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Transom - A Showcase and Workshop for New Public Radio. Please classify me! Spotlight: exposing a sex-abuse scandal, one story at a time. Shortly after the Boston Globe began to break stories about sexual abuse by priests and the decades-long cover-up by the Catholic Church, in 2002, the newspaper’s editor, Marty Baron, received a letter. It was from a prominent Bostonian, complaining about the coverage by the newspaper and its Spotlight investigative team. He wrote that such a story would never have been pursued under previous editors of the Globe.

The editors all had Irish Catholic names. “I was very upset over that letter and sent a stern letter in response,” says Baron, who is now executive editor of the Washington Post. It was a clear warning that he was taking on something sacred in Boston. At the time of the exposé Baron was less than a year in the editor’s seat at the Globe. The veteran newspaperman, who is Jewish, interpreted the letter as “borderline anti-Semitic, if not over the line”. Baron’s decision to pursue the investigation and rattle Boston’s biggest cage was ultimately vindicated. May never be known. ‘Bertie’s Children’: what the 18-year-olds of Ireland think. Born into the boom but plunged into an economic bust during their teenage years, Ireland’s 18-year-olds will be able to vote in a general election for the first time in the coming weeks.

They do so against the backdrop of a recovering economy. They could be termed Bertie’s Children, born in 1997, the year the former taoiseach took office and the beginning of a 14-year period of Fianna Fáil-led governments. Until they were 10 they lived in a country of plenty. But after the devastating crash and the international bailout many families experienced financial stress and hardship. How did that affect them, if at all? What do they think of Ireland, and its political parties, now? The Irish Times has sought the opinions of eight young men and women born in 1997, from a variety of backgrounds and from across Ireland. “Glen Elder wanted to see if there were some benefits of recession,” says Layte. “The younger people would have changed, certainly in the last five years. And you are paying VAT. 6 Podcasts You Need To Listen To — Brainwash. HeyFranHey, Dustin Ross, and Assanté remind us every Wednesday that no one wants "a musty brain.

" With all the injustices happening around the world, it is important that we have conversations surrounding mental health and wellness on a daily basis. The trio welcome their listeners in with open hearts and open minds sharing their personal life experiences and giving us insight on how we can improve our minds, bodies, and souls. It is evident that this group of friends care about its listeners and care about their well beings as they tackle issues about finances and success to skincare and communication. They are some of the most genuine voices in the podcast world. Fave Episode: A$AP Shirley Caesar (Let's have a convo about financial freedom and Baby Phat Rush Cards) Tools Toolbar. Tools Toolbar allows you to choose various tools for selection, volume adjustment, zooming and time-shifting of audio.

Click on the toolbar image below to see this toolbar displayed in context of the default upper tooldock layout. There are two keyboard shortcuts that enable you to navigate through the various available tools: D This shortcut cycles forward selecting each tool in turn, returning to the Selection tool after the Multi tool A This shortcut cycles backward also selecting each tool in turn. Selection F1 Click to select a start point for audio playback, or click and drag to select a range of audio to play or edit. You can also create a selection region between two points by clicking at one point, then holding down SHIFT while left-clicking at the other point. Envelope F2 Allows smooth volume changes to be made over the length of a track by means of embedded volume "control points". Draw F3 Zoom F4 Left-click zooms in one step. Time Shift F5 See this page for more details. Audio Tracks and Clips. Edit Menu. The Edit Menu provides standard edit commands (Undo, Redo, Cut, Copy, Paste and Delete) plus many other commands specific to editing audio or labels.

There are many commands available from this menu so some commands are grouped into a cascading sub-menu (as denoted on this page by a table of commands). Mac OS X users: CTRL = COMMAND and ALT = OPTION. So, for example, CTRL + ALT + K = COMMAND + OPTION + K Undo CTRL + Z Undoes the last editing operation you performed to your project. Redo CTRL + Y Redoes any editing operations that were just undone. Cut CTRL + X Removes the selected audio data and/or labels and places these on the Audacity clipboard. Delete CTRL + K Similar to Cut, but removes the audio data and/or labels that are currently selected without copying them to the Audacity clipboard. Copy CTRL + C Copies the selected audio data to the Audacity clipboard without removing it from the project. Paste CTRL + V Duplicate CTRL + D Remove Special Commands for more "advanced" removal of audio: FAQ:Editing.

