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Ill-gotten gains – why Americanisms are a boon for the British. Do you hate Americanisms?

Ill-gotten gains – why Americanisms are a boon for the British

Lots of people wince and reach for the green ink if they hear a British person speak of death as “passing”. Yet that euphemism is present in Chaucer and Shakespeare. What about “oftentimes”? It’s in the King James Bible. And even “the fall” for autumn is good old 17th-century English, a shortening of the traditional term “fall of the leaf”. By contrast, some phrases that appear echt-British are, in fact, American. Is street slang affecting our children's employment prospects? - RECRUITING TIMES. It has been suggested that some people are unaware of the nuances that govern appropriate use of slang Some employers have reported receiving messages from applicants replete with slang and emojis; some have even been contacted over social media with friend requests Experts have voiced concern that the slang used by many young – and some not so young – people today is creating a negative impression that ruins their chances of getting a job.

Is street slang affecting our children's employment prospects? - RECRUITING TIMES

Inappropriate usage. Clive James: ‘The English language is under siege from tone-deaf activists’ From alright to zap: an A-Z of horrible words. A‘alright’

From alright to zap: an A-Z of horrible words

Teens Aren't Ruining Language. The battle over the words used to describe migrants - BBC News. Images of people scrambling over barbed wire fences in Calais or crossing the Mediterranean in fishing boats have dominated the media over the last few months.

The battle over the words used to describe migrants - BBC News

And a debate has even emerged about the very words used to describe people. The word migrant is defined in Oxford English Dictionary as "one who moves, either temporarily or permanently, from one place, area, or country of residence to another". It is used as a neutral term by many media organisations - including the BBC - but there has been criticism of that use. News website al-Jazeera has decided it will not use migrant and "will instead, where appropriate, say refugee". The word 'rape' is becoming a joke on Twitter. Are we in danger of sanitising the crime? Twitter threats sent to Caroline Criado-Perez (Photo: PA) Last week two people pleaded guilty to sending menacing tweets to Caroline Criado-Perez.

The word 'rape' is becoming a joke on Twitter. Are we in danger of sanitising the crime?

I’ve written about trolling, especially the misogynistic variety, elsewhere. When insults become the norm, dialogue is debased. Fraped.

When insults become the norm, dialogue is debased

For the unacquainted, it's a perturbing portmanteau of "Facebook" and "raped" – something that happens when you forget to log out and forget to cut out that annoying practical joker friend from your life. Johnson: Language anxieties: A long decline. CAROLYN BOINTON: Why are we ashamed to speak English language properly? Comments (0) This week, columnist Carolyn Bointon takes a look at the importance of speaking the English language properly.

CAROLYN BOINTON: Why are we ashamed to speak English language properly?

Read what she had to say here: MY daughter Jessie and I went away for a week in Cardigan Bay over half term and I couldn't help but be impressed by the obvious pride the Welsh have in their language. Everything, from menus to road signs, was written in both English and Welsh and, pretty well everywhere we went, we heard people talking in their native tongue. It got me wondering why we, in England, don't share such an immense pride in speaking English. The weather wasn't perfect. Um or er: which do you, um, use more in, er, conversation? In the historic struggle between the ummers and the errers, the ummers are getting the upper hand.

Um or er: which do you, um, use more in, er, conversation?

A study of speech patterns by socio-linguists at Edinburgh University has found that English speakers increasingly tend to use “um” rather than “er” as the filler of choice. Earlier this year on the Andrew Marr Show, Nigel Farage used 15 “ers” and just two “ums”. Get with the programme grandad: don’t you realise that to er may be human, but to um is increasingly on-trend? Consider Liverpool captain Steven Gerrard who, by contrast, used nine “ums” and one “er” recently when discussing the 1-1 draw with Everton. Separate studies have found that men and older people prefer to use “er”, while women and teenagers prefer to fill their manifold sentential lacunae with “ums”. Is American Ruining the English Language? (I) Opinion By Farooq Kperogi I have written several articles on this page regarding the notion that American English is a corrupt version of British English.

Is American Ruining the English Language? (I)

I recently stumbled on an exceedingly profound and insightful article on pbs.org on this topic by Professor John Algeo, one of the world's most recognized authorities on history of the English language, British-American differences, and current usage. I know my readers will enjoy it as I did. For more than 200 years, right up through Prince Charles, people have complained that Americans trash the English language. America is ruining the English language - everyone knows that. Mind your language. The Plain English Campaign. Since 1979, we have been campaigning against gobbledygook, jargon and misleading public information.

The Plain English Campaign

We have helped many government departments and other official organisations with their documents, reports and publications. We believe that everyone should have access to clear and concise information. The campaign officially began after founder, Chrissie Maher OBE, publicly shredded hundreds of official documents in Parliament Square, London. Entirely independent, we fund our work through our commercial services, which include editing and training. We have worked with thousands of organisations including many UK Government departments public authorities and international banks, helping them make sure their public information is as clear as possible.

Our Crystal Mark now appears on more than 21,000 documents worldwide. Should banter be banned? The vogue for banning words. The Banned List: Top 100. I have an article in The Independent today about the Banned List, so I reproduce the latest version here. These are the top 100 words and phrases to avoid. 10 Things People Once Complained Would Ruin The English Language.

The last taboos. Don't fear our changing language. How the English language became such a mess. You may have seen a poem by Gerard Nolst Trinité called The Chaos. It starts like this: Dearest creature in creation Studying English pronunciation, I will teach you in my verse.