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Fuel Creativity in the Classroom With Divergent Thinking

Fuel Creativity in the Classroom With Divergent Thinking
Recently, I showed a group of students in my high school art class a film called Ma Vie En Rose (My Life in Pink), about a seven-year-old boy named Ludovic who identifies as female. Ludovic has an active imagination, but is bullied by both adults and other kids who are unnerved by his desire to wear dresses and play with dolls. The film challenged my students to broaden their understanding of gender and identity and led to a discussion about ways in which our imaginations are limited when we are forced to be who we are not. It also reminded me of other examples in which character is forced to choose an identity, such as the movie Divergent, based on the popular trilogy of novels by Veronica Roth. In Divergent, a dystopian future society has been divided into five factions based on perceived virtues. Young people are forced to choose a faction as a rite of passage to becoming an adult. Defining Divergent Thinking In the Classroom: Strategies Strategy #2: Let the Music Play

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/fueling-creativity-through-divergent-thinking-classroom-stacey-goodman

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A different side of EFL: Passive users or critical thinkers? Developing critical and creative thinking skills with technology Passive users or critical thinkers? Developing critical and creative thinking skills with technology Had enough with your students using their tablets or mobile devices to play games for non-thinking users? Project based learning with the aid of technology can be used creatively to stimulate students interest and develop their critical and creative thinking skills. This post is about activities and tools that can help students use their creative and critical abilities while learning. A brief intro

18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently This list has been expanded into the new book, “Wired to Create: Unravelling the Mysteries of the Creative Mind,” by Carolyn Gregoire and Scott Barry Kaufman. Creativity works in mysterious and often paradoxical ways. Creative thinking is a stable, defining characteristic in some personalities, but it may also change based on situation and context. Inspiration and ideas often arise seemingly out of nowhere and then fail to show up when we most need them, and creative thinking requires complex cognition yet is completely distinct from the thinking process. Neuroscience paints a complicated picture of creativity. As scientists now understand it, creativity is far more complex than the right-left brain distinction would have us think (the theory being that left brain = rational and analytical, right brain = creative and emotional).

Mix It Up! Authentic Activities for the World Language Classroom Do you ever feel stuck in a rut while planning your language classes? Perhaps you spend a lot of time lecturing at the white board, use the same activities with different vocabulary for every unit, or rely on teaching students grammar because that's how you were taught. No matter your "go to" activity, we are all much more engaging when we vary our activities and make them relatable.

Practical Pedagogies 2015: Ewan McIntosh Ewan's Background Ewan McIntosh is an award-winning educator and the founder of NoTosh Limited, based in Scotland, Australia and San Francisco, with a global reputation for researching and delivering new learning opportunities for some of the world’s top creative companies and school districts. The team has a unique ongoing experience in creativity in creative contexts (we work with some of the world’s top fashion, media and tech companies) and research-based learning and teaching development with schools. The perils of “Growth Mindset” education: Why we’re trying to fix our kids when we should be fixing the system One of the most popular ideas in education these days can be summarized in a single sentence (a fact that may help to account for its popularity). Here’s the sentence: Kids tend to fare better when they regard intelligence and other abilities not as fixed traits that they either have or lack, but as attributes that can be improved through effort. In a series of monographs over many years and in a book published in 2000, psychologist Carol Dweck used the label “incremental theory” to describe the self-fulfilling belief that one can become smarter. Rebranding it more catchily as the “growth mindset” allowed her to recycle the idea a few years later in a best-selling book for general readers.

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