> Forward To: FAQ:Errors < Back to: FAQ:Opening and Saving Files |< Index of Frequently Asked Questions It's Not Working! Many menu items and other functions are disabled while playing, recording, or paused. To enable them, press the yellow Stop button . All effects, most Edit Menu items and Cut, Copy, Trim and Silence in Edit Toolbar require you to select the audio you want to change. To select a specific region of audio, click and drag with the Selection tool enabled so as to highlight the selected track. If you choose an effect or other menu item requiring a selection without making a selection, Audacity will by default select all the audio in the project. If preferred you can disable this behavior in the Tracks Preferences by unchecking Select all audio in project, if none selected. Back to top Why can't I select less than one second or click between whole seconds ?

Change "Snap To" in Selection Toolbar to "Off". Back to top back to top I'd Like To... How do I select audio in one track? Use . Navigation Tips. This page explains how to how to navigate the waveform or tracks (including moving the playback position) identifying audio for editing, and how to find and mark edit points. It's about "Navigating and Identifying audio for editing For tips on how to view and adjust playback volume, and to achieve smooth playback quality, see Playback Tips. Contents Changing playback position Audacity does not currently have a drag bar like most media players with which you can drag the audio position as it is playing. There is a however a << button to left of the green play button which skips to the start of the project, and a >> button to right of the stop button which skips to the end of the project. You can also skip to to the start of the track with the HOME key on your keyboard and to the end of it with the END key.

Audacity always plays from where the cursor position is, or where a selected area is, when you press SPACE or use the green Play button. Zooming Go to Selection Start/End Labels Clips. Audacity Wiki. Zoom H2n – Thomann Mobile. I use the Zoom for 2 purposes: - recording guitar and bass at home directly from my amp - recording our band Warning: I did not have any experience concerning recording music before, so this review might be helpful for you if you are a beginner too and are looking for equipment with easy and beginner friendly handling.

I am someone who does not like too Play around with technical devices and many Options, I just want the thing to work and to record my stuff in the most convenient way. Home recording works really good. Recording guitar seems to be easier than recording bass. Perfect for saving your song ideas for later. Band recordings sound very good as well, especially at lower volumes.

Handling: Deleting data directly from the H2n can be annoying, because you have to open some menues. Audio Recording With a Smartphone - Wild Mountain Echoes. It seems like smartphones will do anything. But do they make effective sound recorders? That depends on what you are looking (listening) for and what type of phone you have. Below I describe ways to record on your smartphone, with examples of products that might help. Most of this discussion is about Android phones and iPhones; tablets are for another day. There are 4 basic ways to use your phone as a recorder: The built-in microphone(s).Using a microphone plugged in through the headset port.Using a microphone plugged in through the charging port.Via Bluetooth. If you are looking to use your phone as a voice recorder, for recording personal notes, meetings, or impromptu sounds around you, then all you need is a recording app. Microphones on various models of phones vary quite a bit.

Most iPhones and smart phones these days come with a TRRS port for the headphones. Because of the differences in jacks, you cannot plug in any old microphone with a 3.5mm plug and expect it to work. How to record high quality audio with an external mic onto my Samsung Galaxy S Android handset. Recording Studio Microphones: The Ultimate Beginner Guide. Download this post to keep as your reference. Take a look at any online music superstore, and what do you see? Thousands upon thousands of microphones. And as any recording engineer will tell you… If you don’t know your stuff… Finding the good ones is NO easy task. As beginners…most of us make some pretty stupid mistakes.

To spare you the same headaches… I’ve assembled this handy little post, which I call: The Beginner’s Guide to Recording Studio Microphones. First up… The 2 “Umbrella” Categories One of the first things beginners learn… Is that the two “umbrella” categories of studio microphones are: Condenser MicsDynamic Mics 95% of all the mics you will ever use… Will fit into 1 of these 2 categories. The harder part is understanding the 8 KEY WAYS in which they compare. So let’s cover them now. 1. The Beginner’s Rule of Thumb states: Condenser mics work better on high frequency instruments…such as: acoustic guitarcymbalspiano And dynamic mics work better on low-mid frequency instruments…such as: 2. 3.

