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The WELL. The Whole Earth 'Lectronic Link, normally shortened to The WELL, is one of the oldest virtual communities in continuous operation.


As of June 2012, it had 2,693 members.[2] It is best known for its Internet forums, but also provides email, shell accounts, and web pages. The discussion and topics on the WELL range from deeply serious to trivial, depending on the nature and interests of the participants. History[edit] In August 2005 Salon Media Group announced that it was looking for a buyer for the WELL, in order to concentrate on other business lines. In November 2006, a press release of The WELL said, "As Salon has not found a suitable purchaser, it has determined that it is currently in the best interest of the company to retain this business and has therefore suspended all efforts to sell The WELL. 8-Circuit Model of Consciousness. The eight-circuit model of consciousness is a theory proposed by Timothy Leary and expanded on by Robert Anton Wilson and Antero Alli.

8-Circuit Model of Consciousness

The model describes eight circuits of information (eight "brains") that operate within the human nervous system. Each circuit is concerned with a different sphere of activity. Akashic records. Background[edit] Akasha is a Sanskrit word meaning "sky", "space" or "aether", and it entered the language of theosophy through H.

Akashic records

P. Blavatsky, who characterized it as a sort of life force; she also referred to "indestructible tablets of the astral light" recording both the past and future of human thought and action, but she did not explicitly identify these as "akashic" in nature.[1] The notion of an akashic record is attributed to Alfred Percy Sinnett, who, in his book Esoteric Buddhism (1884), wrote of a Buddhist belief in "a permanency of records in the Akasa" and "the potential capacity of man to read the same. "[2][1] By C. Boogiepop Phantom. Brain–computer interface.

A brain–computer interface (BCI), sometimes called a mind-machine interface (MMI), direct neural interface (DNI), synthetic telepathy interface (STI) or brain–machine interface (BMI), is a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device.

Brain–computer interface

BCIs are often directed at assisting, augmenting, or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions. Research on BCIs began in the 1970s at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) under a grant from the National Science Foundation, followed by a contract from DARPA.[1][2] The papers published after this research also mark the first appearance of the expression brain–computer interface in scientific literature. Carl Jung. Carl Gustav Jung (/jʊŋ/; German: [ˈkarl ˈɡʊstaf jʊŋ]; 26 July 1875 – 6 June 1961), often referred to as C.

Carl Jung

G. Jung, was a Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist who founded analytical psychology.[2] Collective unconscious. Collective unconscious is a term of analytical psychology, coined by Carl Jung.

Collective unconscious

Deus ex machina. Deus ex machina (pronounced [ˈdeus eks ˈmaː.kʰ], /ˈdeɪ.əs ɛks ˈmɑːkiːnə/ or /ˈdiːəs ɛks ˈmækɨnə/[1]; from Latin, meaning "god from the machine"; plural: dei ex machina) is a plot device whereby a seemingly unsolvable problem is suddenly and abruptly resolved by the contrived and unexpected intervention of some new event, character, ability or object.

Deus ex machina

Depending on how it is done, it can be intended to move the story forward when the writer has "painted themself into a corner" and sees no other way out, to surprise the audience, to bring the tale to a happy ending, or as a comedic device. Origin of the expression[edit] Douglas Rushkoff. Douglas Rushkoff (born 18 February 1961) is an American media theorist, writer, columnist, lecturer, graphic novelist, and documentarian.

Douglas Rushkoff

He is best known for his association with the early cyberpunk culture, and his advocacy of open source solutions to social problems. Rushkoff is most frequently regarded as a media theorist and is known for coining terms and concepts including viral media (or media virus), digital native, and social currency. Rushkoff currently teaches in the Media Studies department at The New School University in Manhattan.[7] He has previously lectured at the ITP at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts and taught a class called Narrative Lab.[8] He also has taught online for the MaybeLogic Academy.[9] Biography[edit] Background[edit] Earth's magnetic field. Computer simulation of the Earth's field in a period of normal polarity between reversals.[1] The lines represent magnetic field lines, blue when the field points towards the center and yellow when away.

Earth's magnetic field

The rotation axis of the Earth is centered and vertical. The dense clusters of lines are within the Earth's core.[2] The North Magnetic Pole wanders sufficiently slowly to keep ordinary compasses useful for navigation. At random intervals, however, averaging around several hundred thousand years, the Earth's field reverses and the North and South Magnetic Poles switch places. These reversals of the geomagnetic poles leave a record in rocks that allow paleomagnetists to calculate past motions of continents and ocean floors as a result of plate tectonics.

Electrical grid. General layout of electricity networks.

