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Ten Mythological Creatures In Ancient Folklore. THE REVISED IRISH ORIGINS OF CIVILISATION : LEYLINES DRUIDS AND STONE CIRCLES. The Witch Garter is worn in various rituals for it’s magical properties and they are also used as badges of rank amongst Witch Covens.

THE REVISED IRISH ORIGINS OF CIVILISATION : LEYLINES DRUIDS AND STONE CIRCLES

The use of garters can be traced back to Paleolithic times – so no wonder, then, that the highest honour bestowed by the British monarchy on a person is an invitation to join the ORDER OF THE (WITCH) GARTER which has an annual parade outside St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle in England every year. The exterior roof of the chapel is festooned with sculptures of ‘Yales’ which are unicorn-type mythological demonic creatures whose bodies are covered in circular markings. In Search of Ancient Ireland . Technology. By Carmel McCaffrey and Leo Eaton ometime in the fifth millennium B.C., new technology arrived in Ireland, carried by immigrants from Europe or native Irish who had learned new skills overseas.

In Search of Ancient Ireland . Technology

This marked the beginning of Irish agriculture, the ability to grow cereal crops and raise livestock. Grain and farm animals arrived by boat since neither was native to Ireland. The Irish quickly improved on their scientific knowledge: By 3500 B.C., Neolithic farmers were raising great stone tombs for their dead, and the greatest of these were passage tombs, passages of dressed stone leading to a corbel-roofed central burial chamber covered by a mound of earth or stone as much as 40 feet high. Many passage tombs were built on hilltops, towering over the surrounding countryside. Metal came first to Ireland around 2400 B.C. as the Bronze Age spread north from the Middle East. Not only were metal products hard to make, they were not practical; stone axes still worked better for everyday use. IRISH LITERATURE, MYTHOLOGY, FOLKLORE, AND DRAMA. Irish PlayographyIrish Writers OnlineStudy Ireland: Poetry - BBCIrish Women Writers - M.

IRISH LITERATURE, MYTHOLOGY, FOLKLORE, AND DRAMA

OckerbloomThe Irish and LiteratureLyra CelticaIreland Literature Guide2002 Irish Author RoundtablePoetry Ireland / Éigse ÉireannEarly Irish Lyric Poetry - Kuno Meyer Sonnets from Ireland - E. Blomquist Colum's Anthology of Irish Verse - Bartleby.com Medieval Celtic ManuscriptsThe Book of KellsCarmina GadelicaCELT Irish Electronic Texts Irish Writers OnlineIreland Literature ExchangeBibliography of 19th-c. Irish Literature - J.M. Jonathan SwiftJonathan Swift Biography - IncompetechGulliver's Travels Project - L. Bram StokerBram Stoker's DraculaBram Stoker - P.

Ireland. Sacred Texts: Legends and Sagas. Sacred-texts home Neo-Paganism Classical Mythology Lord of the RingsBuy CD-ROM Buy Books: Legends and Sagas General Northern European Arabia Baltic Basque Celtic Eastern European England Finland France Germany Greece Iceland Italy Persia Portugal Roma (Gypsy) Scandinavia Spain This section of sacred-texts archives the rich literature of Sagas and Legends.

Sacred Texts: Legends and Sagas

These are mostly (but not all) from Northern Europe, and primarily based on legendary events and people from the Middle Ages. Many of these narratives are based on archetypal stories that date even further back in time. General. Fables & Tales - Paper Portitude. IRISH LITERATURE, MYTHOLOGY, FOLKLORE, AND DRAMA. The Irish Tuatha Dé Dannan Connection to the Tribe of Dan. "It is certainly no coincidence that the Irish Gaelic word Dun or Dunn means "Judge," just as Dan does in Hebrew!

The Irish Tuatha Dé Dannan Connection to the Tribe of Dan

" - Raymond McNair. Stories for children, folktales, fairy tales and fables. Scottish Myths and Legends. Leabhair / Books from Cló Mhaigh Eo, Claremorris, County Mayo, Ireland. Irish mythology. Bunworth Banshee.

Irish mythology

Celtic Otherworld. In Celtic mythology, the Otherworld is the realm of the living and the home of the deities and other powerful spirits.

Celtic Otherworld

Tales and folklore refer to the Otherworld as "The Fortunate Isles" in the western sea, or at other times underground (such as in the Sídhe) or right alongside the world of the living, but invisible to most humans. The intrusion of the Otherworld into this one is signaled by the appearance of divine beings or unusual animals, or other phenomena such as sudden changes in the weather.[1] Sometimes an otherworldly woman will present an apple or an apple branch, or a ball of thread to follow as it unwinds.[1][2] Beliefs of the ancient Gauls[edit] In Lucan's account of the druidical doctrine of metempsychosis, the Otherworld is referred to as Orbis alius.[3] Graeco-Roman geographers[who?] Inuit Myth and Legend. Inuit mythology is a repository of Inuit culture, passed down by elders through generations to enrich and enlighten.

