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Game challenges young people to spot "fake news" Teaching Strategies to Detect Fake News. During his farewell address in Chicago, President Obama stated, “Increasingly we become so secure in our bubbles that we start accepting only information, whether it’s true or not, that fits our opinions, instead of basing our opinions on the evidence that is out there.”

Teaching Strategies to Detect Fake News

He wasn’t just speaking about social media echo chambers and fervent emotional appeals. He was speaking about fake news. Fake news is news that is explicitly made up. A lie. False information passed off as though true. The advent of smartphones and tablets allows students more access to information than any generation of humanity ever before. Thankfully, teachers have responded to the fake news epidemic in droves.

UnSpun: Finding Facts in a World of Disinformation by Brooks Jackson and Kathleen Hall Jamieson tops my list of must-reads for teachers. St. Pi Day is almost here. With St. March is National Nutrition Month, and it’s important to teach students the... Lesson plan: How to teach your students about fake news. Fake news is making news, and it’s a problem.

Lesson plan: How to teach your students about fake news

Not only did a BuzzFeed data analysis find that viral stories falsely claiming that the Pope endorsed Donald Trump and that Hillary Clinton sold weapons to terrorists receive more Facebook attention than the most popular news stories from established news outlets, but a false story about child trafficking in a Washington, D.C. pizza restaurant inspired a North Carolina man to drive 5 hours with a shotgun and other weapons to investigate. This lesson gives students media literacy skills they need to navigate the media, including how to spot fake news. Subjects Social studies, U.S. government, civics, journalism Estimated Time One 50-minute class Grade Level Introduction. American Libraries Magazine.

Librarians—whether public, school, academic, or special—all seek to ensure that patrons who ask for help get accurate information.

American Libraries Magazine

Given the care that librarians bring to this task, the recent explosion in unverified, unsourced, and sometimes completely untrue news has been discouraging, to say the least. According to the Pew Research Center, a majority of US adults are getting their news in real time from their social media feeds. These are often uncurated spaces in which falsehoods thrive, as revealed during the 2016 election. To take just one example, Pope Francis did not endorse Donald Trump, but thousands of people shared the “news” that he had done so. Completely fake news is at the extreme end of a continuum. The news-savvy consumer is able to distinguish fact from opinion and to discern the hallmarks of evasive language and half-truths. Librarians and journalists: natural allies Librarians can help change this trend.

The Fact Checker’s guide for detecting fake news. Consider these points before sharing a news article on Facebook. It could be fake. (Monica Akhtar/The Washington Post) GO TenQuestionsForFakeNewsFINAL. We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned : All Tech Considered. "The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could kind of infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right.

We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned : All Tech Considered

" Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Fanatic Studio/Getty Images "The whole idea from the start was to build a site that could kind of infiltrate the echo chambers of the alt-right. " A lot of fake and misleading news stories were shared across social media during the election. We wondered who was behind that story and why it was written. We tried to look up who owned it and hit a wall.

By day, John Jansen is head of engineering at Master-McNeil Inc., a tech company in Berkeley, Calif. Jansen started by looking at the site's history. Jansen is kind of like an archaeologist. The "Denver Guardian" was built and designed using a pretty common platform — WordPress. "That was sort of the thread that started to unravel everything," Jansen says. Lesson Plan: How to Spot Fake News. The problem of fake news came to a dizzying head in 2016 when a man fired a shot in a family pizzeria as he “self-investigated” a false report of a child abuse ring led by top democrats.

Lesson Plan: How to Spot Fake News

A BuzzFeed report confirmed that fake news stories, such as the one that claimed Hillary Clinton sold arms to ISIS, were actually viewed more times than articles from established and legitimate news sources. Did fake news have an impact on the election? How do we address the problem from here? This lesson plan features a Channel One News report on the problem. Then, students analyze the problem and consider steps media outlets and individuals need to take to prevent the viral spread of propaganda. Opening Activity Warm up: Ask students: How do you get your news? Words in the News: Review this word prior to viewing the video. propaganda (noun): Information that is often exaggerated or false and spread for the purpose of benefiting or promoting a specific individual or cause.

Discuss. How to choose your news. How the media landscape has changed Media visionary Clay Shirky gave a TED Talk on how the media landscape has changed.

How to choose your news

“The moment we’re living through, the moment our historical generation is living through, is the largest increase in expressive capability in human history.” In other words, the amount of information we are capable of capturing is unprecedented. As a result, we need new techniques to filter through the information and need to work much harder than previous generation to better understand our world. Watch Clay Shirky’s fascinating media discussion on TED-Ed. Understanding social media The TED Book “Our Virtual Shadow: Why We Are Obsessed with Documenting Our Lives Online” discusses the challenges of social media turning every day folks into journalists. You can read an excerpt of Our Virtual Shadow on the TED blog. Journalism can be much more than reporting. Can You Tell Fake News From Real? Study Finds Students Have 'Dismaying' Inability. Stanford researchers assessed students from middle school to college and found they struggled to distinguish ads from articles, neutral sources from biased ones and fake accounts from real ones.

Can You Tell Fake News From Real? Study Finds Students Have 'Dismaying' Inability

Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images Stanford researchers assessed students from middle school to college and found they struggled to distinguish ads from articles, neutral sources from biased ones and fake accounts from real ones. If the children are the future, the future might be very ill-informed. That's one implication of a new study from Stanford researchers that evaluated students' ability to assess information sources and described the results as "dismaying," "bleak" and "[a] threat to democracy. " As content creators and social media platforms grapple with the fake news crisis, the study highlights the other side of the equation: What it looks like when readers are duped. "The photograph had no attribution. How false news can spread.