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Concepts, Methods, and Tutorials for Students and Instructors

Concepts, Methods, and Tutorials for Students and Instructors

http://dh101.humanities.ucla.edu/

Related:  Digital ToolsHumanités numériques

Palladio Palladio is a toolset for easy upload and careful investigation of data. It is an intertwined set of visualizations designed for complex, multi-dimensional data. It is a product of the "Networks in History" project that has its roots in another humanities research project based at Stanford: Mapping the Republic of Letters (MRofL). MRofL produced a number of unique visualizations tied to individual case studies and specific research questions. You can see the tools on this site and read about the case studies at republicofletters.stanford.edu. With "Networks in History" we are taking the insights gained and lessons learned from MRofL and applying them to a set of visualizations that reflect humanistic thinking about data.

» Getting Started in Digital Humanities Journal of Digital Humanities Lisa Spiro When I presented at the Great Lakes College Association’s New Directions workshop on digital humanities (DH) in October, I tried to answer the question “Why digital humanities?” But I discovered that an equally important question is “How do you do digital humanities?” Although participants seemed to be excited about the potential of digital humanities, some weren’t sure how to get started and where to go for support and training. Building on the slides I presented at the workshop, I’d like to offer some ideas for how a newcomer might get acquainted with the community and dive into digital humanities work. What is the Spatial Turn? · Spatial Humanities “Landscape turns” and “spatial turns” are referred to throughout the academic disciplines, often with reference to GIS and the neogeography revolution that puts mapping within the grasp of every high-school student. By “turning” we propose a backwards glance at the reasons why travelers from so many disciplines came to be here, fixated upon landscape, together. For the broader questions of landscape – worldview, palimpsest, the commons and community, panopticism and territoriality — are older than GIS, their stories rooted in the foundations of the modern disciplines. These terms have their origin in a historic conversation about land use and agency.

How did they make that? (Cross-posted on UCLA’s DH Bootcamp blog) Edit: Dot Porter made a Zotero collection for this post! Thanks, Dot! Many students tell me that in order to get started with digital humanities, they’d like to have some idea of what they might do and what technical skills they might need in order to do it. Here’s a set of digital humanities projects that might help you to get a handle on the kinds of tools and technologies available for you to use.

Exploring Big Historical Data: The Historian's Macroscope Welcome to the companion site for Exploring Big Historical Data: The Historian’s Macroscope, published by Imperial College Press. If you want to buy a copy, you can purchase one for $39.00 USD. Feel free to visit our original live-written fully open draft website, which is still online – and if you like what you see, you can always buy the book! Mapping redheads: which country has the most? A couple of months ago this map did the rounds. It's quite nice right? It shows that in most of Scotland and Ireland, as well as a random patch in central Russia, 10% of people are of the ginger genre.

100 Diagrams That Changed the World Since the dawn of recorded history, we’ve been using visual depictions to map the Earth, order the heavens, make sense of time, dissect the human body, organize the natural world, perform music, and even concretize abstract concepts like consciousness and love. 100 Diagrams That Changed the World (public library) by investigative journalist and documentarian Scott Christianson chronicles the history of our evolving understanding of the world through humanity’s most groundbreaking sketches, illustrations, and drawings, ranging from cave paintings to The Rosetta Stone to Moses Harris’s color wheel to Tim Berners-Lee’s flowchart for a “mesh” information management system, the original blueprint for the world wide web. It appears that no great diagram is solely authored by its creator. Most of those described here were the culmination of centuries of accumulated knowledge.

Short Guide to the Digital_Humanities The Short Guide, a subsection of Digital_Humanities that my coauthors (Anne Burdick, Johanna Drucker, Peter Lunenfeld and Todd Presner) and I devised both for DH practitioners and for department chairs, deans, promotion committees, provosts and university presidents, is now being released, section by section and with a video preface, by the online edition of the Bard Graduate Center’s journal of decorative arts, design history and material culture W 86th. Though it refers back to the arguments of earlier chapters of our MIT Press book, the Short Guide also stands alone as an overview of the field. As digital methodologies, tools, and skills become central to work in the humanities, questions regarding fundamentals, project outcomes, assessment, and design have grown in importance. So the Short Guide sets out to provide a set of checklists and guidelines in concise and shareable form.

Historical Network Research 1) Start with some introductory texts on Social Network Analysis Among the general HNR articles in the Bibliography, Scott Weingart’s blog post series “Networks Demystified” and Claire Lemercier’s article “Formal network methods in history” are particularly useful to get you ideas. To get a first idea of Social Network Analysis terminology and concepts, you may find this Cheat Sheet helpful. A great resource which will help you understand what you can expect from Social Network Analysis is Valdis Krebs’ Network Discovery Matrix. 2) Find answers to these questions: 1.

Creating the true citizen scientist Citizen science is a powerful concept. Surely there’s no better way to engage the public in science than to include them in actual research. And already there are hundreds of projects all over the world, including conservation projects that depend on enthusiasts to count local wildlife populations, and internet-based projects, such as Galaxy Zoo, which make use of the human mind’s advantage over computers for recognising patterns in space images.

Spatial Humanities This five-year project runs from 2012-16 and is funded by the European Research Council under a Starting Researcher Grant. Our aim is to create a step-change in how place, space and geography are explored in the Humanities. Building on Lancaster University’s technical expertise in Digital Humanities, Corpus Linguistics and Geospatial Analysis, as well as its applied expertise in the history of the English Lake District, we are developing and applying methodologies for analysing unstructured texts—including large corpora of historical books, periodicals and official reports—within a Geographic Information Systems (or GIS) environment. Recent Posts Please check back soon!

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