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Where the World Finds Bioethics

Where the World Finds Bioethics
Addressing the Ethical Challenges in Genetic Testing and Sequencing of Children Written by Ellen Wright Clayton, Laurence B. McCullough, Leslie G. Biesecker, Steven Joffe, Lainie Friedman Ross, Susan M. Wolf & For the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) Consortium Pediatrics Working Group American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) recently provided two recommendations about predictive genetic te...

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Bioethics 101 Bioethics 101 provides a systematic, five-lesson introductory course to support educators in incorporating bioethics into the classroom through the use of sequential, day-to-day lesson plans. This curriculum is designed to help science teachers in guiding their students to analyze issues using scientific facts, ethical principles, and reasoned judgment. These lessons represent a "best of" compilation from our popular Ethics Primer. Through the use of case studies, ethical principles, decision-making frameworks and stakeholder role-play, students are fully supported in learning how to justify an answer to an ethical question.

Spiders On Drugs Spiders On Drugs Scientists at the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have turned their attention from the mysteries of the cosmos to a more esoteric area of research: what happens when you get a spider stoned. Their experiments have shown that common house spiders spin their webs in different ways according to the psychotropic drug they have been given. Nasa scientists believe the research demonstrates that web-spinning spiders can be used to test drugs because the more toxic the chemical, the more deformed was the web. Earthquake prediction Earthquake prediction is a branch of the science of seismology concerned with the specification of the time, location, and magnitude of future earthquakes within stated confidence limits but with sufficient precision that a warning can be issued.[1][2] Of particular importance is the prediction of hazardous earthquakes likely to cause loss of life or damage to infrastructure. Earthquake prediction is sometimes distinguished from earthquake forecasting, which can be defined as the probabilistic assessment of general earthquake hazard, including the frequency and magnitude of damaging earthquakes in a given area over years or decades.[3] It can be further distinguished from earthquake warning systems, which upon detection of an earthquake, provide a real-time warning to regions that might be affected. Earthquake prediction and significance[edit]

Faith-Based Activism on Climate Change KIM LAWTON, correspondent: Deep in the bayous of south Louisiana, residents have little doubt about the impact of climate change. THERESA DARDAR: We live here, so we see it happening. We see the land sinking, sea level rise, we see it all. LAWTON: Theresa Dardar is part of a small Native American fishing community whose families have been here for generations. On a boat ride down the bayou, she shows me where her grandfather lived. Frankenstein fears after head transplant A controversial operation to transplant the whole head of a monkey onto a different body has proved a partial success. The scientist behind it wants to do the same thing to humans, but other members of the scientific community have condemned the experiments as "grotesque". Professor Robert White, from Cleveland Ohio, transplanted a whole monkey's head onto another monkey's body, and the animal survived for some time after the operation.

School of Mathematics and Physics Pictures above: (1) Longtime custodian of the famous experiment, the late Professor John Mainstone. (2) Three webcams trained on the experiment 24/7. (3) The Pitch Drop Experiment. (4) Close up of the pitch drop. About the Pitch Drop Experiment While the School of Mathematics and Physics at The University of Queensland has an international reputation for cutting-edge research and innovative teaching in the disciplines of Mathematics, Physics and Statistics, it is also home to the famous Pitch Drop Experiment. The experiment is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the world's longest-running laboratory experiment. The first Professor of Physics at UQ, Professor Thomas Parnell, began an experiment in 1927 to illustrate that everyday materials can exhibit quite surprising properties. The experiment demonstrates the fluidity and high viscosity of pitch, a derivative of tar once used for waterproofing boats.

Top Ten Takeaways from 'Laudato Si'' Pope Francis’ revolutionary new encyclical calls for a “broad cultural revolution” to confront the environmental crisis. “Laudato Si” is also quite lengthy. Can it be summarized? “Doomsday Seed Vault” in the Arctic This article was first published in December 2007. One thing Microsoft founder Bill Gates can’t be accused of is sloth. He was already programming at 14, founded Microsoft at age 20 while still a student at Harvard.

Improbable Research - Longest Running Experiments by Marc Abrahams We are happy to report that three of the world’s longest-running scientific experiments are indeed still running. It has been a number of years since anyone checked on all three. With assistance from scientists in several nations, we have managed to do so. Francis puts environment above short-term politics Sometime in April 1226, lying acutely ill in the grounds of St Clare’s San Damiano convent, St Francis of Assisi wrote the Cantico di fratre sole, the Canticle of Brother Sun. Nowadays we sing it as ‘All Creatures of Our God and King’. It is a cosmic hymn of praise to God in which the whole natural world joins. Pope Francis encyclical, Laudatio si (‘Praise Be’), quotes it at length (87).

GMO and the Corporate Patenting of Living Organisms: Monsanto’s Patents on Life By Katherine Paul, Ronnie Cummins In May 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court began hearing arguments in a seed patent infringement case that pits a small farmer from Indiana, 75-year old Vernon Hugh Bowman, against biotech goliath Monsanto. Reporters from the New York Times to the Sacramento Bee dissected the legal arguments. They speculated on the odds. They opined on the impact a Monsanto loss might have, not only on genetically modified crops, but on medical research and software.

Milgram's Obedience Experiments By Kendra Cherry Updated December 16, 2015. If a person in a position of authority ordered you to deliver a 400-volt electrical shock to another person, would you follow orders? Most people would answer this question with an adamant no, but Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram conducted a series of obedience experiments during the 1960s that led to some surprising results. These experiments offer a compelling and disturbing look at the power of authority and obedience.

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