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David Steindl-Rast: Want to be happy? Be grateful

David Steindl-Rast: Want to be happy? Be grateful
Related:  TEDx - 2Motivation

Just How Small Is an Atom? - Jonathan Bergmann Whether we’re zooming in to the wavelength of a gamma ray or zooming out to the size of a galaxy, it can be difficult to wrap our heads around the big numbers we’re measuring—like nanometers (10-9meters) or gigameters (109). Take a look at these efforts to represent big numbers. What are the strengths of each? How would you represent a large number (like a gigameter)? How Facebook’s newest teen engineer supported his family with apps until cashing in There’s nothing that highlights the fact that Silicon Valley is the new Wall Street, gold rush, colonial settlement — insert your American Dream rags-to-riches historical moniker here — quite like the story of 18-year-old Miami resident Michael Sayman. This week, Facebook hired Sayman as one of its youngest full-time engineers in history. He wouldn’t tell me his salary, but admitted his friends are already pressuring him to “buy a Tesla,” which he won’t do because he’d “rather save the money.” Before you go throw up at the idea of a teenager buying himself a Tesla off tech riches, there’s few people who deserve that luxury quite as much as this kid. I met Sayman four months ago, when the then 17-year-old developer caught Mark Zuckerberg’s eye. He had poured the last year of his life into building the game, which was a version of charades. “I’m beating Starbucks, Luminosity, Fitbit, Lyft… oh my gosh, it’s number 123 in the overall app store ratings!”

Repair businesses provide antidote to throwaway culture The hall of a primary school in Brooklyn is unusually busy for a Saturday morning. This is a "pop-up repair" event, and it is drawing in the crowds. Parents and children from around the neighbourhood have brought in their broken things to be fixed by menders, each with their own area of expertise. At different tables, repairers fix jewellery, electronics and furniture among many other things. This is also an opportunity to teach kids repair skills, and a group of boys is hammering away in the corner. In the midst of this hive of noisy tinkering stands Sandra Goldmark. "People hold on to their broken things for a long time," she says. Ms Goldmark, who is a set designer and theatre professor, created Pop Up Repair three years ago with her husband, who is also in theatre production. Initially launched with a crowdfunding campaign and a team of handy backstage theatre professionals, Pop Up Repair fixes a range of items - toys, glasses, furniture and clothing. 'Internal resistance' 'Education'

Marcher en Pleine Conscience dans la nature (Mindfulness) Marcher est très bon pour l'etre humain. Nos ancetres lointains marchaient souvent 20 km par jour, et dans la nature bien sûr. Donc notre corps et notre cerveau se sont formés au fil des millénaires à partir de cette activité principale. Des études ont montré que le simple fait de marcher 20 minutes modifie à tout age l'activité du cerveau et amène de l'équilibre dans les neurotransmetteurs, dont la fameuse dopamine, comme le montre le schema ci-dessous : Nos nouvelles habitudes de vie trés sédentaitres et cérébrales necessitent encore plus que nous revenions souvent à ce mouvement de base qu'est la marche. Les plus sportifs pourront adopter une marche rapide en ville ou une marche en montagne, mais il existe aussi la notion de marche méditative de type pleine conscience (mindfulness) à la portée de tous, tout aussi efficace, et qui demande simplement un effort d'attention, surtout dans sa phase d'apprentissage. Voici une proposition pour l'apprentissage de la marche méditative :

12 Must-See TED Talks for Purposeful Women - Let Why Lead When my husband first started cueing TED talks for us, I’d try to convince him to go for Modern Family instead. But it wasn’t long before I caught on. A TED talk means you are twenty minutes away from feeling like you can do amazing things. I’ve spent a lot of time narrowing it down, and these are my twelve favorite TED talks for purposeful women. Happy viewing! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Have any of these impacted you? Update: Visit my followup post for 5 honorable mentions. PS. Linked up with What I Learned Wednesday, Works for Me Wednesday, and Grace at Home. 5 Reasons To Write A Letter To Your Future Self | This Is QuarterLife In March, I turned twenty-five years old, and on that most dreaded day I received a letter from my twelve year-old-self. At twelve, I distinctly remember listening to Britney Spears’ “Ooops I did it Again,” consuming Fruit by the Foot, surviving Y2K, and wearing checkered school jumpers that came down to my knees. It was that magical time right before pimples started growing uncontrollably and watching Saturday morning cartoons was still acceptable. Oh how much has changed since those simple times. Reading my letter evoked a lot of emotions in the span of two minutes. It was hilarious that I questioned my own ability to achieve higher education, or better yet, to even have higher education as my main concern at the age of twelve. Aside from the obvious hilarity that comes out of a twelve year-olds mind, it amazed me how much my twelve year old self seemed to know about life. 1) It reminds you of who you once were 2) Writing a letter helps you reflect

Video: Can we end pandemics in our lifetime? By tracking social media, it turns out, we can get much better at recognizing pandemics early. Solving epidemics has been the goal of physician Larry Brilliant’s career — and the basis for his 2006 TED Prize wish, which he updated this year in a talk at TED2013, above. His wish called for an “International System for Total Early Disease Detection,” or InSTEDD, a project with the mantra “Early detection, early response” — which included, among other features, tracking stories on the web to watch for patterns that indicate an epidemic is about to break out. After winning the TED Prize, Brilliant founded InSTEDD, a nongovernmental, multilingual, worldwide digital surveillance system that monitors the web, global news and social media for phrases and patterns that may signal a brand-new pandemic. In this update, Brilliant shares new data that shows … it’s working.

Your Words Matter Your Words Matter. I had a teacher who once told me I would most likely be a college dropout. Her words mattered. When I told my wife I wanted to write a book and she said without blinking an eye, “Do it.” I told my daughter the other day how proud I was of her for writing a full sentence! My words mattered. And when I hear back from the teachers and parents that read this blog, I know my words matter. “Learning how to use language effectively will be the most valuable skill you will have to use for the rest of your life.” Woah. Want to get a job? Want to get married? Want to sell something? What Are We Teaching Our Children About Their Words? The problem I see across the board in schools and in the workplace, is that most people rarely think about the power their words have to make a positive impact. DON’T use your words to bully another person (important). or DON’T use contractions (not that important). Your Words Matter To matter means to be of consequence or importance to others.

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