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WEBSITES\HOBOPAGE\hobosigns

WEBSITES\HOBOPAGE\hobosigns
Hobo Signs These Hobo Signs below, plus a large glossary of Hobo Terms are available in printed form in my book "The American Hoboes" "Riders of the Rails". For information about this book, and how to acquire a copy, email me by clicking on the button below. email Fran For more fabulous, informative Hobo information use these links.There are none better on the entire internet. There may be one or more signs that give the same message or, at times, there may be slightly different meanings for a sign. More Hobo/Tramp Signs With so much Hobo and tramp history unrecorded all we can do is draw the best conclusions from what we are able to put together from bits and pieces of old documents that can still be found so, from my own experience, and studies, I believe these are tramp signs. Key to Hobo / Tramp Signs Below Related:  Language, Words, & MeaningCommunication Systems & Means

Ten Most Difficult Words to Translate Sometimes even the finest translators come up against words that defy translation. Many languages include words that don’t have a simple counterpart in another language. When translators come across such a word, they usually describe it so that it makes sense in the target language. But some words pose more difficulty than others due to interesting cultural differences. Here are ten words that are particularly difficult to translate: Mamihlapinatapei From Yagan, the indigenous language of the Tierra del Fuego region of South America. Jayus From Indonesian, meaning a joke so poorly told and so unfunny that one cannot help but laugh. Prozvonit In both Czech and Slovak language, this word means to call a mobile phone only to have it ring once so that the other person would call back, allowing the caller not to spend money on minutes. Kyoikumama In Japanese, this word refers to a mother who relentlessly pushes her children toward academic achievement.

Deodorant Recipe Thank you for visiting Little House in the Suburbs. Please subscribe and you'll get great simple living tips and how-to articles delivered to your inbox, for free! In the DIY world of home health and beauty products, deodorant seems to be the the most feared replacement. But aluminum crammed in your pores cannot be good for you, and it seems in recent years that store-bought deodorant is becoming less and less effective anyway. So, here’s what I suggest….make this stuff ahead and use it on SATURDAY, or a sick day, or any day you aren’t going to see anyone special, so you’ll feel secure and not look like a nut obsessively sniffing your underarms all day. Homemade Stick Deodorant 1. 2. 3. 4. When applying this deodorant, use a lighter hand than you would with normal stick deodorant, especially the first couple of days or it’ll drop little balls on your bathroom rug. Used correctly, this stuff is invisible and lasts for ages, as it works with a very light layer.

10 Insulting Words You Should Know There is a crisis of insults on the Web. On one hand, the volume of flames is very high yet the quality is poor. Gone are the days of the razor-sharp wit of Oscar Wilde and Winston Churchill*, only to be replaced by a string of four letter words typed in ALL CAPS by n00bs (the latest of which is “FAIL”, itself a failure of coming up with a more scathing insult, if you think about it). *For example:"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go," says Oscar Wilde.George Bernard Shaw wrote to Winston Churchill, "I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a friend....if you have one." Well, it’s hard to teach wit - but all of us can learn the next best thing: the approximation of it by obfuscation, i.e. using big, difficult, and obscure words. 1. Definition: 1) To make French in quality or trait 2) To make somewhat effeminate, and 3) To contract a veneral disease (a 19th century slang). Analysis: We have the English to thank for this word. 2. 3.

Orwell was wrong: doublethink is as clear as languag... Everyone remembers Newspeak, the straitjacketed version of English from George Orwell’s novel 1984 (1949). In that dystopia, Newspeak was a language designed by ideological technicians to make politically incorrect thoughts literally inexpressible. Fewer people know that Orwell also worried about the poverty of our ordinary, unregimented vocabulary. Too often, he believed, we lack the words to say exactly what we mean, and so we say something else, something in the general neighbourhood, usually a lot less nuanced than what we had in mind; for example, he observed that ‘all likes and dislikes, all aesthetic feeling, all notions of right and wrong… spring from feelings which are generally admitted to be subtler than words’. His solution was ‘to invent new words as deliberately as we would invent new parts for a motor-car engine’. This, he suggested in an essay titled ‘New Words’ (1940), might be the occupation of ‘several thousands of… people.’ Get Aeon straight to your inbox Video

Hobo Two hobos walking along railroad tracks after being put off a train. One is carrying a bindle. Etymology[edit] Tramps and hobos are commonly lumped together, but see themselves as sharply differentiated. A hobo or bo is simply a migratory laborer; he may take some longish holidays, but soon or late he returns to work. A tramp never works if it can be avoided; he simply travels. History[edit] Cutaway illustration of a hobo stove, an improvised portable heat-producing and cooking device, utilizing air convection It is unclear exactly when hobos first appeared on the American railroading scene. In 1906, Professor Layal Shafee, after an exhaustive study, put the number of tramps in the United States at about 500,000 (about 0.6% of the U.S. population). The number of hobos increased greatly during the Great Depression era of the 1930s.[6] With no work and no prospects at home, many decided to travel for free by freight train and try their luck elsewhere. Life as a hobo was dangerous. Books[edit]

