Buddhist Thoughts

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George Orwell: Politics and the English Language

Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English language is in a bad way, but it is generally assumed that we cannot by conscious action do anything about it. Our civilization is decadent and our language — so the argument runs — must inevitably share in the general collapse. It follows that any struggle against the abuse of language is a sentimental archaism, like preferring candles to electric light or hansom cabs to aeroplanes. Underneath this lies the half-conscious belief that language is a natural growth and not an instrument which we shape for our own purposes. George Orwell: Politics and the English Language
Bursting the Bubble of Fear The feeling that things are out of sync and that there is too much to do is not new. As Buddha pointed out over 2,600 years ago, we'll always have to deal with the fact that life entails pain and suffering. Perhaps it's that we don't really want to have any problems that makes Our current time seem so full of distress. Many people come to meditation practice with the expectation that it will calm them and relieve their stress. Certainly meditation can do this to some extent; even the most superficial meditation practices can induce feelings of calmness. However, when we're knee-deep in emotional distress, we're fortunate if we can remember to practice at all. Bursting the Bubble of Fear
Programs & Events Calendar Introductory Programs - learn to meditate - work with the basic technique, posture, thoughts and emotions, and integrate meditation into daily life. Core Path Programs includes Shambhala Training, the Shambhala School of Buddhist Studies, plus new curriculum courses. Buddhist Programs offer a path of practice and study from derived from Tibetan Buddhism with a strong emphasis on meditation. Study foundational Buddhist topics, such as karma, egolessness, and compassion. Programs & Events Calendar
From Chapter 13 of past Tricycle Retreat leader Ezra Bayda’s new book, Beyond Happiness, The Zen Way to True Contentment: We often look to relationships as a source of our personal happiness. Our relationships with our partners, friends, and family can certainly be enjoyable, and they enrich many dimensions of living. However, much of our unhappiness in life also comes from relationships; and strangely, even though relationships play a huge role in our lives, we are often very much in the dark when it comes to knowing why so much unhappiness is associated with them. Giving Through Relationships Giving Through Relationships
Teleseminar Audio Archives
Welcome to Integral Enlightenment! I’m delighted to have you with us in this exploration of what it means to live an authentic spiritual life in today’s world. You can listen to your Free Guided Meditation by clicking on the link below. If you would like to download it for a later time or transfer it to your iPod or other mp3 player, right-click or control-click and select "Save link as" or "Save Target as": FREE DOWNLOAD: "Opening to the Great Perfection" (50MB MP3 File) Integral Enlightenment - Thank You Integral Enlightenment - Thank You
Attention Means Attention Attention Means Attention THERE'S AN OLD ZEN STORY: a student said to Master Ichu, "Please write for me something of great wisdom." Master Ichu picked up his brush and wrote one word: "Attention." The student said, "Is that all?" The master wrote, "Attention. Attention." The student became irritable.
Looking Inward, Seeing Outward It is just within this fathom-long body, with its perception and intellect, that I declare that there is the cosmos, the origination of the cosmos, the cessation of the cosmos, and the path of practice leading to the cessation of the cosmos. —The Buddha, Anguttara Nikaya 4.45, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu Sometimes modern people misunderstand Buddhism’s focus on the individual human journey as well as its injunction to people to find out who they are and to seek their own ultimate fulfillment. With our Western suspicions of meditation, of looking within— and, frankly, our fear of being alone—not infrequently, we tend to reject the inward looking of Buddhism... Looking Inward, Seeing Outward
Alive Mind Cinema
Inviting Fear Inviting Fear Above all, a materialistic society desires certainty—it seeks to guarantee it; passes laws to enforce it; wipes our the pathogens that threaten it; and lets everyone have guns to protect it. Even the seemingly innocuous habits of inking in plans and clinging to beliefs and opinions are the reverse-image of the uncertainties that the heart yearns to be certain about. Yet, if we seek security in that which is inherently uncertain, dukkha, or discontent, is the inevitable result. Fear is a discomfiting friend.