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spacetoday.net spacetoday.net Posted: Fri, Apr 11 6:25 AM ET (1025 GMT) An Atlas 5 successfully launched a classified satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) on Thursday. The Atlas 5 541 lifted off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, at 1:45 pm EDT (1745 GMT) on a mission designated NROL-67. Coverage of the launch ended a few minutes after liftoff, although an Air Force press release later Thursday called the launch a success. While the NRO hasn't released information about the satellite launched on Thursday, some experts believe the launch carried a new signals intelligence satellite that will operate from geosynchronous orbit. The launch had been scheduled for late March but was postponed by the failure of a tracking radar at Cape Canaveral that also delayed the launch of a Falcon 9.
The Planetary Society Blog

Universe Today

Universe Today Einstein Lecturing. (Ferdinand Schmutzer, Public Domain) One of the benefits of being an astrophysicist is your weekly email from someone who claims to have “proven Einstein wrong”. These either contain no mathematical equations and use phrases such as “it is obvious that..”, or they are page after page of complex equations with dozens of scientific terms used in non-traditional ways.

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2014 April 14 An Unusual Globule in IC 1396 Credit & Copyright: T. Rector (U. Alaska Anchorage) & H. Astronomy Picture of the Day
SpaceWeather.com COUNTDOWN TO PLUTO: NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is closing in on Pluto. Officials say the encounter begins less than a year from now. Although Pluto has been demoted from planethood by a small group of professional astronomers, it is still a sizable world, some 5000 miles around the equator with a system of moons and perhaps even rings. New Horizons is heading for one of the most exciting planetary flybys of the Space Age.

SpaceWeather.com