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02GoodTimesiGetHigh(1) 10 Mind-Blowing Theories That Will Change Your Perception of the World. Reality is not as obvious and simple as we like to think.

10 Mind-Blowing Theories That Will Change Your Perception of the World

Some of the things that we accept as true at face value are notoriously wrong. Scientists and philosophers have made every effort to change our common perceptions of it. The 10 examples below will show you what I mean. 1. Great glaciation. 10 Mind-Blowing Theories That Will Change Your Perception of the World. 11 Most Important Philosophical Quotations.

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11 Most Important Philosophical Quotations

“The unexamined life is not worth living” – Socrates (470-399 BCE) Socrates’ [wiki] belief that we must reflect upon the life we live was partly inspired by the famous phrase inscribed at the shrine of the oracle at Delphi, “Know thyself.” The key to finding value in the prophecies of the oracle was self-knowledge, not a decoder ring. Socrates felt so passionately about the value of self-examination that he closely examined not only his own beliefs and values but those of others as well. More precisely, through his relentless questioning, he forced people to examine their own beliefs. 2. Commonly known as Ockham’s razor, the idea here is that in judging among competing philosophical or scientific theories, all other things being equal, we should prefer the simplest theory.

8 Great Philosophical Questions That We'll Never Solve. 8 Great Philosophical Questions That We'll Never Solve. 8 Great Philosophical Questions That We'll Never Solve. A Spiritual Mystery: Does God Listen to Prayers? (Part 2)  To say that prayers are answered isn't the same as saying that God answers prayers.

A Spiritual Mystery: Does God Listen to Prayers? (Part 2) 

In the first case, a thought manifests as reality. You wish, intend, or ask for an outcome, and the outcome appears. In the second case, a supernatural being in the sky listens to millions of requests every day and kindly responds to a few while turning his back on the vast majority. The first post in this series was devoted to a consciousness-based explanation for prayers as opposed to a religious explanation. The question automatically arises: If answered and unanswered prayers have a basis in our own awareness, what creates the difference? On the other hand, consciousness is undoubtedly real. Yet the reach of the supernatural is actually quite arbitrary from culture to culture. We live in a universe that is radically different from what our eyes and ears perceive, and one major difference is known as "non-locality. " This brings us back to prayers. (To be cont.) Ask a Philosopher: Questions and Answers 23 (1st series) Ask a Philosopher: Questions and Answers 23 (1st series)

Ask a Philosopher: Questions and Answers 23 (1st series)

Rhetoric (Aristotle) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Aristotle's Rhetoric (Greek: Ῥητορική; Latin: Rhetorica) is an ancient Greek treatise on the art of persuasion, dating from the 4th century BC.

Rhetoric (Aristotle) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rhetoric - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Painting depicting a lecture in a knight academy, painted by Pieter Isaacsz or Reinhold Timm for Rosenborg Castle as part of a series of seven paintings depicting the seven independent arts. This painting illustrates rhetorics. From Ancient Greece to the late 19th century, it was a central part of Western education, filling the need to train public speakers and writers to move audiences to action with arguments.[4] The word is derived from the Greek ῥητορικός (rhētorikós), "oratorical",[5] from ῥήτωρ (rhḗtōr), "public speaker",[6] related to ῥῆμα (rhêma), "that which is said or spoken, word, saying",[7] and ultimately derived from the verb ἐρῶ (erō), "say, speak".[8] Uses of rhetoric[edit] Scope of rhetoric[edit] Scholars have debated the scope of rhetoric since ancient times.

Because the ancient Greeks highly valued public political participation, rhetoric emerged as a crucial tool to influence politics. However, since the time of Aristotle, logic has changed. Top 10 Philosophical One Liners. Miscellaneous Philosophy is no more or less than the search for wisdom.

Top 10 Philosophical One Liners

It deals with all manner of problems which everyone faces in their lives, and by thought and logic attempts to solve them. Since we live in a terrifically complex universe lots of philosophy is itself, very complex. Modern academic philosophy can be almost impenetrable to an outsider, and anything not couched in the terms of the academic philosopher is considered simple musing. However, philosophy has thankfully provided lots of short, pithy philosophical statements to ponder. You cannot step in the same river twice.

Heraclitus of Ephesus, also known as the Weeping Philosopher and Heraclitus the Obscure, has left us only a few philosophical sentences. Death need not concern us because when we exist death does not, and when death exists we do not. Epicurus and Epicureanism, has suffered for many years from a misapprehension about what his philosophy teaches. God is dead. Zeno's paradoxes. Zeno's arguments are perhaps the first examples of a method of proof called reductio ad absurdum also known as proof by contradiction.

Zeno's paradoxes

They are also credited as a source of the dialectic method used by Socrates.[3] Some mathematicians and historians, such as Carl Boyer, hold that Zeno's paradoxes are simply mathematical problems, for which modern calculus provides a mathematical solution.[4] Some philosophers, however, say that Zeno's paradoxes and their variations (see Thomson's lamp) remain relevant metaphysical problems.[5][6][7] The origins of the paradoxes are somewhat unclear. Diogenes Laertius, a fourth source for information about Zeno and his teachings, citing Favorinus, says that Zeno's teacher Parmenides was the first to introduce the Achilles and the tortoise paradox.