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Woman Buys Fish Rotting Away At Walmart, Can’t Believe Her Eyes 4 Weeks Later. Completely neglected and almost falling to pieces, this little fish was severely suffering at the back of a Walmart store, and its condition couldn’t have been worse. He was in such poor shape that he was about to lose his tail and fins. Show Full Text Victoria Schild was not planning to buy any pets that day but after noticing this abandoned fish at the back of a store, she knew that she has to rescue him.

“I felt incredibly sad for the little guy and decided that I didn’t want him to die in there, just rotting away,” Schild told The Dodo, “I was 95 percent sure he was going to die that night.”When she brought him home she was worried that he had only hours to live, but she was not willing to give up. Victoria did everything within her power to save this little fish. “When I got home, I started researching everything that I possibly could to help him recover, and probably within a week of clean warm water, medicine and basic care he started getting better!”

(h/t The Dodo) From Tree to Shining Tree. A forest can feel like a place of great stillness and quiet. But if you dig a little deeper, there’s a hidden world beneath your feet as busy and complicated as a city at rush hour. In this story, a dog introduces us to a strange creature that burrows beneath forests, building an underground network where deals are made and lives are saved (and lost) in a complex web of friendships, rivalries, and business relations. It’s a network that scientists are only just beginning to untangle and map, and it’s not only turning our understanding of forests upside down, it’s leading some researchers to rethink what it means to be intelligent. Produced by Annie McEwen and Brenna Farrell. Special Thanks to Latif Nasser, Stephanie Tam, Teresa Ryan, Marc Guttman, and Professor Nicholas P. Money at Miami University. Correction: An earlier version of this story misidentified naturalist David Attenborough as his late brother, actor Richard Attenborough.

The Secrets of the Wood Wide Web. Epping Forest is a heavily regulated place. First designated as a royal hunting ground by Henry II in the twelfth century, with severe penalties imposed on commoners for poaching, it has since 1878 been managed by the City of London Corporation, which governs behavior within its bounds using forty-eight bylaws. The forest is today almost completely contained within the M25, the notorious orbital motorway that encircles outer London. Minor roads crisscross it, and it is rarely more than four kilometres wide. Several of its hundred or so lakes and ponds are former blast holes of the V1 “doodlebug” rockets flung at London in 1944. Yet the miraculous fact of Epping’s existence remains: almost six thousand acres of trees, heath, pasture, and waterways, just outside the city limits, its grassland still grazed by the cattle of local commoners, and adders still basking in its glades. Despite its mixed-amenity use—from golf to mountain biking—it retains a greenwood magic.

Dolphin Sounds Generate Images, Research Team Discovers. Research team discovers that dolphin sounds generate images with echolocation. Amplify your worldview and explore the science and technology behind the startling announcement of “what-the-dolphin-saw” sound images, by Jack Kassewitz and John Stuart Reid, from CymaScope.com. This week the world was witness to a mind-bending scientific breakthrough: that the clicking sounds that dolphins transmit in using echolocation actually produce pictures that may be the basis of dolphin language.

And further, that with specialized technology—that includes the use of a CymaScope and 3D print technology—researchers have seen what dolphins may be seeing for the first time. This could potentially lead to understanding dolphins and communication with dolphins in their own language. [1] “We’ve been working on dolphin communication for more than a decade,” stated Jack Kassewitz, research team leader and founder of SpeakDolphin.com where images and a press release are available. Watch Nature - Page 2 of 9 Documentaries Online Free. Soil Microbes And Human Health – Learn About The Natural Antidepressant In Soil. By Bonnie L. Grant Prozac may not be the only way to get rid of your serious blues. Soil microbes have been found to have similar effects on the brain and are without side effects and chemical dependency potential.

Learn how to harness the natural antidepressant in soil and make yourself happier and healthier. Read on to see how dirt makes you happy. Natural remedies have been around for untold centuries. These natural remedies included cures for almost any physical ailment as well as mental and emotional afflictions. Soil Microbes and Human Health Advertisement Did you know that there’s a natural antidepressant in soil?

Lack of serotonin has been linked to depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder and bipolar problems. Most avid gardeners will tell you that their landscape is their “happy place” and the actual physical act of gardening is a stress reducer and mood lifter. How Dirt Makes You Happy Watch this video about how gardening makes you happy: 41 Incredible Photos That Show What Parenting Is Like In The Wilderness | Atchuup! – Cool Stuff, Pass It On. How the zebra got its stripes, with Alan Turing. In 1952 a mathematician published a set of equations that tried to explain the patterns we see in nature, from the dappled stripes adorning the back of a zebra to the whorled leaves on a plant stem, or even the complex tucking and folding that turns a ball of cells into an organism.

His name was Alan Turing. More famous for cracking the wartime Enigma code and his contributions to mathematics, computer science and artificial intelligence, it may come as a surprise that Turing harbored such an interest. In fact, it was an extension of his fascination with the workings of the mind and the underlying nature of life. Mockup of a bombe machine at Bletchley Park. Image via Sarah Hartwell. The secret glory of Turing’s wartime success had faded by the 1950s, and he was holed up in the grimly industrial confines of the University of Manchester.

It was a good time to be excited about biology. Against this backdrop Turing took up a subject that had fascinated him since before the war. 16 of The Most Magnificent Trees in The World. How do I love thee, tree? Let me count the ways; you change carbon dioxide into the oxygen we breathe, you sequester carbon, and you provide shelter for countless critters.

There are many reasons for which we should all be tree-hugging hippies, but within the scope of this article, all we’ll focus on is how amazing some of them look. Granted, not all of these amazing beautiful trees are trees (the Wisteria is a vine, Rhododendrons are shrubs, and bamboo technically belongs to the grass family), but we’ll give them a pass because they are amazing, huge and beautiful. So once you step outside and take a breath of fresh air, hug the nearest tree and say thank you! If you know of an amazing tree not on this list, you can submit it at the bottom of this post. 125+ Year Old Rhododendron “Tree” In Canada This huge 125-year-oldold rhododendron is technically not a tree – most are considered to be shrubs. 144-Year-Old Wisteria In Japan Image credits: tungnam.com.hk Wind-Swept Trees In New Zealand.