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Synthetic Biology for Health

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How Scientists Trained a Virus to Kill Only Cancer Cells Trending. You’ve heard of virus causing cancer.

How Scientists Trained a Virus to Kill Only Cancer Cells Trending

Now here’s a virus that can fight cancer. To selectively destroy cancer cells, scientists in Barcelona, Spain are turning to an unfriendly pathogen – a virus. By genetically modifying a strain of adenovirus, the researchers say they successfully manipulated the expression of certain proteins in cancer cells, which had the effect of reducing cancer growth. Première utilisation de CRISPR/Cas9 pour tenter de combattre le cancer. CANCER.

Première utilisation de CRISPR/Cas9 pour tenter de combattre le cancer

Pour la première fois, la technique d'édition génétique Crispr-Cas9 a été utilisée pour tenter de combattre le cancer chez l'homme. Une équipe de chercheurs de la Sichuan University de Chengdu en Chine a injecté le 28 octobre 2016 des cellules génétiquement modifiées pour reconnaître et attaquer les cellules tumorales d'un patient atteint d'un cancer du poumon métastatique. Une première réalisée dans le cadre d'un essai clinique qui devrait inclure au total une dizaine de patients en situation d'échec thérapeutique. L'essai a été autorisé au mois de juillet 2016 par un comité d'éthique chinois. Concrètement, les chercheurs ont prélevé des cellules du système immunitaire, les lymphocytes T, et ont désactivé un gène spécifique avec Crispr-Cas9. Rendre à nouveau visibles les cellules tumorales L'essai commencé par l'équipe du Dr Lu You vise à supprimer le gène qui code la molécule PD-1 (programmed cell death), une protéine qui se trouve à la surface des lymphocytes T.

Sans titre. Genetically Engineered Bacteria Could Help Tackle Obesity. People may dislike the idea, but genetically modified bacteria are an incredibly useful scientific tool.

Genetically Engineered Bacteria Could Help Tackle Obesity

By inserting genes for desirable molecules, scientists can convert the organisms into mini-factories that churn out useful therapeutics like insulin and antiviral proteins. Engineered Viruses Could Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria. In the war against antibiotic resistance, which threatens to send medicine spiraling back into the dark ages, scientists are racing to try and find desperately needed replacements before an extra 10 million people worldwide are killed each year due to the problem.

Engineered Viruses Could Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Although we’re still very dependent on antibiotics, some promising alternatives have been proposed recently, and we may now have another on our hands. Scientists from Tel Aviv University (TAU), Israel, have engineered viruses in such a way that they not only seek and kill bacteria, but also destroy antibiotic resistance in the bugs they target, rendering them susceptible to drugs. According to the researchers, viruses designed using this novel strategy could have a place in hand sanitizers or cleaning fluids to prevent the spread of drug-resistant microbes in hospitals and other clinical settings, which are hotspots for these life-threatening pathogens. The second phage, called a “temperate” phage, was a little more special. Modified HIV Cures Rare Genetic Disorder In Children. HIV may still be on a global rampage, but at least scientists are attempting to make good out of a bad situation.

Modified HIV Cures Rare Genetic Disorder In Children

This virus, and its relatives, has the ability to permanently insert its own DNA into our genome, which is extremely bad news for our cells and also the main reason that AIDS remains incurable. But scientists are using this deadly skill to their advantage, realizing the potential of exploiting these viruses in order to add in therapeutic genes to diseased cells, a budding technique known as gene therapy. News Highlights:CRISPR-Edited Human Embryos Raise Ruckus. Blurring an ethical line, scientists at Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou have used the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing system not on human adult cells or animal embryos, as has been done on many occasions, but on human embryos.

News Highlights:CRISPR-Edited Human Embryos Raise Ruckus

To date, scientists have been reluctant to edit human germline cells for fear of passing the revisions—and unknown consequences of those revisions—down to future generations. The Chinese scientists, however, advanced where others had hesitated, having taken the precaution of working with human embryos that they had deemed nonviable. If the scientists expected to escape controversy, they were mistaken. Concerns and protests have been rising since the scientists’ work appeared April 18 in the journal Protein & Cell. Dr. Genetically Engineered Bacteria Could Help Tackle Obesity. “Organs-on-a-Chip” Aim to Eliminate Animal Testing from Drug Research. “Organs-on-a-Chip” Aim to Eliminate Animal Testing from Drug Research.

“Organs-on-a-Chip” Aim to Eliminate Animal Testing from Drug Research

Improved Anti-HIV Antibodies Created Through Genetic Engineering. Many viruses have hundreds of protein ‘spikes’ on their surface that Y-shaped antibodies are able to grab with both ‘arms’ in order to attack it.

Improved Anti-HIV Antibodies Created Through Genetic Engineering

HIV, however, only has about 20 spikes which are sparsely arranged on the surface. If the antibody latches on with one arm, it has a difficult time finding another one within reach. Not only is the antibody unable to function properly and attack the virus without a firm grasp, but the decreased efficacy also makes it easier for the virus to evolve and negate the antibody’s efforts entirely. These factors might be contributing to HIV’s virulence. Galimidi’s team circumvented this obstacle by genetically engineering antibodies that allow both arms to latch onto a single spike. Genetically Modified Bacteria Could Prevent Obesity. Despite what Dr.

Genetically Modified Bacteria Could Prevent Obesity

Oz may have told you, there aren’t any miraculous supplements that will give any long-term weight loss benefits. At this point, there aren’t even very many FDA-approved medications that effectively treat obesity and related metabolic diseases. However, a group of researchers led by Sean Davies of Vanderbilt University have genetically altered bacteria that reside in the gut, and have been shown to prevent weight gain, even over a month after the treatment ended. The results of the study have been published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. Experimental Ebola Treatment Produced In Genetically Modified Plants. Injecting Bacteria Can Shrink Tumors. Artificial virus improves delivery of new generations of pharmaceuticals. Researchers from Wageningen UR, together with colleagues from the University of Leiden, Eindhoven University of Technology and Radboud University Nijmegen, have successfully developed an artificial virus.

Artificial virus improves delivery of new generations of pharmaceuticals

This virus can potentially be used for the delivery of new generations of pharmaceuticals, consisting of large biomolecules, by 'packaging' them in a natural fashion and delivering them to diseased cells. The artificial virus was designed according to new theoretical insights into how viruses operate and offers prospects for the delivery of pharmaceuticals, write the researchers in the latest online edition of Nature Nanotechnology. In particular, the researchers believe that the artificial virus technology could be potentially useful for gene therapy. Traditional pharmaceuticals consist of relatively small molecules that typically end up at the desired location without too much trouble. Artificial viral coat proteins Research team. Hadyn Parry: Re-engineering mosquitos to fight disease. Synthetic virology: Andrew Hessel at TEDxDanubia 2014.