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WEBSITES\HOBOPAGE\hobosigns

WEBSITES\HOBOPAGE\hobosigns
Hobo Signs These Hobo Signs below, plus a large glossary of Hobo Terms are available in printed form in my book "The American Hoboes" "Riders of the Rails". For information about this book, and how to acquire a copy, email me by clicking on the button below. email Fran For more fabulous, informative Hobo information use these links.There are none better on the entire internet. There may be one or more signs that give the same message or, at times, there may be slightly different meanings for a sign. More Hobo/Tramp Signs With so much Hobo and tramp history unrecorded all we can do is draw the best conclusions from what we are able to put together from bits and pieces of old documents that can still be found so, from my own experience, and studies, I believe these are tramp signs. Key to Hobo / Tramp Signs Below

http://www.worldpath.net/~minstrel/hobosign.htm

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Orwell was wrong: doublethink is as clear as languag... Everyone remembers Newspeak, the straitjacketed version of English from George Orwell’s novel 1984 (1949). In that dystopia, Newspeak was a language designed by ideological technicians to make politically incorrect thoughts literally inexpressible. Fewer people know that Orwell also worried about the poverty of our ordinary, unregimented vocabulary. Too often, he believed, we lack the words to say exactly what we mean, and so we say something else, something in the general neighbourhood, usually a lot less nuanced than what we had in mind; for example, he observed that ‘all likes and dislikes, all aesthetic feeling, all notions of right and wrong… spring from feelings which are generally admitted to be subtler than words’. His solution was ‘to invent new words as deliberately as we would invent new parts for a motor-car engine’. This, he suggested in an essay titled ‘New Words’ (1940), might be the occupation of ‘several thousands of… people.’

What secrets are hiding in these runes? The top of the Rök runestone. The inscription begins on this side. (Photo: Science Photo Library) What type of writing does the Indus script represent? How, then, is it possible to decipher an unknown system of writing? Confronted with this primary question we are doubly fortunate in comparison to the decipherers of the Egyptian hieroglyphs more than 150 years ago. In the first place, we have a number of successful decipherments to look back to, both as potential models and as sources of inspiration, which reassure us in the indispensable belief that seemingly impossible feats can be achieved. Yet none of the earlier decipherments is directly comparable to the problem of the Indus script: most of them were based on a translation of a text in the unknown script into a known script and language, or at least the historical context provided crucial clues in the form of proper names. In the absence of such aids, we must look for a different approach.

Ten Most Difficult Words to Translate Sometimes even the finest translators come up against words that defy translation. Many languages include words that don’t have a simple counterpart in another language. When translators come across such a word, they usually describe it so that it makes sense in the target language. But some words pose more difficulty than others due to interesting cultural differences. Here are ten words that are particularly difficult to translate:

Deodorant Recipe Thank you for visiting Little House in the Suburbs. Please subscribe and you'll get great simple living tips and how-to articles delivered to your inbox, for free! In the DIY world of home health and beauty products, deodorant seems to be the the most feared replacement. Creating The World's Greatest Anagram "It's supposed to look unlabored." ~ poet Christian Bök on anagrams If the poem above brings you some holiday cheer, know this: Those 56 lines are an anagram of 'Twas The Night Before Christmas. Yes, if you take Clement Parke Moore's famed yuletide poem, pretend the title is "The Night Before Christmas" (it's actually called "A Visit From St. Capital - The secret to stopping your ‘ummms’ You've researched your topic, prepared your speech and dressed the part. But when it comes time to wow your audience, you can tell they are underwhelmed. Could the problem be filler words? Phrases such as “um,” “like,” and “you know” are awkward to listen to and lack authority.

Words in English A Brief History of English, with Chronologyby Suzanne Kemmer © 2001-2005 Pre-English | Old English | Middle English | Modern English The language we call English was first brought to the north sea coasts of England in the 5th and 6th centuries A.D., by seafaring people from Denmark and the northwestern coasts of present-day Germany and the Netherlands. These immigrants spoke a cluster of related dialects falling within the Germanic branch of the Indo-European language family. Their language began to develop its own distinctive features in isolation from the continental Germanic languages, and by 600 A.D. had developed into what we call Old English or Anglo-Saxon, covering the territory of most of modern England. New waves of Germanic invaders and settlers came from Norway and Denmark starting in the late 8th century.

Linguistic Geography of the United States Traditionally, dialectologists have listed three dialect groups in the United States: Northern, Midland, and Southern--although some scholars prefer a two-way classification of simply Northern and Southern, and one may also find significant difference on the boundaries of each area. The map shown above represents a synthesis of various independent field studies this century. These are in chronological order: the Linguistic Atlas fieldwork begun under the direction of Hans Kurath in the 1930's; the informal but extensive personal observations of Charles Thomas in the 1940's; the DARE fieldwork of the 1960's under Frederic Cassidy; and the Phonological Atlas fieldwork of William Labov during the 1990's. Although it may seem that a great amount of data has been collected over a short time span, the shifts in American dialects this century have been rapid enough to outpace the data collection. The New England Dialects The New York Dialects

A Practical Guide to Antibiotics and Their Usage for Survival Preparing for Biological and Chemical Terrorism: A Practical Guide to Antibiotics and Their Usage for Survival by Leonard G. Horowitz, D.M.D., M.A., M.P.H. Tetrahedron, LLC Sandpoint, Idaho Disclaimer and Background A Way with Words To transmit information during wartime, various industries used to encode their messages letter by letter with an elaborate system–a primitive version of today’s digital encryption. Grant breaks down some of those secret codes, and shares the story of the most extensive telegram ever sent. Plus, we’ve all been there: Your friends are on a date, and you’re tagging along. Are you a “third wheel”–or the “fifth wheel”?

About - FOLD What is FOLD? FOLD is an authoring and publishing platform for creating modular, multimedia stories. Authors can search for and add “context cards” to their stories directly within the platform. Context cards can contain everything from videos, maps, tweets, music, interactive visualizations, and more. Can I write a story? Etymologically Speaking... From the old Arabic word "hashshshin," which meant, "someone who is addicted to hash," that is, marijuana. Originally refered to a group of warriors who would smoke up before battle. Aaron White adds: You may want to explore the fact that the hashshshins were somewhat of a voodoo-ized grand conspiracy scapegoat cult (the very fact of their existence is impossible to confirm). They supposedly were a secret society (a la the FreeMasons) which was influential in every middle eastern court from Persia to Bangladesh.

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