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Ecopsychology

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Theconversation. The summer break is well underway.

theconversation

The weather is warming and kids are getting used to some time away from school. Parents, meanwhile, are trying to find ways to keep the kids entertained over the break. Chances are you remember your own childhood summers full of adventures outdoors in some plot of green near your home. Perhaps you had cubby houses or made cakes out of mud or just ran around seeking shade under the nearest tree.

For this generation, not only have changes in families’ lifestyles resulted in children spending much less time outdoors than in previous generations, but many children prefer to spend time indoors playing electronic games, rather than getting out in nature. In fact, the majority of children spend more than the recommended maximum of two hours per day involved in “screen time”. But there are plenty of physical and mental benefits to outdoor time for children.

A Melbourne Natural Playground Named Australia’s Best Playground. A Melbourne children's playground designed to encourage risk-taking - through rocky outcropped terraces and lofty climbing ropes - has been crowned the nation's best.

A Melbourne Natural Playground Named Australia’s Best Playground

It is known as Nature Play and sits in Royal Park, next to the Royal Children's Hospital. It was designed to help kids - inner city ones especially, who were spending so little time in nature - find an element of unpredictable play. School's Out: Lessons from a Forest Kindergarten. School's Out: Lessons from a Forest Kindergarten. Why a walk in the woods really does help your body and your soul. Hug a tree – the evidence shows it really will make you feel better. We know that trees have many benefits.

Hug a tree – the evidence shows it really will make you feel better

In forests they provide habitat, wood, biodiversity and ecosystem services. In cities, they can mitigate the urban heat island effect by cooling the air and reducing greenhouse gases. But, perhaps surprisingly, there is increasing evidence that trees are also good for our mental health. Are we all tree-huggers? The idea that humans are intimately connected to the earth has persisted throughout human history and across cultures. Hug a tree – the evidence shows it really will make you feel better. Written by Shelby Gull Laird We know that trees have many benefits.

Hug a tree – the evidence shows it really will make you feel better

In forests they provide habitat, wood, biodiversity and ecosystem services. In cities, they can mitigate the urban heat island effect by cooling the air and reducing greenhouse gases. But, perhaps surprisingly, there is increasing evidence that trees are also good for our mental health. National Museum of Mathematics. Theconversation. [ WILD ONES ] - Jon Mooallem - The Internet Page!

Beatrix Potter, Mycologist: The Beloved Children’s Book Author’s Little-Known Scientific Studies and Illustrations of Mushrooms. Spiritual Ecology & Universal Sufism. Manningham City Council. Walking is Manningham's most popular recreation activity because: It's a great way to be activeIt's freeIt's a more social way of travellingYou can do it anywhere at any timeYou don't need any equipment other than a pair of shoesIt's a sustainable way of getting aroundIt doesn't matter your age, pace, whether you're on your own or in a group, heading somewhere or nowhere in particularIt's the best value form of exercise for the prevention (and cure) of many major health problems including obesity, diabetes, cardio-vascular disease and more.

Manningham City Council

For more information, visit the Victoria Walks "WhyWalk" webpage. Walking Guides We have prepared a new suite of walking guides that showcases the city’s wealth of natural, historical, cultural and environmental assets. Offering walks from Bulleen to Wonga Park and everywhere in between, the guides include detailed maps as well as interesting and informative notes to enhance your walking experience. Guidebook - Kids in Nature Australia. Noise pollution is making us oblivious to the sound of nature, says researcher. The tranquil chorus of the natural world is in danger of being lost to today’s generation as people screen out the noises that surround them, a senior US researcher warns.

Noise pollution is making us oblivious to the sound of nature, says researcher

Rising levels of background noise in some areas threaten to make people oblivious to the uplifting sounds of birdsong, trickling water, and trees rustling in the wind, which can often be heard even in urban centres, said Kurt Fristrup, a senior scientist at the US National Park Service. The problem was exacerbated by people listening to iPods through their earphones instead of tuning in to the birds and other sounds of nature that can easily be drowned out by traffic, music and others noises, he said. “This learned deafness is a real issue,” Fristrup told the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in San Jose. AABAT Inc.

Can you put a price on the beauty of the natural world? George Orwell warned that "the logical end of mechanical progress is to reduce the human being to something resembling a brain in a bottle".

Can you put a price on the beauty of the natural world?

This is a story of how it happens. Welcome To OASES. Spiritual Ecology. Spiritual Ecology. Alaska's indigenous game Never Alone teaches co-operation through stories. Kids these days, eh?

Alaska's indigenous game Never Alone teaches co-operation through stories

TreeHugger. Last weekend I went on a camping trip with my family to Gatineau Park in Québec.

TreeHugger

The first night went well, but then the rain came. Sorry, gym rats: Why exercising outside may be better for your health. Health Advisor is a regular column where contributors share their knowledge in fields ranging from fitness to psychology, pediatrics to aging.

Sorry, gym rats: Why exercising outside may be better for your health

Follow us @Globe_Health. Now that the weather is blissful, I hope that you’re finding it a bit easier to get outside and be more active. If you are increasing your exercise and activity, that’s great; more physical activity will help your muscles, blood, heart and lungs – pretty much everything in your body. Nature Playgrounds. Tired of boring old playgrounds? Why not build a nature playground? How green cities are better for us physically and psychologically. Root Gorelick is cagey about sharing details of his work commute; he doesn’t want a sudden uptick in early-morning traffic scaring off the otters. Or the minks and duck families. To get to his office in the biology building at Carleton University, Prof.