background preloader

State Surveillance

Facebook Twitter

Finding Proportionality in Surveillance Laws – Andrew Murray. US government to continue to administer Safe Harbor after ECJ ruling. Peter/Flickr (CC) The US government says it will continue to administer the "Safe Harbor" program, a framework for transferring citizens' data between Europe and the US — despite it being struck down by Europe's top court earlier this month.

US government to continue to administer Safe Harbor after ECJ ruling

Any Safe Harbor self-certifications issued by the US Department of Commerce since the ruling will not hold any legal weight with European authorities — meaning American companies who choose to take this route are opening themselves up to legal challenges from national regulators. The 2000 Safe Harbor decision was a way to unify Europe and America's disparate regulatory regimes, and streamline the transfer of data on citizens between the two regions for companies. It meant that US companies could self-certify with the Department of Commerce, and not have to worry about differences in regulation in over 20 European countries.

GCHQ can spy on MPs, tribunal rules. But following a challenge by Green MP Caroline Lucas and others, the IPT has ruled that is has no legal basis. • Fears GCHQ could be spying on MSPs Ms Lucas said the ruling was a “body blow for democracy” while a leading civil rights lawyer said it meant the doctrine was “not worth the paper it was written on”.

GCHQ can spy on MPs, tribunal rules

The tribunal panel, headed by Mr Justice Burton, also ruled the doctrine only applies to targeted, and not incidental, interception of Parliamentary communications. And it did not apply to members of devolved assemblies or MEPs. • Blanket surveillance is a stain on our democracy. Plow. Ecf.dcd.uscourts. It’s No Secret That the Government Uses Zero Days for “Offense” Little by little, the government is opening up about its use of computer security vulnerabilities.

It’s No Secret That the Government Uses Zero Days for “Offense”

Last month, the NSA disclosed that it has historically “released more than 91% of vulnerabilities discovered in products that have gone through our internal review process and that are made and used in the United States.” There should probably be an asterisk or four accompanying that statement. But more on that in a minute. First, it’s worth examining why the government is being even the slightest bit forthcoming about this issue. Since 2014, EFF has been suing under the Freedom of Information Act to get access to what the government calls the Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP). We’ve had some real success. NSA shuttered bulk email program in 2011, replaced with similar initiatives. Internet's root name servers DDoS attacks peak at ...

NSA shuttered bulk email program in 2011, replaced with similar initiatives

Two unusual DDoS attacks targeted several of the the internet's root name severs. Cybercrime article on Guardian site delivers malware via ... NSA Ordered to Stop Collecting, Querying Plaintiffs' Phone Records. Affirming his previous ruling that the NSA’s telephone records collection program is unconstitutional, a federal judge ordered the NSA to cease collecting the telephone records of an individual and his business.

NSA Ordered to Stop Collecting, Querying Plaintiffs' Phone Records

The judge further ordered the NSA to segregate any records that have already been collected so that they are not reviewed when the NSA’s telephone records database is queried. The order comes 20 days before the NSA program is set to expire pursuant to the USA FREEDOM Act. United States District Judge Richard Leon issued the order in Klayman v. Obama, a case in which EFF appeared as amicus curiae. It’s No Secret That the Government Uses Zero Days for “Offense” NSA shuttered bulk email program in 2011, replaced with similar initiatives.

ODNI Announces Transition to New Telephone... The NSA sure breaks a lot of "unbreakable" crypto. This is probably how they do it. / Boing Boing. There have long been rumors, leaks, and statements about the NSA "breaking" crypto that is widely believed to be unbreakable, and over the years, there's been mounting evidence that in many cases, they can do just that.

The NSA sure breaks a lot of "unbreakable" crypto. This is probably how they do it. / Boing Boing

Now, Alex Halderman and Nadia Heninger, along with a dozen eminent cryptographers have presented a paper at the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (a paper that won the ACM's prize for best paper at the conference) that advances a plausible theory as to what's going on. In some ways, it's very simple -- but it's also very, very dangerous, for all of us. The paper describes how in Diffie-Hellman key exchange -- a common means of exchanging cryptographic keys over untrusted channels -- it's possible to save a lot of computation and programmer time by using one of a few, widely agreed-upon large prime numbers.

Australia's new Data Retention laws

State surveillance privacy Freedom of expression. NSA backdoors in products. NSA Surveillance and PRISM. GCHQ allowed to spy on MPs and peers, secret court rules. Data Protection: filling the post-Safe Harbour vacuum. Study reports draft EU Data Protection Regulation leaves gaps in protection when it comes to Big Data, Internet of Things and smart devices. A study published 22 September 2015 criticises the EU’s development of its Digital Single Market (‘DSM’) strategy for being overly commercially and economically driven, with little attention to the key legal and social challenges regarding privacy and personal data protection.

Study reports draft EU Data Protection Regulation leaves gaps in protection when it comes to Big Data, Internet of Things and smart devices

China and DP

Spain surveillance. Germany state surveillance. France surveillance. NSA PRISM program. NSA and GCHQ unlock privacy and security on the internet. State surveillance privacy Freedom of expression. Omniveillance. NSA backdoors in products.