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Levels of Thinking and Technology Use

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Bloomin' Apps. Teaching with the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy. Bloom's Digital Taxonomy. This is the introduction to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy.

Bloom's Digital Taxonomy

The different taxonomical levels can be viewed individually via the navigation bar or below this introduction as embedded pages. This is an update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous. Bloom's Revised Taxonomy describes many traditional classroom practices, behaviours and actions, but does not account for the new processes and actions associated with Web 2.0 technologies, infowhelm (the exponential growth in information), increasing ubiquitous personal technologies or cloud computing.Bloom's Digital Taxonomy isn't about the tools or technologies rather it is about using these to facilitate learning.

Outcomes on rubrics are measured by competence of use and most importantly the quality of the process or product. For example. Key Resources This infographic links Blooms Digital Taxonomy to the communication spectrum. Applying. Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy – CELT. If you have trouble accessing the interactive Flash-based model below, the content is available in a text-only table.

Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy – CELT

View Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy Model (text-only) website. A statement of a learning objective contains a verb (an action) and an object (usually a noun). The verb generally refers to [actions associated with] the intended cognitive process.The object generally describes the knowledge students are expected to acquire or construct. (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, pp. 4–5) The cognitive process dimension represents a continuum of increasing cognitive complexity—from remember to create.

(Table 1 adapted from Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, pp. 67–68.) The knowledge dimension represents a range from concrete (factual) to abstract (metacognitive) (Table 2). (Table 2 adapted from Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001, p. 46.). Recommended resources Bloom et al.’s Taxonomy of the Cognitive Domain (Dr. SAMR. SAMR Swimming Lessons. You want me to do what with technology?

SAMR Swimming Lessons

I’ve received lots of great feedback on my SAMR Swimming Pool analogy (Taking a Dip in the SAMR Swimming Pool). This was an idea originated by Greg Garner’s take on Dr. Ruben Puentedura’s often referred to “SAMR ladder” and then “remixed” if you will by me. Well…it’s time for another remix because after reading that original post I realized something. I got it wrong. I focused on the teacher’s role in the pool the entire time and didn’t think about the students as much. 8 Examples of Transforming Lessons Through the SAMR Cycle.

The SAMR Model for integrating technology into teaching, developed by Dr.

8 Examples of Transforming Lessons Through the SAMR Cycle

Ruben Puentedura, has gained a good deal of exposure in recent years. “SAMR” is an acronym that stands for Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, and Redefinition. The SAMR model provides a technique for moving through degrees of technology adoption to find more meaningful uses of technology in teaching and move away from simply using “tech for tech’s sake”. We recently discussed the SAMR model during an Academic Technology Work Group meeting at The College of Westchester. We examined the video, SAMR in 120 Seconds. Following are 8 examples of the SAMR process, each taking an example of a typical classroom exercise that does not use technology and walking it through each phase of SAMR. The goal of this exercise was to help me (and readers) better understand the SAMR model, and to really see how lessons and assessments can be transformed while considering the benefits of evolving them through these stages.

SAMR Model Explained for Teachers. Below is a great video explaining the SAMR model in 120 seconds.

SAMR Model Explained for Teachers

SAMR is a framework through which you can assess and evaluate the technology you use in your class. Here is how the video below shared by Candace M explains the SAMR's four levels: Substitution In a substitution level, teachers or students are only using new technology tools to replace old ones, for instance, using Google Docs to replace Microsoft Word. the task ( writing) is the same but the tools are different. Augmentation Though it is a different level, but we are still in the substitution mentality but this time with added functionalities. Again using the example of Google docs, instead of only writing a document and having to manually save it and share it with others, Google Docs provides extra services like auto saving, auto syncing, and auto sharing in the cloud. SAMR Model Explained for Teachers.