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Gyalwang Karmapa Brings to a Close His Commentary on the Heart Sutra. The final session of the 17th Karmapa’s commentary on the Heart Sutra began with a brief explanation of the differences in the view of emptiness among the Middle Way (Madhyamaka), Mind Only (Chittamātra), and the Buddha Nature (Tathāgatagarbha) schools of Buddhism.

Gyalwang Karmapa Brings to a Close His Commentary on the Heart Sutra

The prajna paramita sutras, the Karmapa reminded everyone, are the root of philosophy of Mahayana Buddhism. All of its three main schools have their respective views of the four-fold emptiness and how emptiness and phenomena are related. However, the Karmapa cautioned, since all of them are teachings of the Buddha, it is not appropriate to say that one is superior to another.

Discussion on the 5 Aggregates - Zurmang Kagyud. Open Door Part Three. We went through the first and second analyses of what has come to be known as “The Five Reasonings of Nagarjuna” that were written in the 2nd century C.E. by the excellent Mahasiddha Nagarjuna, who founded the Madhyamaka School, the Middle Way School, meaning the middle way between assumptions that are either a fabricated superimposition or a denial.

Open Door Part Three

The middle view of Madhyamaka is sometimes referred to as Prajnaparamita, which means “Mother of all Buddhas” since it is the basis for realization. Only with perfect insight into the transcendent nature of Prajnaparamita - the Sanskrit term that was translated into Tibetan as Shes-rab-kyi-pa-rol-tu-phyin-pa (“Perfection of Wisdom”) - can freedom from samsara be attained and nirvana be realized. The Mother of all Buddhas, i.e., the middle view and perfection of wisdom, is the cause for realization of Buddhahood.

Directly Experience the Nature of Mind - Lion's Roar. Instruction on Mahamudra vipashyana meditation by Khenchen Thrangu Rinpoche.

Directly Experience the Nature of Mind - Lion's Roar

The two meditation practices of shamatha and vipashyana each have their place within Mahamudra practice, but they do not have the same objective. Shamatha’s aim is temporary, immediate. Conwisdom. 5families. Open Door Part One. In the 2nd century C.E. the great Mahasiddha Nagarjuna founded the , meaning the middle way between assumptions about eternalism and nihilism.

Open Door Part One

It was the most influential and has come to be known by its Sanskrit name Madhyamaka, U-ma in Tibetan. This school does hold that phenomena certainly exist on the conventional level while engaging in extensive refutations and proofs to establish that all phenomena – both internal mental events and external physical objects – are empty of inherent existence. To analyse the essence, Nagarjuna presented reasons that validly prove why sameness and difference of what would be said to be an inherently existing object are mutually exclusive.

He showed that the true essence of all outer and inner appearances and experiences is - devoid of a cause, - devoid of a result, - devoid of both cause and result, and - that everything manifests as the mere appearance of interdependent arising. Ocean of Certainty ~ Mahamudra teaching given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa ~ The Fourth Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:<br>Accumulation of Merits ~ Guru Yoga Practice. The Fourth Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:Accumulation of Merits ~ Guru Yoga Practice Given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa at Palpung Sherabling, December 2004.Transcribed by Chang Chin & Changchub Saldon Teaching Chapter 14 & 15 and Practice Chapter 13 & 14 Now out of four foundation.

Ocean of Certainty ~ Mahamudra teaching given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa ~ The Fourth Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:<br>Accumulation of Merits ~ Guru Yoga Practice

Ocean of Certainty ~ Mahamudra teaching given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa ~ The Third Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:<br>Accumulation of Merits ~ By Yogi Practice. The Third Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:Accumulation of Merits ~ By Yogi Practice Given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa at Palpung Sherabling, December 2004.Transcribed by Chang Chin & Changchub Saldon Teaching Chapter 12 and Practice Chapter 11.