The beginner's guide to creating a podcast, according to the pros. Podcasts are so hot this season. With the outpour of podcast obsessions (thanks, Serial), we've probably all thought to ourselves, "How hard can it be? " It seems like everyone with a social media following has tried his hand at the storytelling medium. But not everyone succeeds. To get a behind-the-scenes look at creating a podcast, we reached out to the hosts of seven popular shows. They shared their starting points and favorite podcasting tips, via phone and email interviews, with Mashable. The shows we spoke to: Welcome to Night Vale: A twice-monthly series about the spooky, fictional town of Night Vale, created by Joseph Fink.The Read: A weekly sound-off that touches on pop culture gossip, social justice issues and whatever else hosts Kid Fury and Crissle feel like talking about.Here Be Monsters: Host Jeff Emtman explores frightful true stories about the unknown.Filmspotting: A weekly critical look at all things film by cofounder Adam Kempenaar and co-host Josh Larsen. 1.

Who Charted? Ukulele Royalty Free Music | Ukulele Stock Production Music. 7 Best Microphones for Recording Vocals: under $700. Download this post to keep as your reference. When it comes to microphones, it’s the first question on any beginner’s mind: What’s the best mic for recording vocals? Well the truth is… A list of the absolute “BEST” vocal mics would have NOTHING under $3000. And for a basic studio, that’s ridiculous. But the good news is… There are plenty great alternatives for much cheaper. And it todays post, I give you several examples in my top 7 list of Awesome Vocal Mics under $700.

The first mic up is… 1. For a long time now, the Shure SM58 has held the crown of “Most Popular Vocal Mic in the World“. Check out photos of your favorite singers on-stage, and 90% of the time, they’re holding an SM58. That because…it’s resistance to feedback, rugged casing, and ergonomic capsule makes it perfect for live performances. And it works just as well in the studio… You wouldn’t think that pro studios with unlimited budgets would ever use a $100 mic to record vocals. That’s what I’ve chosen for the next pick… 2. 3. 4. 5. ID3. ID3 is a metadata container most often used in conjunction with the MP3 audio file format.

It allows information such as the title, artist, album, track number, and other information about the file to be stored in the file itself. ID3 is also specified by Apple as a timed metadata in HTTP Live Streaming, carried as a PID in the main transport stream or in separate audio TS. There are two unrelated versions of ID3: ID3v1 and ID3v2. ID3v1 takes the form of a 128-byte segment at the end of an MP3 file containing a fixed set of data fields. ID3 is a de facto standard for metadata in MP3 files; no standardization body was involved in its creation nor has such an organization given it a formal approval status.[1] It competes with the APE tag in this arena. ID3v1[edit] The MP3 standard did not include a method for storing file metadata. One improvement to ID3v1 was made by Michael Mutschler in 1997. Layout[edit] Strings are either space- or zero-padded. Extended tag[edit] ID3v2[edit] ID3v2.2 ID3v2.3. 15 Tips for Recording at Home | Blue Microphones | Blue Blog.

Get better results when recording at home. We regularly get questions on how to achieve the best recordings at home. While many Blue users are recording in professional studios, even more are recording in their home office, bedroom, living room, basement or garage. There are a few easy ways to get studio acoustic results, at home. (See our home recording feature in the November issue of Stuff Magazine, on stands now!) We’ve put together a list of 15 basic ways to improve your recording setup and acoustics at home, including: setting up your acoustic environment, setting up your gear, achieve correct mic technique, and more! Take your at-home recordings to the next level– Recording environment: (#1 factor that impacts your recordings) 1. Bonus: Build your own DIY vocal booth for under $25: 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Headphones and Monitors: 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Microphones Technique 12.

Found out how to attach The Pop to your USB mic here 13. 14. 15. What’s the difference? How to Choose Your Microphone. The beginner's guide to creating a podcast, according to the pros. Podcasts are so hot this season. With the outpour of podcast obsessions (thanks, Serial), we've probably all thought to ourselves, "How hard can it be? " It seems like everyone with a social media following has tried his hand at the storytelling medium. But not everyone succeeds. To get a behind-the-scenes look at creating a podcast, we reached out to the hosts of seven popular shows. They shared their starting points and favorite podcasting tips, via phone and email interviews, with Mashable. The shows we spoke to: Welcome to Night Vale: A twice-monthly series about the spooky, fictional town of Night Vale, created by Joseph Fink.The Read: A weekly sound-off that touches on pop culture gossip, social justice issues and whatever else hosts Kid Fury and Crissle feel like talking about.Here Be Monsters: Host Jeff Emtman explores frightful true stories about the unknown.Filmspotting: A weekly critical look at all things film by cofounder Adam Kempenaar and co-host Josh Larsen. 1.

Who Charted? Audacity: About Audacity. Why aren't millennials buying houses? They can't afford it.