background preloader

Creativity in Schools

Facebook Twitter

22 Simple Ideas for Harnessing Creativity in the Elementary Classroom. (Updated 2/6/14) Here's an experiment you can conduct in many schools, maybe even the school where you teach.

22 Simple Ideas for Harnessing Creativity in the Elementary Classroom

Look through the door of one classroom and you might see the students hunched over, not engaged, even frowning. The teacher looks frazzled, tired and wishing he or she were somewhere else. Twelve Things You Were Not Taught in School About Creative Thinking. Education Week Teacher Professional Development Sourcebook: Reading Fiction Whole. Published Online: February 29, 2012 Published in Print: February 29, 2012, as Reading Fiction Whole English teacher Ariel Sacks believes it's important to lead students to make their own discoveries in literature.

Education Week Teacher Professional Development Sourcebook: Reading Fiction Whole

—Emile Wamsteker By Ariel Sacks Literary fiction is an art that seeks to create an immersive experience for the reader, but we often don't approach it that way with our students. Imagine walking into a movie theater and finding that the movie is switched off every few minutes. Yet, as teachers, we continue to segment literary works and erect barriers between students and their experience of fictional worlds. When I was studying to be a teacher at Bank Street College in New York City nine years ago, my advisor and children's literature instructor, Madeleine Ray, planted a different concept in my mind: Let students read novels in their entirety. I first tried this "whole novels" method as a student-teacher in Bank Street's own private lab school. Framing the project.

Creativity_in_Education. The Creativity Crisis. Anthony Browne on keeping creativity alive in schools. On a recent school visit I was greeted by a teacher who proudly informed me that the children at this particular school were two years further ahead in their reading compared with those in other schools.

Anthony Browne on keeping creativity alive in schools

I was impressed. Then I began talking to various classes. The children were indeed bright, articulate and enthusiastic, and keen to play the shape game, a drawing game that I always play in schools. It's a game that my brother and I thought we'd invented when we were small boys, but it seems that children play their own version of this game all over the world. It's very simple. All children seem to love playing this game, and they're very good at it - much better than most adults. But at this school I saw that the shapes the children were drawing tended to be very carefully drawn small triangles, squares and circles - "proper" shapes. I showed the same children images from my books, demonstrating how I've played the shape game in every book I've ever made. How schools stifle creativity. Are schools killing creativity?

Sir Ken Robinson: We're born with great natural talentsHe says schools systematically suppress many of those innate talentsSchools use testing and other systems to narrowly assess students, he saysHe says they devalue forms of creativity that don't fit in academic contexts Editor's note: Sir Ken Robinson, Ph.D, an expert in creativity, innovation and human resources, gave this popular talk at the TED conference in 2006. In this article he explores why the message has resonated with audiences.

Robinson is a best-selling author whose latest book is "The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything (Viking). " He received a knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II in 2003 for his service to the arts and education. (CNN) -- I spoke at TED in 2006, the year they started to put the talks online. I have a stream of e-mails, tweets and blog posts round the world from young people, parents, students, teachers, cultural activists and business leaders of all sorts. Ken Robinson says schools kill creativity.

3 Ideas to Prevent Schools from Killing Creativity, Curiosity, and Critical Thinking. As a kid, I grew up in an area on Long Island where the bodega across the street was off-limits, too dangerous for travel. My 6-year old rebellious mind didn't crave midnight motorcycle rides while swigging a bottle of jagermeister. Standing across the street with my twin brother, I could smell freshly baked rainbow square cookies and all I wanted to do was sit in an alleyway and munch on them until dusk.

Not much has changed....that would still be a good day. The junior high school had a metal detector and there were weekly stories of 13-year olds being shoved head first into a toilet while their clothes were stripped away. Try to find a principal or teacher that does not truly value creativity , curiosity, and critical thinking. If everyone knows what is being used to measure progress, expect corruption. If you want to steal a child's love of a topic, make it mandatory for them to follow precise guidelines of what they have to know and what is irrelevant.