Inuit Myth and Legend

My Mother's Story By Solomon Karpik, 1987 (courtesy DINA/PAN 83PR87 29). Inuit mythology is a repository of Inuit culture, passed down by elders through generations to enrich and enlighten. Traditionally used in all aspects of daily life, Inuit mythology has undergone a resurgence in popularity as community groups aim to preserve traditional teachings as a method of cultural and political solidarity. Mythology and Legend The definition of a myth is as fluid as myths themselves. Celtic deities. The gods and goddesses of the pre-Christian Celtic peoples are known from a variety of sources, including written Celtic mythology, ancient places of worship, statues, engravings, cult objects and place or personal names.

Celtic deities

In characteristic Roman fashion, Caesar does not refer to these figures by their native names but by the names of the Roman gods with which he equated them, a procedure that greatly complicates the task of identifying his Gaulish deities with their counterparts in the insular literatures. He also presents a neat schematic equation of god and function that is quite foreign to the vernacular literary testimony. Yet, given its limitations, his brief catalog is a valuable witness. General characteristics[edit] Supra-regional cults[edit] Boudicca, the Celtic Queen that unleashed fury on the Romans. We British are used to women commanders in war; I am descended from mighty men!

Boudicca, the Celtic Queen that unleashed fury on the Romans

But I am not fighting for my kingdom and wealth now. I am fighting as an ordinary person for my lost freedom, my bruised body, and my outraged daughters.... Consider how many of you are fighting — and why! Then you will win this battle, or perish. That is what I, a woman, plan to do! These are the words of Queen Boudicca, according to ancient historian Tacitus, as she summoned her people to unleash war upon the invading Romans in Britain. Early years Little is known about Boudicca's upbringing because the only information about her comes from Roman sources, in particular from Tacitus (56 – 117 AD), a senator and historian of the Roman Empire, and Cassius Dio (155 – 235 AD), a Roman consul and noted historian. As an adolescent, Boudicca would have been sent away to another aristocratic family to be trained in the history and customs of the tribe, as well as learning how to fight in battle. The Irish Story and Legend of Cu Chulainn.

Cu Chulainn is one of the most famous Irish mythological heroes. He appears in the stories of the Ulster Cycle, and Scottish and Manx folklore. He was said to be the son of Deichtine and the god Lugh, and the nephew of Conchobar mac Nessa, the King of Ulster. His given name at birth was Setanta but he gained the name Cu Chulainn, meaning ‘Culann’s Hound’ after he killed a ferocious guard dog belonging to a smith named Culann. Cu Chulainn offered to take the place of the guard dog until a replacement could be reared. The Celtic Goddess Epona that Rode Swiftly Across the Ancient Roman Empire. Tierracast added: Michael Tsarion - The Irish Origins of Civilization.

The Druid and Phoenician Coarbs of Ireland. "These Corybantes are the Irish Curbs or Coarbs. It is not surprising that they came from Phoenicia. " - Sir Godfrey Higgins. The Scottish Rite of the Irish Children of the Nephilim. It was in the lands of Western Europe where the mighty Nephilim would continue their sagas of kings, conquest, religion and legends. The true origins of the Scottish Rite of the Irish Children of the Nephilim would begin early in the fourth and fifth centuries.

These epic stories of the Sons of God in Western Europe would carry on into the modern world; such as in Britain, France, Italy, Spain, Germany, Russia, America and many other countries where we can all witness their influence to this very day. This is their true apocalyptic story like it has never been told before. Part I. Irish Druids: Irish Bards. Sacred Texts Wicca & Neo-Paganism Index Previous Next The BARDS proper occupied a high position in Ireland. The Ollamhs had colleges at Clogher, Armagh, Lismore, and Tamar.

On this, Walker's Historical Memoirs, 1786, observes that "all the eminent schools, delectably situated, which were established by the Christian clergy in the fifth century, were erected on the ruins of those colleges. " They studied for twelve years to gain the barred cap and title of Ollamh or teacher. They were Ollamhain Re-dan, or Filidhe, poets. P. 38. Celtic mythology. Overview[edit] Tuatha Dé Danann. Much of Irish mythology was recorded by Christian monks, who modified it to an extent. They generally depicted the Tuath Dé as kings, queens and heroes of the distant past who had supernatural powers or who were later credited with them. However, some writers acknowledged that they were once worshipped as gods. Celtic Folklore.

Sacred-texts home Legends and Sagas EnglandBuy CD-ROM Buy Books about Celtic Folklore Ireland Wales Scotland Brittany Cornwall Manx Fairies General Links. European Stories and Fairy Tales - Fairytales of the World.