Electrical grid

Voltages and depictions of electrical lines are typical for Germany and other European systems. An electrical grid (also referred to as an electricity grid or electric grid) is an interconnected network for delivering electricity from suppliers to consumers. Extremely low frequency. 1982 aerial view of the U.S. Navy Clam Lake, Wisconsin ELF transmitter facility, used to communicate with deeply submerged submarines. Extremely low frequency (ELF) is the ITU designation[1] for electromagnetic radiation (radio waves) with frequencies from 3 to 30 Hz, and corresponding wavelengths from 100,000 to 10,000 kilometers.[2][3] In atmospheric science, an alternative definition is usually given, from 3 Hz to 3 kHz.[4][5] In the related magnetosphere science, the lower frequency electromagnetic oscillations (pulsations occurring below ~3 Hz) are considered to lie in the ULF range, which is thus also defined differently from the ITU radio bands.

Alternate definitions[edit] Military communications[edit] Explanation[edit] Because of its electrical conductivity, seawater shields submarines from most higher frequency radio waves, making radio communication with submerged submarines at ordinary frequencies impossible. Instrumentality of Mankind. In the science fiction of Cordwainer Smith, the Instrumentality of Mankind refers both to Smith's personal future history and universe and to the central government of humanity. The Instrumentality of Mankind is also the title of a paperback collection of short stories by Cordwainer Smith published in 1979 (now superseded by the later The Rediscovery of Man, which collects all of Smith's short stories).

Origin and history[edit] In the history of Cordwainer Smith's "Instrumentality" universe, the Instrumentality originated as the police force of the Jwindz or "perfect ones" on a post-nuclear-holocaust Earth. Characteristics[edit] John C. Lilly. John Cunningham Lilly (January 6, 1915 – September 30, 2001) was a American physician, neuroscientist, psychoanalyst, psychonaut, philosopher, writer and inventor. He was a researcher of the nature of consciousness using mainly isolation tanks,[1] dolphin communication, and psychedelic drugs, sometimes in combination. Early life and education[edit] John Lilly was born to a wealthy family on January 6, 1915, in Saint Paul, Minnesota.

Kabbalah. Majestic 12. The 1947 letter, purported to be signed by Harry Truman, authorizing "Operation Majestic Twelve". Indications of such a group's existence may have appeared in 1978 in declassified Canadian documents, though neither the term "MJ-12", nor any of its ascribed variations, was mentioned. Therefore, suggesting this Canadian document is in some way evidence of "MJ-12" is sheer speculation.

The first reference to a classified group called "MJ-Twelve" was discovered in a suspicious document dated in 1980. In this first appearance of what is now commonly called "MJ-12", the name was spelled out, not abbreviated. However, this document was later identified to be a hoax[citation needed] and attributed to United States Air Force Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI) Special Agent Richard Doty, who provided it to author William Moore for the purpose (according to Moore) of feeding disinformation to Paul Bennewitz, whom AFOSI was actively working to discredit.

Project Xanadu. Project Xanadu was the first hypertext project, founded in 1960 by Ted Nelson. Administrators of Project Xanadu have declared it an improvement over the World Wide Web, with mission statement: "Today's popular software simulates paper. The World Wide Web (another imitation of paper) trivialises our original hypertext model with one-way ever-breaking links and no management of version or contents. "[1] History[edit] Roswell UFO incident. Schumann resonances. Animation of Schumann resonance in Earth's atmosphere.

Serial Experiments Lain. Serial Experiments Lain (シリアルエクスペリメンツレイン Shiriaru Ekusuperimentsu Rein), is an anime series directed by Ryutaro Nakamura, original character design by Yoshitoshi ABe, screenplay written by Chiaki J. Konaka, and produced by Yasuyuki Ueda (credited as production 2nd) for Triangle Staff. It was broadcast on TV Tokyo from July to September 1998. A PlayStation game with the same title was released in November 1998 by Pioneer LDC. Simulated reality. Ted Nelson. Biography[edit] Nelson is the son of Emmy Award-winning director Ralph Nelson and the Academy Award-winning actress Celeste Holm.[1] His parents' marriage was brief and he was mostly raised by his grandparents, first in Chicago and later in Greenwich Village.[2] Nelson earned a BA from Swarthmore College in 1959. The Rediscovery of Man. Timothy Leary.

Vannevar Bush. Vannevar Bush (/væˈniːvɑr/ van-NEE-var; March 11, 1890 – June 28, 1974) was an American engineer, inventor and science administrator, whose most important contribution was as head of the U.S. Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD) during World War II, through which almost all wartime military R&D was carried out, including initiation and early administration of the Manhattan Project.