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Motivating speaking activities for lower levels. Planning time has been shown to increase production in speaking tasks.

Motivating speaking activities for lower levels

Lower level learners often find it especially difficult to speak spontaneously, so these activities incorporate ‘thinking time’ during which learners can prepare for speaking by planning what they are going to say, and asking the teacher or using a dictionary to look up missing vocabulary. The following activities are relatively short, with minimal materials preparation time for the teacher. They are designed for use as a warmer or a filler in the middle or at the end of a class. Definitions lists This activity is good for activating existing vocabulary or revising vocabulary studied in previous lessons.

SPEAKING. Free English Listening Comprehension and Speaking exercises. ESL Dialogues. 10 Intriguing Photographs to Teach Close Reading and Visual Thinking Skills. Photo Updated, March 17, 2016 | We have published a companion piece: “8 Compelling Mini-Documentaries to Teach Close Reading and Critical Thinking Skills.”

10 Intriguing Photographs to Teach Close Reading and Visual Thinking Skills

Ever want your students to slow down and notice details when they read — whether they’re perusing a book, a poem, a map or a political cartoon? Young people often want to hurry up and make meaning via a quick skim or a cursory glance when a text can demand patience and focus. Closely reading any text, whether written or visual, requires that students proceed more slowly and methodically, noticing details, making connections and asking questions. This takes practice. We’ve selected 10 photos from The Times that we’ve used previously in our weekly “What’s Going On in This Picture?” 10 MORE NO PREP TEFL Activities - Traveling Banana. Wow!

10 MORE NO PREP TEFL Activities - Traveling Banana

Thanks for all the love everybody! What’s Going On in This Picture - The Learning Network Blog - The New York Times. Photo Students 1.

What’s Going On in This Picture - The Learning Network Blog - The New York Times

After looking closely at the image above (or at the full-size image), think about these three questions: Picture description. Describing photos (comparing, contrasting and speculating) You are going to practise language for; Describing photosComparing and contrasting photos (discussing similarities and differences)Speculating on what might be happeningReacting to photos (giving opinions) Discuss Look at the presentation.

Describing photos (comparing, contrasting and speculating)

Follow the instructions and talk about some of the photos Write The language used here for comparing and contrasting / speculating is also useful for writing discussion / argument essays. Plan: Introduction - describe the situation / topic to be discussedCompare / contrast ideas (for and against / advantages and disadvantages)Speculate on solutions to problems raised by the questionConclusion - give an opinion Which pairs or groups of photos in the presentation could be used to demonstrate ideas for argument writing topics about education, technology, food, family, work, leisure, health, advertising etc? 101 Conversation Starters. (Also see How to Start a Conversation) Ice Breakers Where did you grow up?

101 Conversation Starters

Do you have any pets? Debates, discussion & speaking activity lessons for esl teachers: eslflow webguide. Presentation Tools Online. Simple shopping. Conversation Questions for the ESL/EFL Classroom. If this is your first time here, then read the Teacher's Guide to Using These PagesIf you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. Home | Articles | Lessons | Techniques | Questions | Games | Jokes | Things for Teachers | Links | Activities for ESL Students Would you like to help? If you can think of a good question for any list, please send it to us. If you would like to suggest another topic, please send it and a set of questions to begin the topic. Copyright © 1997-2010 by The Internet TESL Journal Pages from this site should not be put online elsewhere.Permission is not required to link directly to any page on our site as long as you do not trap the page inside a frame.

ESL Discussions: English Conversation Questions / Debates: Speaking Lesson Activities. Asking and giving directions. Speaking Activities. On these pages you will find ideas for classsroom activities which involve speaking.

Speaking Activities

(These tips are taken on this site · Find the murderer · Bingo mingle · Short projects to get them talking - Lists · Superlative questions · Summer destinations · Interview the experts · Discussion bingo · Mini-talks · Erase the dialogue. ESL Discussions: English Conversation Questions / Debates: Speaking Lesson Activities. The EFL SMARTblog: Describing photos (comparing, contrasting and speculating) Taboo questions. Mobile. How to Come Up with Good Conversation Topics (with Sample Topics) Edit Article Basic Conversation StartersExtending the ConversationPushing BoundariesConversation Help Edited by Cheyanna1, Brandywine, Glutted, Ben Rubenstein and 113 others.

How to Come Up with Good Conversation Topics (with Sample Topics)

Ethical Dilemmas Archive. Language In Use. It is great to show and offer students many examples of English language in use.

Language In Use

Meaning, students appreciate that there are many ways to say the same thing and like to see the "nuance" of the English language. Here are some images showing different ways / expressions to communicate a similar thing. Might be handy. Also, view as a slideshow or you can purchase and edit in ppt. If interested in this kind of approach, you might be interested in my ebook "Get TALKing" which has 28 lessons all based around language chunks. Discussion-game.pdf. Dont_say_the_words_3. Speaking aids. Probably you agree that these little things make a lot of difference and it is with good reason why people spend time, money and energy to get the right small objects to help them put themselves and their loved ones into the right mood.

Speaking aids

Why use speaking aids Post-it notes Walls Coloured paper Small objects To control turn-taking As metaphors Conclusion Why use speaking aids In contrast, we often expect that our students have the right mood to speak without having anything that would help them to be in the right mood to speak, or any prompt that would help the flow of ideas.

These small prompts or small speaking aids get especially important when children get into the age when they want to speak about themselves more than e.g. about the little animals or fairies in a tale.