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Mixing a MOOC with flip teaching in a traditional classroom - MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) Sergio Luján-Mora, Estela Saquete.

Mixing a MOOC with flip teaching in a traditional classroom - MOOC (Massive Open Online Course)

Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies (Edulearn 2013), p. 6480-6487, Barcelona (Spain), July 1-3 2013. ISBN: 978-84-616-3822-2. Abstract MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) have been around us since 2008, when around 2,300 students took part in a course called "Connectivism and Connective Knowledge", organized by the University of Manitoba (Canada). However, 2012 was widely recognized as "The year of the MOOC", because some MOOC initiatives, such as Coursera, Udacity, or edX, gained a world-wide popularity. In this paper, we present some lessons learned from our MOOC on XML (extensible Markup Language). Apart from the data gathered from the LMS, we conducted two online surveys to better understand how students learnt.

Firstly, students answered an online survey which goal was to measure the quality of the instructional material. Keywords: MOOC, on-line learning, quality assessment. "She Didn’t Teach. We Had to Learn it Ourselves.” Yesterday I got an email from a faculty member who had just received her spring semester student ratings (yes, in August, but that’s a topic for another post).

"She Didn’t Teach. We Had to Learn it Ourselves.”

She’d gotten one of those blistering student comments. “This teacher should not be paid. We had to teach ourselves in this course.” I remember another faculty member telling me about similar feedback, which was followed later with a comment about how the course “really made me think.” So, the criticism is one of those backhanded compliments. "She Didn’t Teach. We Had to Learn it Ourselves.”

An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie. Screencasting Feedback on Student Essays. Last semester I was faced with a larger-than-usual senior composition class for English majors—which of course also meant a larger-than-usual feedback load.

Screencasting Feedback on Student Essays

With a new baby at home, I was more than a little concerned about finding the time to do it all. Fully aware of the research (e.g. Ferris, 1997; Hyland & Hyland, 2006) that favors more detailed feedback on student writing (seems “awkward: reword” just doesn’t cut it), I could not in good conscience consider reducing the quality or quantity of the feedback I usually give.

Moreover, my feedback would typically include holding “writing conferences” (one-on-one consultations) with students—usually during office hours. But this was a big class, and there are just so many hours in a day. I knew something had to give. Having already tested the limits of the physical word, I turned to the virtual one. Blended and Flipped Learning Archives - Faculty Focus. June 15, 2015 Flipping Assessment: Making Assessment a Learning Experience By: Susan Spangler PhD If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you’re already aware that flipped instruction has become the latest trend in higher education classrooms.

Blended and Flipped Learning Archives - Faculty Focus

And for good reason. As it was first articulated by Bergmann and Sams, flipped instruction personalizes education by “redirecting attention away from the teacher and putting attention on the learner and learning.” Looking for ‘Flippable’ Moments in Your Class. “How do you determine what can be flipped?”

Looking for ‘Flippable’ Moments in Your Class

With all of this discussion around flipped classrooms, more instructors are asking this question and wondering when and where flipped strategies are best integrated into the learning environment. Certainly, some topics lend themselves more easily to flipped strategies than others, but every lesson plan has the opportunity for at least one “flippable moment.” This is the moment during class when you stop talking at your students and “flip” the work to them instead.

This is the moment when you allow your students to struggle, ask questions, solve problems, and do the “heavy lifting” required to learn the material. The Internet, online textbooks, online lectures, MOOCs, and other resources provide access to endless amounts of content, much of it free. Course Redesign Finds Right Blend of Content Delivery and Active Learning. Introductory courses are packed with content.

Course Redesign Finds Right Blend of Content Delivery and Active Learning

Teachers struggle to get through it during class; students struggle to master it outside of class. Too often learning consists of memorizing material that’s used on the exam but not retained long after. Faculty know they should use more strategies that engage students, but those approaches take time and, in most courses, that’s in very short supply. Half of Faculty Say Their Job is More Difficult Today than Five Years Ago. If you find yourself working longer hours or maybe feeling a bit more stressed at the end of the day, you’re not alone.

Half of Faculty Say Their Job is More Difficult Today than Five Years Ago

Fifty percent of college faculty who completed the annual Faculty Focus reader survey said that their job is more difficult than it was five years ago. Only nine percent said their job is less difficult, while 33 percent said it’s about the same. For those who find their job more challenging, the reasons are wide-ranging. Some mentioned larger classes or a heavier course load, while for others it’s keeping up with technology or a move to the online classroom that’s adding extra hours to their work day.

Additional committee work and administrative responsibilities also were mentioned frequently, as were budget cuts that have reduced the availability of resources and support. In a new question for 2013, we asked about specific types of courses or activities readers engaged in during the past year. How to Create Assessments for the Flipped Classroom. It seems like everyone is talking about the flipped classroom.

How to Create Assessments for the Flipped Classroom

But how do you use this new model to construct lessons and assessments that reinforce student learning? “Flipping” involves turning Bloom’s Taxonomy on its head. Instead of using class time to convey the basic information you want your students to remember and asking them to work on more difficult learning tasks alone, a flipped class asks students to come to class prepared with the foundational information and then to work on the challenging tasks of analysis, evaluation, and creation with others. Barbi Honeycutt, PhD, is the director of graduate teaching programs at North Carolina State University and the founder of Flip It Consulting. The Flipped Classroom: Tips for Integrating Moments of Reflection. “Students in inverted classrooms need to have more space to reflect on their learning activities so that they can make necessary connections to course content” (Strayer, 2012).

