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Mondragon Corporation

Mondragon Corporation
Mondragon cooperatives operate in accordance with Statement on the Co-operative Identity maintained by the International Co-operative Alliance. History[edit] The determining factor in the creation of the Mondragon system was the arrival in 1941 of a young Catholic priest José María Arizmendiarrieta in Mondragón, a town with a population of 7,000 that had not yet recovered from the Spanish Civil War: poverty, hunger, exile and tension.[2] In 1943, Arizmendiarrieta established a technical college that became a training ground for generations of managers, engineers and skilled labour for local companies, and primarily for the co-operatives.[3] Before creating the first co-operative, Arizmendiarrieta spent a number of years educating young people about a form of humanism based on solidarity and participation, in harmony with Catholic Social Teaching, and the importance of acquiring the necessary technical knowledge. The first 15 years were characterised by enormous dynamism. Finance[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mondragon_Corporation

Related:  Worker Owned CompaniesFábricas OcupadasGlobal-scale funding/finance

Workers' self-management Self-management or workers' self-management (also referred to as labor management, autogestión, workers' control, industrial democracy and producer cooperatives) is a form of management that involves management of an organization by its workers. Self-management is a characteristic of many models of socialism, with proposals for self-management having appeared many times throughout the history of the socialist movement, advocated variously by market socialists, communists and anarchists.[1] There are many variations of self-management. In some variations, all the worker-members manage the enterprise directly through assemblies; in other forms, workers manage indirectly through the appointment of managers through election. Economic theory[edit]

Kazova workers claim historic victory in Turkey After two years of resistance, the Free Kazova worker cooperative in Turkey now started producing, setting an example for a new generation of workers. Photo via Özgür Kazova. “No, I didn’t receive any compensation, but I did get a factory,” was Aynur Aydemir’s response to one of her former colleagues from the Kazova textile factory, when she was asked if she had ever received any of the money their former bosses still owed them. “Whether it’s going to be successful or not, whether it’s old or new, I have a factory. We might lack the necessary capital to run this business, and we might fail in the future, but at least we got something.” Aynur is a member of the small Free Kazova cooperative, which after two years of struggle finally managed to declare victory in February this year, when it was able to claim legal ownership over a handful of old, worn-out weaving machines which previously belonged to their former bosses.

Distributism - Wikipedia "Distributivism" redirects here. For the algebraic concept, see distributivity. Distributism (also known as distributionism[1] or distributivism)[2] is an economic ideology that developed in Europe in the late 19th and early 20th century based upon the principles of Catholic social teaching, especially the teachings of Pope Leo XIII in his encyclical Rerum novarum and Pope Pius XI in Quadragesimo anno.[3]

9/11 and the Imperial Mentality We are approaching the 10th anniversary of the horrendous atrocities of September 11, 2001, which, it is commonly held, changed the world. On May 1st, the presumed mastermind of the crime, Osama bin Laden, was assassinated in Pakistan by a team of elite US commandos, Navy SEALs, after he was captured, unarmed and undefended, in Operation Geronimo. A number of analysts have observed that although bin Laden was finally killed, he won some major successes in his war against the U.S. "He repeatedly asserted that the only way to drive the U.S. from the Muslim world and defeat its satraps was by drawing Americans into a series of small but expensive wars that would ultimately bankrupt them," Eric Margolis writes.

Cooperative In short, a coop can be defined as "a jointly owned enterprise engaging in the production or distribution of goods or the supplying of services, operated by its members for their mutual benefit, typically organized by consumers or farmers."[4] Cooperative businesses are typically more economically resilient than many other forms of enterprise, with twice the number of co-operatives (80%) surviving their first five years compared with other business ownership models (41%).[5] Cooperatives frequently have social goals which they aim to accomplish by investing a proportion of trading profits back into their communities. As an example of this, in 2013, retail co-operatives in the UK invested 6.9% of their pre-tax profits in the communities in which they trade as compared with 2.4% for other rival supermarkets.[6]

Escrow - Wikipedia This article is about an escrow of money. For escrows of computer source code, see source code escrow. An escrow is: The word derives from the Old French word escroue, meaning a scrap of paper or a scroll of parchment; this indicated the deed that a third party held until a transaction was completed.[2] Concerning the Violent Peace-Police: An Open Letter to Chris Hedges Concerning the Violent Peace-Police: An Open Letter to Chris Hedges By Suzanne | February 9, 2012 Another one of our authors, David Graeber, has written a response to Chris Hedges’ controversial article “The Cancer in Occupy.” This piece was published this morning over at n+1 and is excerpted here; please head over to n+1 to read it in its entirety. Thanks to David for this thoughtful contribution to the important conversation around the tactics and dynamics of the Occupy movement.

Evergreen Cooperatives The Evergreen Cooperatives are a connected group of worker-owned cooperatives in Cleveland, Ohio. They are committed to local, worker-owned job creation; sustainable, green and democratic workplaces; and community economic development. Overview[edit] Background[edit] Much of the idea of worker control came in 1977 Youngstown, Ohio when the Youngstown Sheet and Tube company abruptly closed and laid off 5,000 workers.[1] In an effort to stop the layoffs, the workers and city attempted to buy a steel mill and control it themselves.

FaSinPat FaSinPat, formerly known as Zanon, is a worker-controlled ceramic tile factory in the southern Argentine province of Neuquén, and one of the most prominent in the recovered factory movement of Argentina. The name is short for Fábrica Sin Patrones, which means "Factory Without Bosses" in Spanish. Opening of the factory[edit] The factory was opened in the early 1980s by Luigi Zanon, when Argentina was ruled by a dictatorship. According to Alejandro López, a representative of the workers' union, Zanon's factory was built on public land using public funding from the national and provincial governments, which were never repaid.[1] In the inaugural parade, Luigi Zanon congratulated the military government for "keeping Argentina safe for investments", in a reference to the Dirty War (the illegal repression of political dissidents).

Threshold pledge system - Wikipedia When the threshold is reached, the pledges are called in (or transferred from the escrow fund) and a contract is formed so that the collective good is supplied; a variant is that the money is collected when the good is actually delivered. If the threshold is not reached by a certain date (or perhaps if no contract is ever signed, etc.), the pledges are either never collected or, if held in escrow, are simply returned to the pledgers. In economics, this type of model is known as an assurance contract. This system is most often applied to creative works, both for financing new productions and for buying out existing works; in the latter cases, it is sometimes known as ransom publishing model[1] or Street Performer Protocol (SPP).[2]

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