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Ballads and Corridos

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02 Big Rock Candy Mountain. 01 Corrido De Kiansas. 02 Two Good Men. 05 Sinaloa Cowboys. 12 Ballad of Jessup Dolly (The Wind & Rain) 01 The Great Dust Storm (Dust Storm Disaster) 10 Tom Joad Part II. 09 Tom Joad Part I. 03 John Hardy 1. 02 Casey Jones. 14 Frankie and Johnny. 11 Frankie_Mississippi John Hurt. 08 Staggerlee (Stackolee) 1. Kansas Historical Quarterly - Cowboy Ballads. By Myra Hull February 1939 (Vol. 8, No. 1), pages 35 to 60.

Kansas Historical Quarterly - Cowboy Ballads

Transcribed by lhn; digitized with permission of the Kansas Historical Society. ALL the cowboy songs in this collection are genuine; that is, they have actually been sung by ranchers and cowboys on the range, along the trail, in the night herder's lone vigils on the prairie, or in the cowboy's moments of relaxation around the campfire and in the dance hall in the open cow town at the end of the trail. None of the songs here recorded have been borrowed from other collections. Some of them I heard as a child, as they were sung by my cowboy brothers, by hired hands, or by the cattlemen who frequently stayed the night at our homestead in Butler county, twenty miles from Jesse Chisholm's trading post, on the old Chisholm trail; others were set down for me as remembered by old time cowboys of the 1870's, such as N.

I have been inspired by such ballad collectors as N. Cowboy songs are ballads; that is, they are stories in song. N. 05 Little Joe, the Wrangler. 04 Whoopie Ti-Yi-Yo, Get Along Little Dogies. 18 Jesse James. 05 The Old Chisholm Trail. 05 Billy The Kid. 17 The Streets Of Laredo. David Bromberg - Spanish Johnny. Narcocorrido. History[edit] This genre of music is the evolution of traditional corrido ballads of the Mexican-US border region, which stemmed from the 16th-century Spanish genre of romance.

Narcocorrido

Among the earliest exponents of narcocorrido music were Los Alegres de Teran, who recorded many. In the 1980s, Rosalino "Chalino" Sánchez contributed to narcocorridos. Known throughout Mexico as "El Pelavacas" (Cow Skin Peeler), El Indio (The Indian, from his corrido "El Indio Sánchez"), and "Mi Compa" (My Friend), Chalino was a Mexican immigrant living in Los Angeles. He then began distributing his music for a sale price.

Various companies, governmental agencies, and individuals have sought to ban narcocorridos. Violence in narcocorrido industry[edit] 12 Valentin Felix. 04 El Zorro De Ojinaga. Narcocorridos: The Balladeers of Mexico's Drug Wars. Videos: Singing Songs of Drug Violence. 04 Los Traficantes Del Bravo. 12 Corrido De Pablo Acosta. 10 La Mafia Muere. Heisenberg Song Breaking Bad(English Subs) 22 Rinches De Texas. 15 Texas Rangers. Corrido Background Notes. Hispano Folk Music of the Rio Grande Del Norte. 05 Los Comanchitos. 10 Delgadina. 11 Corrido De Arnulfo González. 16 Delgadina. Sin Fronteras. 20 Corrido De Martin Luther King. 16 Los Derechos Civiles. 17 Homenaje A J.F. Kennedy. Américo Paredes: Biography. Américo Paredes is generally recognized as one of the seminal Mexican American scholars of the 20th century.

Américo Paredes: Biography

Along with George I. Sánchez, Arthur León Campa, Julian Samora, fellow Texan Carlos Castañeda, and others he helped develop the foundations of modern Mexican American scholarship with his outstanding scholarly contributions. From mid-century onward his studies of corridos, folkloric ballads, machismo, and border stereotypes of Mexicanos formed the basis of a whole school of southwestern folklore most of whose investigators he trained. Paredes was born in Brownsville, Texas on 3 September 1915 at a time of great border tension and violence resulting from the 1910 Mexican Revolution. His father, Justo Paredes, came from a ranching family that had settled on both sides of the lower Rio Grande valley in the mid-1700s after nearly two centuries as part of a Sephardic colony in Nuevo León.

Paredes resigned both jobs in 1944 to enter the U.S. Biography courtesy of Dr. 1-01 Gregorio Cortez (Parts 1 & 2) 1-02 Joaquin Murrieta (Parts 1 & 2) The Mexican corrido. Fleur du Printemps has also answered our appeal to our Readers to send us the songs telling about their history, presenting us this beautiful bouquet of the corridos of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920).

The Mexican corrido

The photos commenting the texts are by the photographer of the Revolution Agustín Victor Casasola (1874-1938). The corridos are the Mexican offsprings of the Spanish romance. They express feelings and ideas, triumphs and defeats, pains and happiness which are so overflowing to constitute a collective importance for the Mexican folk. Anglo-Scots Ballad Tradition Notes. Dives and Lazarus Rick Lee (child 56) 19 Barbry Ellen (Barbara Allen) 02 Geordie_Martin Carthy. 06 Sheath & Knife-Christine Kydd. Sheath and Knife (Roud 3960; Child 16) 03 Jack Orion_Martiny Carthy w. 01 Willy's Lady_Martin Carthy. 10 Drowned Lovers. Tam Lin - Fairport Convention [Audio]

Tam Lin. The story has been adapted into various stories, songs and films.

Tam Lin

Synopsis[edit] Most variants begin with the warning that Tam Lin collects either a possession or the virginity of any maiden who passes through the forest of Carterhaugh. When a young woman, usually called Janet or Margaret, goes to Carterhaugh and plucks a double rose, Tam appears and asks why she has come without his leave and taken what is his. She states that she owns Carterhaugh, because her father has given it to her.

In most variants, Janet then goes home and discovers that she is pregnant; some variants pick up the story at this point. She asks him whether he was ever human, either after that reappearance or, in some versions, immediately after their first meeting resulted in her pregnancy. 04 Tam Lin-Frankie Armstrong. Tam Lin (Roud 35; Child 39) > Sandy Denny > Songs > Fairport Convention: Tam Lin> Anne Briggs > Songs > Young Tambling> A.L.

Tam Lin (Roud 35; Child 39)

Lloyd > Songs > Tamlyn> The Watersons > Songs > Mike Waterson: Tamlyn> Steeleye Span > Songs > Tam Lin [ Roud 35 ; Child 39 ; Ballad Index C039 ; trad.] For much more information about this ballad than can be shown here, see Abigail Acland's comprehensive Tam Lin web pages. This is a truly magical ballad. It was first mentioned in The Complaynt of Scotland in 1549 but no words were published until Herd put a fragment into his Ancient and Modern Scots Songs in 1769.