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ONCOLOGIA INTEGRATIVA

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New Cancer Treatments - Independent Cancer Research Foundation, Inc.              EVIDENCE BASED NATURAL HEALTH - Home. Welcome to the Natural Medicines Research Collaboration. Integrative Oncology Guidelines. The SIO Clinical Practice Guidelines are referenced in MedLine and are posted on the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health website ( The SIO Clinical Practice Guidelines are the only comprehensive evidence-based guidelines for incorporating complementary and integrative therapies into conventional oncology clinical practice.

Integrative Oncology Guidelines

The published guidelines are available for FREE. Clinical Practice Guidelines. Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology Impact Factor on ResearchGate - Impact Factor Rankings (2013, 2014 and 2015) Journal description.

Journal of the Society for Integrative Oncology Impact Factor on ResearchGate - Impact Factor Rankings (2013, 2014 and 2015)

Academic Health Centers and the Growth of Integrative Medicine. Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Use of Integrative Therapies as Supportive Care in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer. Rationale and Importance Worldwide, an estimated 33%–47% of individuals diagnosed with cancer use complementary, alternative, or integrative therapies during cancer treatment (1).

Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Use of Integrative Therapies as Supportive Care in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

Women with breast cancer are among the highest users of such therapies and usage has been increasing (2–7). An estimated 48%–80% of North American breast cancer survivors use complementary and integrative therapies following diagnosis (2,4,5,8–12). Clear clinical practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about the evidence supporting or discouraging the use of specific complementary and integrative therapies for defined outcomes during and beyond breast cancer treatment, including symptom management. Definitions. Advancing the Evidence Base and Transforming Cancer Care Through Interprofessional Collegiality: The Society for Integrative Oncology. + Author Affiliations Correspondence to: Susan Bauer-Wu, PhD, RN, FAAN, School of Nursing, University of Virginia, 225 Jeanette Lancaster Way, Charlottesville, VA 22903–3388 (e-mail: bauer-wu@virginia.edu).

Advancing the Evidence Base and Transforming Cancer Care Through Interprofessional Collegiality: The Society for Integrative Oncology

The Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO) is pleased to support this seminal issue of JNCI Monographs devoted to integrative oncology and cancer survivorship. The SIO is an international professional society whose mission is to advance evidence-based, comprehensive integrative health care to improve the lives of people affected by cancer (www.integrativeonc.org). Since its founding in 2003 by pioneers in the field—Drs Barrie Cassileth, David Rosenthal, and Lorenzo Cohen—SIO has consistently encouraged rigorous scientific evaluation of both pre-clinical and clinical science, while advocating for the transformation of oncology care to integrate evidence-based complementary approaches. “Integrative oncology”: The Trojan horse that is quackademic medicine infiltrates ASCO « Science-Based Medicine. You might have noticed that I didn’t produce a post last week, something that’s unusual for me, given how prolific I have been in the blogosphere.

“Integrative oncology”: The Trojan horse that is quackademic medicine infiltrates ASCO « Science-Based Medicine

One reason was personal. The other reason was that last weekend I was attending the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago. I also must confess that, while I was there, I caused a bit of a stir on the meeting hashtag (#ASCO14) in the name of science-based medicine (SBM) on Twitter under my handle @gorskon. (What? You aren’t following me on Twitter? Of course, it was for just that reason that I was making a bit of a stir on Twitter. There were three presenters and a panel discussion. Dr.

Dr. National Cancer Institute’s Support of Research to Further Integrative Oncology Practice. Jeffrey D.

National Cancer Institute’s Support of Research to Further Integrative Oncology Practice

White + Author Affiliations Correspondence to: Jeffrey D. NCCAM Criticism from a Not-Quite-Opponent « Science-Based Medicine. The demographic of SBM readers are likely to remember the early Miller Lite beer television commercials where sports personalities debated as to whether the beverage “tastes great” or was “less filling.”

NCCAM Criticism from a Not-Quite-Opponent « Science-Based Medicine

In one classic version, New York Mets’ Marv Throneberry breaks the shouting match to level his decision: “I feel strongly both ways.” My colleagues at Science-Based Medicine have generally been opposed completely to the existence of the NIH’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM). The primary objection is that the Center awards roughly $125 million per year in taxpayer dollars to studies that are generally not based on a strong scientific foundation or, in some cases, absolutely no scientific basis. On the other hand, the best NCCAM-supported studies have provided fruitful results, if not negative with regard to clinical outcomes. Co-opting classical pharmacognosy as alternative medicine I sought to investigate whether complex St. Dr. Premature clinical trials. Advancing the Science of Integrative Oncology to Inform Patient-Centered Care for Cancer Survivors.

+ Author Affiliations Correspondence to: Jun J.

Advancing the Science of Integrative Oncology to Inform Patient-Centered Care for Cancer Survivors

Mao, MD, MSCE, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania, 227 Blockley Hall, 423 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6021 (e-mail: jun.mao@uphs.upenn.edu). Cancer survivors, millions in number, often struggle to manage the physical as well as emotional, social, and spiritual consequences of their cancer and its necessary conventional treatments (1). Many individuals, like Josh Mailman (2), choose to incorporate complementary and integrative medicine therapies such as meditation, acupuncture, yoga, and diet into their cancer treatment with the goal of gaining a sense of control and being more active participants in their care.

By doing so, they seek to improve their outcomes, including reducing the side effects of conventional cancer treatments and improving their quality of life and survival. Building the Evidence Base for Integrative Approaches to Care of Cancer Survivors. Josephine Briggs + Author Affiliations.

Building the Evidence Base for Integrative Approaches to Care of Cancer Survivors

The Evidence Base for Integrative Approaches to Cancer Care. The most recent issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute Monographs features a series of articles on the role of integrative oncology in cancer survivorship.

The Evidence Base for Integrative Approaches to Cancer Care

I was pleased to have been invited to write a perspectives piece for this issue on building the evidence base for integrative approaches to the care of cancer survivors. Integrative oncology is a relatively new movement, and the research is in early stages. But due in part to patient demand for a more “holistic” approach to care as well as the desire of physicians to develop a style of practice that will facilitate changed relationships with patients, with more emphasis on healing and less on technical advice, the movement, along with the evidence base, is growing. Cell. Integrative oncology: really the best of both worlds? : Nature Reviews Cancer. Table of Contents — November 2014, 2014 (50)