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Masters of Love. Every day in June, the most popular wedding month of the year, about 13,000 American couples will say “I do,” committing to a lifelong relationship that will be full of friendship, joy, and love that will carry them forward to their final days on this earth.

Masters of Love

Except, of course, it doesn’t work out that way for most people. The majority of marriages fail, either ending in divorce and separation or devolving into bitterness and dysfunction. Of all the people who get married, only three in ten remain in healthy, happy marriages, as psychologist Ty Tashiro points out in his book The Science of Happily Ever After, which was published earlier this year. Social scientists first started studying marriages by observing them in action in the 1970s in response to a crisis: Married couples were divorcing at unprecedented rates. Psychologist John Gottman was one of those researchers. From the data they gathered, Gottman separated the couples into two major groups: the masters and the disasters. The Irrational User – Startup Grind – Medium. The human mind is a wonderfully complex thinking machine.

The Irrational User – Startup Grind – Medium

We’ve developed written language, built skyscrapers, and discovered quantum physics through our collective ability to plan and reason. But despite our intellect and like all earthly creatures, the mental circuitry of our biological ancestors had been optimized by evolution for a world where timeliness was more valuable than accuracy. Optimizations often present tradeoffs. In many modern decision-making contexts, humans are predictably irrational. Many studies have empirically demonstrated these types of systematic deviations, which are also known as cognitive biases or mental fallacies. The next two sections provide some background on cognitive biases. Some background Intellectual movements that led to the Enlightenment fetishized the human mind as a perfectly rational entity, capable of reasoning the very existence of God himself.

The love of a parasite is worth nothing. In May of 1948, author Ayn Rand received a letter from a fan named Joanne Rondeau.

The love of a parasite is worth nothing

Native Intelligence. On March 22, 1621, a Native American delegation walked through what is now southern New England to meet with a group of foreigners who had taken over a recently deserted Indian settlement.

Native Intelligence

At the head of the party was an uneasy triumvirate: Massasoit, the sachem (political-military leader) of the Wampanoag confederation, a loose coalition of several dozen villages that controlled most of southeastern Massachusetts; Samoset, sachem of an allied group to the north; and Tisquantum, a distrusted captive, whom Massasoit had brought along only reluctantly as an interpreter. Massasoit was an adroit politician, but the dilemma he faced would have tested Machiavelli. About five years before, most of his subjects had fallen before a terrible calamity. Whole villages had been depopulated. It was all Massasoit could do to hold together the remnants of his people. Europeans had been visiting New England for at least a century. How the 24-hour society is stealing time from the night. Burmese monks know that it is time to get up when it is light enough to see the veins in their hands.

How the 24-hour society is stealing time from the night

Media Expert Dan Gillmor: Why Journalists Must Be Activists. I’m glad to be here with you today in Barcelona.

Media Expert Dan Gillmor: Why Journalists Must Be Activists

This is one of my favorites cities and regions, for many reasons that go far beyond the great people and food and remarkable things to see. There’s a spirit of political and economic innovation here that inspires me—and many others around the world. It is a special honor to be at this Congress of Catalonian journalists. Journalists are among the people who inspire me the most—most of all when they’re doing their work with persistence and integrity.

I was planning to show you some slides. The Value of Grey Thinking. One of the most common questions we receive, unsurprisingly, is along the lines of What one piece of advice would you recommend to become a better thinker? The question is kind of cheating. There is, of course, no one thing, and if Farnam Street is a testament to any idea, it’s that you must pull from many disciplines to achieve overall wisdom. No truly great thinker is siloed in a small territory. But a common experience tends to occur as you rid yourself of ideology and narrowness, as you venture deeper and deeper into unfamiliar territory; and it’s worth thinking about it ahead of time. It goes by many names, but a fair one might be Grey Thinking. The Black-and-White Swan Children love torturing their parents and teachers with the relentless Why? Leisure, the Basis of Culture: An Obscure German Philosopher’s Timely 1948 Manifesto for Reclaiming Our Human Dignity in a Culture of Workaholism.

“We get such a kick out of looking forward to pleasures and rushing ahead to meet them that we can’t slow down enough to enjoy them when they come,” Alan Watts observed in 1970, aptly declaring us “a civilization which suffers from chronic disappointment.”

Leisure, the Basis of Culture: An Obscure German Philosopher’s Timely 1948 Manifesto for Reclaiming Our Human Dignity in a Culture of Workaholism

Two millennia earlier, Aristotle asserted: “This is the main question, with what activity one’s leisure is filled.” Today, in our culture of productivity-fetishism, we have succumbed to the tyrannical notion of “work/life balance” and have come to see the very notion of “leisure” not as essential to the human spirit but as self-indulgent luxury reserved for the privileged or deplorable idleness reserved for the lazy.