The Flipped Classroom: Tips for Integrating Moments of Reflection

If you were to observe a flipped classroom, what do you think would it look like? Maybe students are working in groups. Flipped Courses: A Few Concerns about the Rush to Flip. I have some concerns about flipping courses.

Flipped Courses: A Few Concerns about the Rush to Flip

Maybe I’m just hung up on the name—flipping is what we do with pancakes. It’s a quick, fluid motion and looks easy to those of us waiting at the breakfast table. I’m not sure those connotations are good when associated with courses and that leads to what centers my concerns. I keep hearing what sounds to me like “flippant” attitudes about what’s involved. In theory, I couldn’t be more supportive of the idea—it’s learner-centered from the inside out.

Flipping Assessment: Making Assessment a Learning Experience. If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you’re already aware that flipped instruction has become the latest trend in higher education classrooms. And for good reason. As it was first articulated by Bergmann and Sams, flipped instruction personalizes education by “redirecting attention away from the teacher and putting attention on the learner and learning.” Four Assessment Strategies for the Flipped Learning Environment. Flipped learning environments offer unique opportunities for student learning, as well as some unique challenges. By moving direct instruction from the class group space to the individual students’ learning spaces, time and space are freed up for the class as a learning community to explore the most difficult concepts of the course. Likewise, because students are individually responsible for learning the basics of new material, they gain regular experience with employing self-regulated learning strategies they would not have in an unflipped environment.

Flipped Classroom Survey Highlights Benefits and Challenges. Perhaps no other word has been as popular in higher education during the past few years as the term “flipped.” As a result, there is no shortage of ideas and opinions about flipped learning environments. Some faculty consider it another way to talk about student-centered learning. Others view flipped classrooms as an entirely new approach to teaching and learning. Ready to Flip: Three Ways to Hold Students Accountable for Pre-Class Work - Faculty Focus.

One of the most frequent questions faculty ask about the flipped classroom model is: “How do you encourage students to actually do the pre-class work and come to class prepared?” This is not really a new question for educators. Five Ways to Motivate Unprepared Students in the Flipped Classroom. In the previous article “Ready to Flip: Three Ways to Hold Students Accountable for Pre-Class Work,” I mentioned that one of the most frequently asked questions about the flipped classroom model is, “How do you encourage students to actually do the pre-class work and come to class prepared?”

A few days after the article was published, a reader emailed me to ask a follow up question. It’s actually the second most popular question I hear from educators. She asked, “What do you do when students still aren’t coming to class prepared?” The flipped classroom model—or any active, student-centered learning model—relies heavily on students being prepared and ready to engage in the learning activities.

If students are unprepared, then it limits what they can do, how deeply they can engage with the material, and how meaningfully they can connect with other students. Five Ways to Motivate Unprepared Students in the Flipped Classroom. Five Time-Saving Strategies for the Flipped Classroom. A few months ago, I heard a podcast by Michael Hyatt, a best-selling author and speaker who helps clients excel in their personal and professional lives. A Guide to the Flipped Classroom - Technology.

How to Create a Learning Video They’ll Want to Watch. Hiring Mark Zuckerberg to deliver a workshop or run a retreat is not always the most practical or cost-effective solution. Know what’s not impractical? Bringing thousands of today’s industry leaders and visionaries to your employees through short-form video to share the lessons they’ve learned through triumphs and failures in their own careers. This kind of video-driven thought leadership education is an efficient way companies can adopt to scale best practices from visionaries who are out there right now, setting the pace in every industry. But watching a TED Talk on creativity and becoming a more creative problem-solver at work are two different things. Flipped Classroom: Engaging Students with EdPuzzle.

The flipped classroom model is a blended learning strategy I use to present my vocabulary, writing, and grammar instruction online. Four Assessment Strategies for the Flipped Learning Environment. The Maryland Flipped Classroom Study. The Flipped Mastery Classroom in Action. Khan and Beyond: The Many Faces of the Flipped Classroom - Education Community Blog. Flipping the Classroom - Simply Speaking.

The Best Tools and Apps for Flipped Learning Classroom. July 25, 2014 Following the posting of "Managing iPad Videos in Schools" somebody emailed me asking about some suggestions for tools and apps to create instructional videos to use in a flipped learning setting. In fact, over the last couple of years I have reviewed several web tools and iPad apps that can be used in flipped classroom but the ones I am featuring below are among the best out there. 1- Educlipper Educlipper is a wonderful tool for creating video tutorials and guides to share with students. As a teacher you can create an Educlipper board for your class and share the link with them.

Now that you have a shared space with your students, you can go about creating instructional videos using the iPap app of Educlipper. Teachers' Practical Guide to A FLipped Classroom. July, 2014 Unlike the numerous graphics I shared here on the topic of flipped learning which were substantially theoretically based, the one I have for you today provides a practical demonstration of how Dr.Russell flipped his classroom . The graphic also features some of the activities and procedures he drew in his flipped instruction. Flipped Learning Network / Homepage. 5 Flipped Classroom Issues (And Solutions) For Teachers. The Flipped Classroom Model.

Aaron Sams: The Flipped Classroom. The Great Flipped Classroom Debate: Advantages and Disadvantages. The Great Flipped Classroom Debate: Advantages and Disadvantages Flipped Classroom (Photo credit: ransomtech) Perhaps the only thing in the field of education which never changes…is the fact that it is always changing! That is the very nature of education. These constant transformations are often accompanied by differing opinions and a lack of clarity which often takes a while to decipher. What one educator may see as a wonderful and groundbreaking idea or technique, others may perceive as totally without merit.

The intention of this article is to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the flipped classroom. Two Great Resources for Flipped Classrooms.