Ocean of Certainty ~ Mahamudra teaching given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa ~ The Third Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:<br>Accumulation of Merits ~ By Yogi Practice

Ocean of Certainty ~ Mahamudra teaching given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa ~ The Third Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:<br>Accumulation of Merits ~ Mandala Offering Practice. The Third Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:Accumulation of Merits ~ Mandala Offering Practice Given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa at Palpung Sherabling, December 2004.Transcribed by Chang Chin & Changchub Saldon Teaching Chapter 13 and Practice Chapter 12 Now the third foundation - the Mandala Offering, it is accumulation of merit.

Ocean of Certainty ~ Mahamudra teaching given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa ~ The Third Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:<br>Accumulation of Merits ~ Mandala Offering Practice

Why it is accumulation of merit is because your offering,your whole solar system together with all the good things of the universe to Three Jewels and Three Roots, one hundred and ten thousand times. Ocean of Certainty ~ Mahamudra teaching given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa ~ The First Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:<br>Refuge, Prostration, and Bodhicitta Practice.

The First Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:Refuge, Prostration, and Bodhicitta Practice Given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa at Palpung Sherabling, December 2004.Transcribed by Chang Chin & Changchub Saldon Teaching Chapter 8 & 9 and Practice Chapter 8 Now after four ordinary contemplations, preliminary contemplation is completed then you practice four extraordinary preliminary practices.

Ocean of Certainty ~ Mahamudra teaching given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa ~ The First Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:<br>Refuge, Prostration, and Bodhicitta Practice

Ocean of Certainty ~ Mahamudra teaching given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa ~ The Second Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:<br>Dorjesempa Practice. The Second Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:Dorjesempa Practice Given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa at Palpung Sherabling, December 2004.Transcribed by Chang Chin & Changchub Saldon Teaching Chapter 10 & 11 and Practice Chapter 9 & 10.

Ocean of Certainty ~ Mahamudra teaching given by the 12th Kenting Tai Situpa ~ The Second Extraordinary Preliminary Practice:<br>Dorjesempa Practice

Your Breath is Your Brain’s Remote Control. We have all heard this simple saying during times of trouble: “Take a deep breath in.”

Your Breath is Your Brain’s Remote Control

Science being science, however, indicates that we may now have to update this old adage to read “Take a deep breath in it will help you be more emotionally aware but only if you inhale specifically through your nostrils and not your mouth—good luck.” While this may seem a lengthy tip to recall in the midst of uh-oh moments, the power of active breathing—voluntarily inhaling and exhaling to control our breathing rhythm—has been known and used throughout history. Buddhist texts - Wikipedia. Buddhist texts can be categorized in a number of ways. The Western terms "scripture" and "canonical" are applied to Buddhism in inconsistent ways by Western scholars: for example, one authority[1] refers to "scriptures and other canonical texts", while another[2] says that scriptures can be categorized into canonical, commentarial and pseudo-canonical. Another division is that between buddhavacana "word of the Buddha," many of which are known as "Sutras," and other texts.

Tipitaka: The Pali Canon. The Tipitaka (Pali ti, "three," + pitaka, "baskets"), or Pali canon, is the collection of primary Pali language texts which form the doctrinal foundation of Theravada Buddhism. The Tipitaka and the paracanonical Pali texts (commentaries, chronicles, etc.) together constitute the complete body of classical Theravada texts. The Pali canon is a vast body of literature: in English translation the texts add up to thousands of printed pages. Most (but not all) of the Canon has already been published in English over the years.

How to Truly Practice the Heart Sutra? August 16, 2016 – Gurgaon, HY, India This afternoon, the Karmapa continued to discuss the eight sections and focused on the fifth point, the question Shariputra posed: Son of a noble family, how should any son or daughter of a noble family train when they wish to practice the profound perfection of wisdom? The Karmapa narrowed his discussion to two phrases from this sentence: “son or daughter of a noble family” and the “wish to practice.”

From the first, “son or daughter of a noble family” (in Sanskrit kulaputra and kuladuhitā), he selected the word family, which actually means “caste” in Sanskrit, while in a Buddhist context, it refers to those born into the mahayana who have become the Buddha’s child, hence son or daughter of the Buddha’s family or lineage. Calling the Lama from Afar. 34. Calling Guru Afar English.