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Chickens in the garden

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How to Free-Range Your Chickens in the Garden. 13 idéer för dina höns. Många som har höns gör allt för sina små vänner. Här är 13 idéer att bli inspirerad av! Läs också: 10 tips för dig som vill skaffa höns 1. Smart mathållare byggd av avloppsrör! Källa: backyardchickens.com 2. Här har man byggt om en gammal byrå till ett hönsrede. 3. Läs också: Älskar du höns måste du se det här 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Läs också: Sötchock: Se hur kycklingen kläcks 9. 10. Läs också: Ayman Cemani – den helsvarta hönsrasen 11. 12. 13. Läs också: 5 svenska lantrashöns – vilken är din favorit? An Old Swing Set Frame Turned Into A DIY Chicken Coop… Here’s a really clever DIY project. Turning an old swing set frame, either broken or no longer used by the kids into an A frame chicken coop. They’ve simply used the frame of the old swing set, attached some supporting metal around the base to hold it all in shape, attached some corrugated iron sheeting to one end, some capping on the roof, added a door, and attached some chicken wire… The yellow metal runners are being added to help give the entire structure more support… …a close up view of how they’re being fixed… …starting to fix the corrugated iron… …view from behind with sheets attached to the back and both sides… …view from the front… …chicken wire being fixed and it seems the chooks are already interested in their new home… …a frame for the door has been added to the front… …and the door fixed into the frame… …view from the inside showing nesting boxes, perch, watering and feed containers… …the final chicken coop… You might also like to check out this one too –

Free Range, Chicken Tractor, or Permanent Coop, What's The Best Choice? When it comes to housing your chickens, nothing is set in stone. Much depends on your specific situation — location, space available, weather patterns, etc. Some keepers swear by their tractors, while others prefer to let their chickens roam free. If you’re trying to suss out what form of habitat will work best for your chickens, consider the following pros and cons: Free RangeThere are some great benefits to free ranging your flock.

Roaming chickens search out much of their own food, such as insects (many of which are garden pests), berries, and greens. This saves you a considerable amount of money on commercial chicken feed. All this abundant food seems concerning in regards to their fluffy figures, but worry not. However, free ranging chickens can often get into trouble. If you have trouble with wild predators such as foxes, raccoons, or hawks, free ranging carries serious risk. Chicken TractorA chicken tractor is a mobile, enclosed chicken coop that does not have a floor. How to design chicken tractors at MADE Farms Philippines. Run and coop rotation. The notion of Victory Gardens sounds rather quaint these days and conjures up ideas of thrift and service for the war effort.

Used throughout the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada and other places, the Victory Garden was a symbol of pride that helped take pressure off the country’s food production effort during times of crisis like World War One and Two. One idea that was born in that period and mentioned by Geoff Lawton recently whilst we were filming The Urban Permaculture DVD was just how the domestic chicken coop was pressed into action in a slightly unusual way.

Visiting a domestic chicken coop Geoff commented how the floor of the yard was bone dry. The Double Run Chicken System Geoff suggested that this chicken coop which had a generous run could be more productive if the owner would fence off half the yard – effectively splitting it into two chicken runs. Chickens in the Garden: Eggs, Meat, Chicken Manure Fertilizer and More. Fresh, nutritious eggs and homegrown roast chicken dinners are reason enough to raise your own poultry. If you use your chickens in the garden, you can also harvest rich manure to create homemade fertilizer, and put your flock to work mixing organic wastes into superb compost. Plus, if you let your birds range on your property, get ready for a big bonus: They’ll provide terrific control of ticks and other pests. The Cost of Raising Chickens An adult standard hen eats about 84 pounds of feed per year, according to Ohio State University (she’ll need less commercial feed if she is free-range, penned on pasture or given lots of table scraps).

Bagged feed at a retailer, such as Tractor Supply Co., currently costs about 35 cents per pound, so feeding one hen for a year will cost close to $30. This number will be higher if you pay a premium for organic feed, and lower if you buy your feed from a bulk supplier. Bird Benefits: The Garden Factor The Value of Chicken Manure Fertilizer Deep Litter. Healthy News and Information.