology increasingly tempts people to do more than one thing (and increasingly, more than one complicated thing) at a time.

Is Multitasking More Efficient? Shifting Mental Gears Costs Time, Especially When Shifting To Less Familiar Tasks

Joshua Rubinstein, Ph.D., of the Federal Aviation Administration, and David Meyer, Ph.D., and Jeffrey Evans, Ph.D., both at the University of Michigan, describe their research in the August issue of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, published by the American Psychological Association (APA). Whether people toggle between browsing the Web and using other computer programs, talk on cell phones while driving, pilot jumbo jets or monitor air traffic, they're using their "executive control" processes -- the mental CEO -- found to be associated with the brain's prefrontal cortex and other key neural regions such as the parietal cortex. Media multitaskers pay mental price, Stanford study shows. Attention, multitaskers (if you can pay attention, that is): Your brain may be in trouble.

Media multitaskers pay mental price, Stanford study shows

People who are regularly bombarded with several streams of electronic information do not pay attention, control their memory or switch from one job to another as well as those who prefer to complete one task at a time, a group of Stanford researchers has found. High-tech jugglers are everywhere – keeping up several e-mail and instant message conversations at once, text messaging while watching television and jumping from one website to another while plowing through homework assignments. But after putting about 100 students through a series of three tests, the researchers realized those heavy media multitaskers are paying a big mental price. "They're suckers for irrelevancy," said communication Professor Clifford Nass, one of the researchers whose findings are published in the Aug. 24 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"Everything distracts them. "