background preloader

DMMapp - Digitized Medieval Manuscripts App

DMMapp - Digitized Medieval Manuscripts App
What is the DMMapp? The DMMapp is an open source app that links to digital repositories containing digitized western medieval manuscripts from all over the world. Finding digitized repositories can be difficult, and we want to create a central hub that can help medievalists, codicologists, and enthusiasts to find the medieval manuscripts they are searching for. Who made the DMMapp? The DMMapp is a project by Giulio Menna, MA, and Marjolein de Vos, MA. We are the Sexy Codicology Team. I love the DMMapp! Contribute to the DMMapp If you are aware of a library that is not on our DMMapp, you can use the "Add a Missing Library" form to let us know. I would like to base a project on the DMMapp! Absolutely! Where can I contact you? There is a nice and tidy contact form for that.

http://digitizedmedievalmanuscripts.org/app/

Related:  SourcesMapsdigitalizacja

Herodotus Timemap Book 1, Ch. 1 This is the display of the inquiry of Herodotus of Halicarnassus, so that things done by man not be forgotten in time, and that great and marvelous deeds, some displayed by the Hellenes, some by the barbarians, not lose their glory, including among others what was the cause of their waging war on each other.The Persian learned men say that the Phoenicians were the cause of the dispute. These (they say) came to our seas from the sea which is called Red, and having settled in the country which they still occupy, at once began to make long voyages. Among other places to which they carried Egyptian and Assyrian merchandise, they came to Argos,which was at that time preeminent in every way among the people of what is now called Hellas. Institute for Medieval Studies Select a link from the menu below to be taken to Web resources for that area. Please direct suggestions for other links to be listed here to Axel Müller. Chronological Periods Late Antiquity

About PELAGIOS stands for 'Pelagios: Enable Linked Ancient Geodata In Open Systems' - its aim is to help introduce Linked Open Data goodness into online resources that refer to places in the historic past. Why do we want to do that? Well, we think it will make all sorts of other things possible, including new modes of discovery and visualization for scholars and the general public. Pelagios also means 'of the sea', the superhighway of the pre-industrial world - a metaphor we consider appropriate for a digital resource that will connect references to ancient places. A short (10 slide) presentation providing a compact overview of PELAGIOS 1 & 2 is available online here.

Thematic Cartography Guide Welcome! In this short guide we share some insights and tips for making thematic maps. Our goal is to cover the important concepts in cartography and flag the important decision points in the map-making process. As with many activities in life, there isn’t always a single best answer in cartography, and in those cases we’ve tried to outline some of the pros and cons to different solutions. This is by no means a replacement for a full textbook on cartography; rather it is a quick reference guide for those moments when you’re stumped, unsure of what to do next, or unfamiliar with the terminology. While the recommendations on these pages are short and not loaded with academic references, please appreciate that they represent a thoughtful synthesis of decades of map-making research.

How to Avoid Being Fooled by Bad Maps Maps are big these days. Blogs and news sites (including this one) frequently post maps and those maps often go viral—40 maps that explain the world, the favorite TV shows of each U.S. state, and so on. They’re all over Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr, and news organizations are understandably capitalizing on the power that maps clearly have in digital space: they can visualize a lot of data quickly and effectively. But they can also visualize a lot of data inaccurately and misleadingly. Maps Catalog The Smithsonian Institution, since the earliest days, has sent its researchers on expeditions to fulfill the mission of increasing and diffusing knowledge. These researchers usually relied on maps to plan and guide their quests. Efforts have been made recently to organize the maps that have accumulated over the years in the National Museum of Natural History. This website is a result of those efforts. The catalog currently includes 26575 distinct maps covering 17576 subjects, with 25278 images available for viewing. You can search for details about any of the maps using four different methods.

Geological Investigation of the Alluvial Valley of the Lower Mississippi River, Part IV Fisk and his endlessly fascinating geological investigations will surely return in varying permutations, recognizably or otherwise, throughout the new year. So please visit often and stay awhile. Lower Mississippi Valley: Engineering Geology Mapping ProgramPlates 22-1 to 22-15 @ Flickr Part IIIPart IIPart I

Home / Contents Page Welcome to 'Medieval Primary Sources—Genre, Rhetoric and Transmission'! This website provides a guide to the organisation and contents of the course. It is here that you will find detailed guidance as to the topics of the seminars and links to online facsimiles/images of the manuscripts which we will be discussing in class. Please familiarise yourself with the contents of the site. For general matters concerning postgraduate studies you should refer to the History Department's Handbook for the MA in History.

Import info to your map - My Maps Help You can pull lots of geographical info into a map all at once. Here's how: Step 1: Prepare your data You can import a CSV, TSV, KML, KMZ, GPX, or XLSX file, or a sheet from Google Drive. Note: You can import only one data file per layer, and each file can have up to 2,000 rows. Step 2: Import content

Related: