Internet kill switch

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10 Safe Chat Sites for Teens That Aren’t Too Lame | DSL Service Providers 10 Safe Chat Sites for Teens That Aren’t Too Lame | DSL Service Providers Teens love to hang out and talk to their friends, but that’s not always safe to do online. It can be hard to figure out which sites are safe and which ones are scams, and even when you do find safe ones, they’re a drag. Well, not anymore. Here are ten sites that allow teens to chat, play, have fun and just chill safely.
12 min ago | ChinaTechNews.com Alibaba Throws Money At Internet Privacy Hu Xiaoming, Alibaba's vice president for small- and micro-financial group and chief risk officer, announced in Beijing that the company will invest CNY40 million to establish a security fund. Hype and Hyperbole about the Internet Kill Switch and Privacy - What You Need to Know

Hype and Hyperbole about the Internet Kill Switch and Privacy - What You Need to Know

Obama 'Internet kill switch' plan approved by US Senate panel A US Senate committee has approved a wide-ranging cybersecurity bill that some critics have suggested would give the US president the authority to shut down parts of the Internet during a cyberattack. Senator Joe Lieberman and other bill sponsors have refuted the charges that the Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act gives the president an Internet "kill switch." Instead, the bill puts limits on the powers the president already has to cause "the closing of any facility or stations for wire communication" in a time of war, as described in the Communications Act of 1934, they said in a breakdown of the bill published on the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee website. Obama 'Internet kill switch' plan approved by US Senate panel
Internet Blackout Costs Egypt £56m | eWEEK Europe UK Internet Blackout Costs Egypt £56m | eWEEK Europe UK The Egyptian government’s blocking of Internet services for five days is likely to have cost the country roughly $90 million (£56m), according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The blocked telecommunication and Internet services account for between three and four percent of the country’s GDP, equivalent to a loss of $18 million (£11m) per day. However, the OECD warns that the long-term impact could be far greater, as the cut-off could have deterred foreign investors from expanding their operations in Egypt. “Egypt has signed the OECD Seoul Declaration for the Future of the Internet Economy, which calls for an ‘open, decentralised and dynamic Internet’. This is vital to innovative businesses developing services on top of the Internet infrastructure,” said OECD spokesman Arthur Mickoleit in an emailed statement to eWEEK Europe.
[0903.3218] Nation-State Routing: Censorship, Wiretapping, and BGP
Internet blackouts: Reaching for the kill switch