background preloader

Project-Based Learning

Facebook Twitter

Flipped Learning
Makerspaces

10 Practical Ideas For Better Project-Based Learning In Your Classroom. 10 Practical Ideas For Better Project-Based Learning In Your Classroom By Jennifer Rita Nichols Teachers are incorporating more and more projects into their curriculum, allowing for much greater levels of collaboration and responsibility for students at all levels. Project- based learning is a popular trend, and even teachers who don’t necessarily follow that approach still see the benefit to using projects to advance their students’ learning. Projects can be wonderful teaching tools. They can allow for a more student-centred environment, where teachers can guide students in their learning instead of using lectures to provide them with information. The increase in classroom technology also makes projects more accessible to students. Research no longer requires a trip to the library, and displaying information no longer requires a poster board.

This may happen fairly often because teachers are wary about being able to assign grades to the final assignments handed in to them by students. Makerspaces: A Visual Perspective. Makerspace Starter Kit. The hot new Makerspace Movement is NOT new to Murray Hill Middle School. Eighteen years ago we designed and opened the school with the idea that we would have creation labs in the Media Center, GT room, and the TV studio.

We started with video production, iMovie, Specular LogoMotion, Hyperstudio, and animation with Hollyood High kids. Here's an example of an EARLY (2003) video production called Bookfellas, featuring some Guy Ritchie-esque film direction techniques. These kids are now all grown up and we've kept evolving, too! It's OK to Start Small!

We recently expanded upon our Makerspace offerings thanks to being inspired by several of my librarian friends in our amazing #TLChat PLN! I re-purposed some of my empty study carrels for this Makerspace center at the top corner of our library. As I asserted in a recent blog post about new Ed Tech trends, fads, & tech -you can start small and You Don't Have to Marry It! Amazon Delivers! FUND Me! — Lisa Johnson (@TechChef4u) July 6, 2015. How a School Library Increased Student Use by 1,000 Percent | Cult of Pedagogy. Makerspaces - Beyond the Buzzword. The Flipped Learning Process Visually Explained.

April 2, 2015 After yesterday’s post on “Flipped Learning Resources” one of our readers emailed us this beautiful visual outlining the six main steps involved in the creation of a flipped classroom. These steps include: planning, recording, sharing, changing, grouping, and regrouping. Read the graphic for more details on each of these steps. As a refresher for those who are not yet familiar with the concept of a flipped classroom. Flipped learning or Flipped classroom or is a methodology, an approach to learning in which technology is employed to reverse the traditional role of classroom time. Via Daily Genius Courtesy of eLearning Infographics. Flip This Library: School Libraries Need a Revolution. School libraries need a revolution, not evolution One of the biggest business battles of our time is between Microsoft and Google. The two have very different business models. Microsoft believes that if they build it, we will come—and buy their product.

Google’s approach is different: if they build it, we will integrate it into our lives. What does this have to do with school libraries? School libraries are like Microsoft (without the revenue, of course). Sorry folks, but the old paradigm is broken. Last year, when I thought of revising my book Taxonomies of the School Library Media Program (Hi Willow, 2000), I realized that I had pushed the traditional model of school libraries about as far as it could go.

What has to happen for school libraries to become relevant? The learning commons also includes an experimental learning center, which also occupies a physical and virtual space. What does this new learning commons look like? Do that 180-degree flip How? Need some more examples? It's Never Too Late to Flip! As the upper school librarian at the Bullis School in Potomac, Md., a northwest suburb of Washington, D.C., I’m viewed as a valued resource by teachers who are preparing to embark on research projects with their students. Unfortunately, I don’t have the luxury of spending more than a single class period with students, so it is important that I use the time well. Toward that end, I have developed a set of tools that allows me to optimize my time with them by “flipping” what are traditionally viewed as classroom tasks (lectures) with what are traditionally viewed as homework tasks (researching and writing). I give them information about conducting library research before we ever meet, and I use the time in the classroom to help them digest and use that information to complete their work.

A great deal of flipped learning is occurring in classrooms, but it’s clear to me that the library or media center is a perfect place for flipping. Tips and How-To’s And here is one for AP U.S. Kari M. Gold Standard PBL: Project Based Teaching Practices | Blog. Adapted from Setting the Standard for Project Based Learning: A Proven Approach to Rigorous Classroom Instruction, by John Larmer, John Mergendoller, Suzie Boss (ASCD 2015).

This post is also available as a downloadable article. Teachers who make Project Based Learning a regular part of their teaching enjoy their new role, although for some it might take time to adjust from traditional practice. It’s fun to get creative when designing a project, instead of just using “off the shelf” curriculum materials. Most teachers like working collaboratively with their colleagues when planning and implementing projects, and interacting with other adults from the community or the wider world. And PBL teachers find it rewarding to work closely alongside students, tackling a real-world challenge or exploring a meaningful question. When transitioning to PBL, one of the biggest hurdles for many teachers is the need to give up some degree of control over the classroom, and trust in their students.

5 Keys to Rigorous Project-Based Learning. Five Keys Video Series See Edutopia's core strategies in action with our Five Keys video series. Take a deeper look at each strategy as we share the nuts and bolts of program implementation, give voice to examples from schools around the country, and illuminate the research behind the practices. VIDEO: Establishing Real-World Connections in Projects (Keys to PBL Series Part 1) Students are more engaged when learning relates directly to the world they live in. See how to extend your projects beyond classroom walls. VIDEO: Building Rigorous Projects That Are Core to Learning (Keys to PBL Series Part 2) Project-based learning doesn't mean leaving standards behind. Follow these tips to plan projects that challenge your students and align with core learning goals. VIDEO: Structuring Collaboration for Student Success (Keys to PBL Series Part 3) PBL provides a unique opportunity to help students practice critical thinking, collaboration, communication, and creativity.

Project-Based Learning. Goodpbl. The Difference Between Projects And Project-Based Learning. The Difference Between Projects And Project-Based Learning by TeachThought Staff Projects in the classroom are as old as the classroom itself. “Projects” can represent a range of tasks that can be done at home or in the classroom, by parents or groups of students, quickly or over time. While project-based learning (PBL) also features projects, in PBL the focus is more on the process of learning and learner-peer-content interaction that the end-product itself. The learning process is also personalized in a progressive PBL environment by students asking important questions, and making changes to products and ideas based on individual and collective response to those questions.

In PBL, the projects only serve as an infrastructure to allow users to play, experiment, use simulations, address authentic issues, and work with relevant peers and community members in pursuit of knowledge. By design, PBL is learner-centered. What’s the Difference Between “Doing Projects” and Project Based Learning ? Project-Based Learning Through a Maker's Lens. The rise of the Maker has been one of the most exciting educational trends of the past few years. A Maker is an individual who communicates, collaborates, tinkers, fixes, breaks, rebuilds, and constructs projects for the world around him or her. A Maker, re-cast into a classroom, has a name that we all love: a learner. A Maker, just like a true learner, values the process of making as much as the product.

In the classroom, the act of Making is an avenue for a teacher to unlock the learning potential of her or his students in a way that represents many of the best practices of educational pedagogy. A Makerspace classroom has the potential to create life-long learners through exciting, real-world projects. Making holds a number of opportunities and challenges for a teacher. What Do You Want to Do? The first step in designing a PBL unit for a Maker educator is connecting specific content standards to the project.

Essential Questions Making requires partners. Failure Is a Preferable Option.