A_Challenge_to_Democracy_%281944%29
Japanese American internment Japanese American internment Japanese American internment was the World War II internment in "War Relocation Camps" of over 110,000 people of Japanese heritage who lived on the Pacific coast of the United States. The U.S. government ordered the internment in 1942, shortly after Imperial Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor.[2][3] The internment of Japanese Americans was applied unequally as a geographic matter: all who lived on the West Coast were interned, while in Hawaii, where 150,000-plus Japanese Americans comprised over one-third of the population, only 1,200[4] to 1,800 were interned. Sixty-two percent of the internees were American citizens.[5][6] President Franklin D.
YOU HAVE NO RIGHTS - George Carlin
George Carlin - We Like War (08:03)
George Carlin George Carlin George Denis Patrick Carlin[1] (May 12, 1937 – June 22, 2008) was an American comedian, writer, social critic, and actor who won five Grammy Awards for his comedy albums.[2] Carlin was noted for his black humor as well as his thoughts on politics, the English language, psychology, religion, and various taboo subjects. Carlin and his "Seven dirty words" comedy routine were central to the 1978 U.S. Supreme Court case F.C.C. v. Pacifica Foundation, in which a 5–4 decision by the justices affirmed the government's power to regulate indecent material on the public airwaves. One newspaper called Carlin "the dean of counterculture comedians.