background preloader

Science

Facebook Twitter

Reaction Engine's Skylon: A brilliantly British spaceplane. Skip to Content Home » Reaction Engine's Skylon: A brilliantly British spaceplane Reaction Engine's Skylon: A brilliantly British spaceplane Bookmark/Search this post with: Copyright © 2014 .

Reaction Engine's Skylon: A brilliantly British spaceplane

Copyright 2010 Ben Gilliland. 4395741_700b_v1.jpg (JPEG Image, 700×5426 pixels) Bad Science. Why Nikola Tesla was the greatest geek who ever lived. Additional notes from the author: If you want to learn more about Tesla, I highly recommend reading Tesla: Man Out of Time Also, this Badass of the week by Ben Thompson is what originally inspired me to write a comic about Tesla.

Why Nikola Tesla was the greatest geek who ever lived

Ben's also got a book out which is packed full of awesome. There's an old movie from the 80s on Netflix Instant Queue right now about Tesla: The Secret of Nikola Tesla. It's corny and full of bad acting, but it paints a fairly accurate depiction of his life. The drunk history of Tesla is quite awesome, too. History.com has a great article about Edison and how his douchebaggery had a chokehold on American cinema. 6705527051_c746d29403_o.png (PNG Image, 5106×789 pixels) - Scaled (26.

Mind = Blown. Can 1 miracle plant solve the world's 3 greatest problems? If someone were to tell you that they had a technology — a weed actually — that could sequester huge amounts of carbon permanently while lifting villagers out of poverty by providing both protein-rich food and super-insulated building materials, you might start to wonder if they were, well, smoking a different weed.

Can 1 miracle plant solve the world's 3 greatest problems?

But it appears that one retired building contractor, Bill Loftus, has actually come upon a brilliant application of the fast-growing, carbon-sucking plant known as Kenaf. Kenaf is in the Hibiscus family and is thus related to both cotton and okra. Originally from Africa, this 4,000-year-old crop was used for its fiber. It has the astonishing ability to grow up to 14 feet in one growing season, yielding 6-10 tons of fiber per acre and making it a great source of pulp for paper. But researchers have also discovered (PDF) a corresponding ability of Kenaf to inhale huge quantities of our most abundant global warming gas — CO2. But its not enough to simply absorb CO2. Wind Map: Historical. An invisible, ancient source of energy surrounds us—energy that powered the first explorations of the world, and that may be a key to the future.

Wind Map: Historical

This map shows you a historical snapshot of the delicate tracery of wind flowing over the US. See the live map for current winds. Wind map prints are available from Point.B Studio. Read more about wind and about wind power. The wind map is a personal art project, not associated with any company. If the map is missing or seems slow, we recommend the latest Chrome browser. Surface wind data from the National Digital Forecast Database.

If you're looking for a weather map, or just want more detail on the weather today, see these more traditional maps of temperature and wind. Io9. We come from the future.