Online Etymology Dictionary A Practical Guide to Antibiotics and Their Usage for Survival Preparing for Biological and Chemical Terrorism: A Practical Guide to Antibiotics and Their Usage for Survival by Leonard G. Horowitz, D.M.D., M.A., M.P.H. Tetrahedron, LLC Sandpoint, Idaho Disclaimer and Background This information is for educational purposes only. The author, publisher, and distributors of this work accept no responsibility for people using or misusing the potentially life-saving information in this text. Individuals suffering from any disease, illness, or injury should, as Hippocrates prescribed, "learn to derive benefit from the illness." The antibiotic applications against germ warfare discussed herein are not well-established medical practices. Furthermore, though certain antibiotics are customarily prescribed to kill certain strains of bacteria, germ warfare presents unique challenges. Near the beginning of a widespread biological attack, it may be extremely difficult to determine precisely the causative agent, and thereby select the proper antibiotic. Ampicillin

Understand Canadian Slang Edit Article Slang Cheat SheetsUnderstanding Canadian Slang Edited by Ted, Ben Rubenstein, Melodie R, KnowItSome and 78 others In Canada we have enough to do keeping up with two spoken languages without trying to invent slang, so we just go right ahead and use English for literature, Scotch for sermons and American for conversation. -- Stephen Leacock Although Canadians are influenced far more by Americans than they want to admit, Canadians have their own words that have no literal translation in any other language. Note that not all Canadians use all of these terms. Ad Steps Understanding Canadian Slang Creating The World's Greatest Anagram "It's supposed to look unlabored." ~ poet Christian Bök on anagrams If the poem above brings you some holiday cheer, know this: Those 56 lines are an anagram of 'Twas The Night Before Christmas. Yes, if you take Clement Parke Moore's famed yuletide poem, pretend the title is "The Night Before Christmas" (it's actually called "A Visit From St. Anagrams have a certain mysticism. There's a reason people believed "Elvis Lives". But those are the short ones. Canadian avant-garde poet Christian Bök has published some of the Internet's favorite anagrams. "It should look inevitable," he says. Creation reaction Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid In February of 2007, in the front window of a nondescript New York bookstore, the text pictured above appeared. "It is nothing short of perfect," Lexier says. There could be other permutations of Lexier's initial text, but Bök added his own "subsidiary constraints", a practice for which he's become popular in the avant-garde poetry world. Lego ogle Stasis assist

Hoboglyphs: Secret Transient Symbols & Modern Nomad Codes Linguistic Geography of the United States Traditionally, dialectologists have listed three dialect groups in the United States: Northern, Midland, and Southern--although some scholars prefer a two-way classification of simply Northern and Southern, and one may also find significant difference on the boundaries of each area. The map shown above represents a synthesis of various independent field studies this century. These are in chronological order: the Linguistic Atlas fieldwork begun under the direction of Hans Kurath in the 1930's; the informal but extensive personal observations of Charles Thomas in the 1940's; the DARE fieldwork of the 1960's under Frederic Cassidy; and the Phonological Atlas fieldwork of William Labov during the 1990's. Although it may seem that a great amount of data has been collected over a short time span, the shifts in American dialects this century have been rapid enough to outpace the data collection. The New England Dialects The New York Dialects The Great Lakes Dialects The Upper Midwest Dialects

s Homemade Soap Recipe by Robert Wayne Atkins Grandpappy's Homemade Soap Recipe Copyright © 2007,2008 by Robert Wayne Atkins, P.E. All rights reserved and all rights protected under international copyright law. Click Here for a Microsoft WORD printer friendly copy of this article. Introduction During hard times sooner or later everyone runs out of soap. To make soap you only need three things: rainwater,cold ashes from any hardwood fire, andanimal fat from almost any type of animal, such as a cow, pig, goat, sheep, bear, beaver, raccoon, opossum, groundhog, etc. Soap is not difficult to make and it does not require any special equipment. Soap is a "perfect consumer product" for the following five reasons: Soap is a legal product.Everyone everywhere uses soap.Soap is completely used up in a short period of time.When people run out of soap they want to buy more.Soap is relatively low in price so almost everyone can afford it. There are three major differences between homemade soap and commercial quality soap: Basic Soap Making Equipment

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