The Sietch & All In Perspective
Crazy Egg & visualize your visitor

Crazy Egg & visualize your visitor

Over 200,000 businesses Convert Better with Crazy Egg, The Original Heatmapping Technology A heatmap is an easy way to understand what users want, care about and do on your site by visually representing their clicks - which are the strongest indicators of visitor motivation and desire. A Crazy Egg heatmap lets you collect more than 88% of the data you would using a traditional eye-tracking process.
Installation - Cover
Art of Science Competition / 2006 Gallery In the spring of 2006 we again asked the Princeton University community to submit images—and, for the first time, videos and sounds—produced in the course of research or incorporating tools and concepts from science. Out of nearly 150 entries from 16 departments, we selected 56 works to appear in the 2006 Art of Science exhibition. The practices of science and art both involve the single-minded pursuit of those moments of discovery when what one perceives suddenly becomes more than the sum of its parts. Art of Science Competition / 2006 Gallery
RANDOMANIA.net --
International Networks Archive \\ Remappin International Networks Archive \\ Remappin The following six maps deal with an array of major current world issues, from the serious to the seriously frivolous. They were developed for the INA by Jonathan Harris of Flaming Toast Productions. The maps may not be reproduced or rebroadcast without express written consent of the INA. If you are interested in using the maps, please contact us. Click maps to enlarge them.
You're going to need: Linux (or some other OS if you know how to compile Quake II itself and the X11 software renderer) - I'd love to make a Windows version but I know nothing about programming graphics under Windows Quake II source from id Software's FTP or one of the mirrors (q2source-3.21.zip) my modifications (red-blue-quake2-0.1.tar.gz) red-blue "3D" glasses (like these) original Quake II game content (the *.pak files) - the engine is under the GPL, the game content is not! Then perform the following commands: Quake II for red-blue 3D glasse Quake II for red-blue 3D glasse
verschiedene Weltkugeln - by trashhero.ch
Here is an ordinary map of the world: Click on image for a larger version Roughly speaking, on a map like this, the sizes of the countries of the world are in proportion to their actual sizes on the surface of the planet and their shapes are the same as their actual shapes. (This is only approximate though, since some distortion is inevitable when you go from a spherical planet to a flat map.) It's possible, however, and sometimes very useful, to redraw the map with the sizes of countries made bigger or smaller in order to represent something of interest. Such maps are called cartograms and can be an effective and natural way of portraying geographic or social data.

Images of the social and economic world

Images of the social and economic world
What the Internet really looks like
the Fourth Dimension Using Col MLI Home → Mathematics → Visualizing the Fourth Dimension Using Color But what about dimension 8½? Color can be used for more than exploring special relativity. Assigning color to every point on a surface is a way to envision higher dimensions. Let's start with a simple example: a disc with concentric colors. the Fourth Dimension Using Col
PeriodicTable/Posters/Pos...
Smoot Cosmology Group
AS&Image Library
SunBurst Page SunBurst Page John was recently named to be an IEEE Fellow, effective Jan. 2014. In November, John was appointed as an Honorary Professor in the School of Computer Science at the Univ. of St. Andrews in Scotland.
We all know that Quicksort is one of the fastest algorithms for sorting. It's not often, however, that we get a chance to see exactly how fast Quicksort really is. The following applets chart the progress of several common sorting algorithms while sorting an array of data using in-place algorithms. This means that the algorithms do not allocate additional storage to hold temporary results: they sort the data in place. (This is inspired by the algorithm animation work at Brown University and the video Sorting out Sorting By Ronald Baecker from the University of Toronto (circa 1970!).) Some of these sorts are very stupid or very slow and should not be used in code. Sorting Algorithms Demo Sorting Algorithms Demo
International Networks Archive / Map of th
TCS Daily - A Tale of Two Map The now familiar map of the United States, separated into red and blue states , makes the point, graphically, that the coastal population centers tend to vote Democratic while fly-over country leans Republican. Unfortunately, the map's binary either/or electoral college nature overestimates the philosophical division within the country while failing to show the extraordinary degree to which Americans' voting behavior reflects the degree to which their own neighborhoods are more or less crowded. A far better illustration, devised by Princeton University mathematician Robert Vanderbei, uses shades of purple to indicate the spectrum of election preferences within counties. TCS Daily - A Tale of Two Map

International Networks Archive \\ Remappin

The following six maps deal with an array of major current world issues, from the serious to the seriously frivolous. They were developed for the INA by Jonathan Harris of Flaming Toast Productions. The maps may not be reproduced or rebroadcast without express written consent of the INA. If you are interested in using the maps, please contact us. Click maps to enlarge them. International Networks Archive \\ Remappin
ymmetry - October 2005 - gallery: jan-hen Designer Jan-Henrik Andersen, in conjunction with particle physicists, developed a visual language that describes the interrelationships between the elementary particles, both known and hypothesized. by Elizabeth Wade Few facets of nature are more mysterious than the quantum world. Particles that appear and disappear from nothing, interactions governed by probability, and intrinsic uncertainties are enough to baffle even the most experienced scientist. Making these ideas even more difficult to grasp is the fact that no one can ever hope to see a particle—in fact, particles may not even have "looks" at all. Undeterred by these challenges, industrial designer Jan-Henrik Andersen set out to create a visual guide that anyone, from particle physicists to high school students, could use to navigate the quantum universe.
thomas/computer/programs/useless/...
music, photography and more..
Animusic - Pipe Dream - Google Video
DVD Info & Clip
parklines - data visualization &visual cu
An Atlas of Cyberspaces - Topology Map
The Internet Life
Innovis Home
backchannel by stamen
- Juice Analytics
Enterprise Decision Management - a Weblog