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9 Excellent Free Map Creation Tools for Teachers and Students

9 Excellent Free Map Creation Tools for Teachers and Students
1- Umapper UMapper is a great mapping tool for educators. It allows its users to create and manage interactive maps and geogames online. These maps can be shared with others or be embedded in blogs and websites 2- MapTiler This a tool that allows users to create overlay of standard maps like Google Maps, and Yahoo Maps and can also be visualized in 3D form. 3- Build A Map This is another cool tool for teachers to create maps. 4- World Map This one here is being developed by Center for Geographic Analysis at Harvard University and allows users to easily build their own mapping portal and publish it to the world or to just a few collaborators. 5- Map Faire This is a cool tool for teachers to create awesome maps and share them with their students. 6- MapFab This is a Google Maps editor that offers you a clever way to easily create and share your Google Maps . 7- Target Map 8- Scribble Maps This tool allows users to easily draw on maps and then share them with friends and colleagues. 9- Animaps Related:  KortGeografi

Brugstedet.dk 40 Maps That Will Help You Make Sense of the World If you’re a visual learner like myself, then you know maps, charts and infographics can really help bring data and information to life. Maps can make a point resonate with readers and this collection aims to do just that. Hopefully some of these maps will surprise you and you’ll learn something new. A few are important to know, some interpret and display data in a beautiful or creative way, and a few may even make you chuckle or shake your head. If you enjoy this collection of maps, the Sifter highly recommends the r/MapPorn sub reddit. You should also check out ChartsBin.com. 1. 2. 3. 4. Pangea was a supercontinent that existed during the late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic eras, forming about 300 million years ago. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 37. 38. 39. 40. *Bonus* World Map Tattoo with Countries Visited Coloured

<a href=" by Qualaroo</a> Half a million members creating, sharing and exploring great visual content. Join us! Login with Facebookor your e-mail Sign UpLog In Products Start creating, sharing & exploring great visuals today! Sign in with Facebook Which role describes you best? Almost there! Almost there! already has a Visually account, please choose one of the following options Are you ? Ignore Facebook signup and log in with Reset your Visually password Enter your username or e-mail address <a href=" title="Contact us" target="_blank">Questions? Relevant RelevantTrendingRecentViewedFavedCommented Staff Picks Topics AnimalsBusinessComputersEconomyEducationEntertainmentEnvironmentFoodGamingGeographyHealthHistoryHomeHow ToHuman RightsHumorLifestyleLove and SexOlympicsOtherPoliticsScienceSocial MediaSportsTechnologyTransportationTravel AllInfographicVideoInteractivePresentation Blogs By Nation - 2010 added by boostlabs 1 Likes

Michael Pecirno's Minimal Maps Single Out American Land Use Patterns Most maps of the U.S. prioritize metropolitan areas. But "Minimal Maps" single out the nation's forests, crops, and waterbodies. Eighty percent of the U.S. population lives in "urban" areas, a staggering 249,253,271 souls. Yet these folks live in just 3 percent of the country's 2.3 billion acres of land. Most of America's 50 states are forestland (30 percent), pasture and ranges (27 percent), and crops (18 percent), with parks, tundra, and swamps making up the rest. These are statistics that never fail to blow my provincially urban mind—in part, perhaps, because most maps of the country visually prioritize metropolitan areas. But London-based designer Michael Pecirno produces images of America that illuminate all land use patterns, type by type. "[C]orn fields take up 91 million acres of the American landscape," writes Pecirno in an email. All images courtesy of Michael Pecirno.

The #1 reason people die early, in each country You're probably aware that heart disease and cancer are far and away the leading causes of death in America. But globally the picture is more complicated: (Vox / Anand Katakam and Joss Fong) It's worth stressing that "cause of lost years of life" and "cause of death" aren't identical. But that makes the fact that heart disease is the leading cause of lost life in so many countries all the more striking, and indicative of those countries' successes in reducing childhood mortality. On the flipside, the world is getting better in a great number of ways: 15 Stunning Data Visualizations (And What You Can Learn From Them) We’re literally drowning in data. Everyday, 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are created. This is the equivalent of 90% of the world’s information--created in the last two years alone. Now this is what we call “big data.” But where does it come from? Everywhere, from sensors and social media sites to digital images and videos. This is where data visualization comes into the picture. In the hopes of inspiring your own work, we’ve compiled 15 data visualizations that will not only blow your mind, they will also give you a clearer understanding of what makes a good visualization--and what makes a bad one. 1 It is interactive 2 It reveals trends The Year in News is a good example of how an expertly executed data visualization can reveal patterns and trends hiding beneath the surface of mountains of data. 3 It uses animation Ready? 4 It uses real images With so many data visualizations out there nowadays, it can be hard to find a unique angle that hasn’t been explored already. 5 It uses metaphors

EarthViewer 32 maps that will teach you something new about the world EVER THOUGHT TO YOURSELF, “How many smaller countries could you fit into Australia?” Or possibly, “Which countries in the western hemisphere have legit secessionist movements?” Or, perhaps most pressing of all, “Where does it pay best to be a lifeguard?” We live in the age of the map now, so these are no longer questions you have to continue simply wondering about. Maps are spectacular at conveying a lot of information in a simple image. h/t: Thanks to the MapPorn subreddit for being a great resource for both finding maps and for getting criticism and analysis of those maps. The 38 best tools for data visualization It's often said that data is the new world currency, and the web is the exchange bureau through which it's traded. As consumers, we're positively swimming in data; it's everywhere from labels on food packaging design to World Health Organisation reports. As a result, for the designer it's becoming increasingly difficult to present data in a way that stands out from the mass of competing data streams. Get Adobe Creative Cloud One of the best ways to get your message across is to use a visualization to quickly draw attention to the key messages, and by presenting data visually it's also possible to uncover surprising patterns and observations that wouldn't be apparent from looking at stats alone. As author, data journalist and information designer David McCandless said in his TED talk: "By visualizing information, we turn it into a landscape that you can explore with your eyes, a sort of information map. There are many different ways of telling a story, but everything starts with an idea.

Everything Sings - Siglio Press Intro by Ira Glass, essays by Albert Mobilio and Ander Monson, interview by Blake Butler. That a cartographer could set out on a mission that’s so emotional, so personal, so idiosyncratic, was news to me. —IRA GLASS, host of This American Life, from his introduction to Everything Sings. Iconoclastic geographer Denis Wood has created an atlas unlike any other. His joyful subversion of the traditional notions of map making forge new ways of seeing not only this particular place, but also the very nature of place itself. These maps have a traditional rigor, but they also have “fingerprints”—a gamut of subjective arguments about the relationships between social class and cultural rituals, about the neighborhood as “transformer,” about maps’ impermanence and fragility—rejecting the idea that they convey a single, static, objective truth. About Denis Wood

Atlas for a Changing Planet Understanding natural and human systems is an essential first step toward reducing the severity of climate change and adapting to a warmer future. Maps and geographic information systems are the primary tools by which scientists, policymakers, planners, and activists visualize and understand our rapidly changing world. Spatial information informs decisions about how to build a better future. Scroll down or click below to explore a sampling of maps from Esri's ArcGIS Online resource on these themes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Photo by DAVID ILIFF. Tap for details Swipe to explore Tap to get back to the Map Swipe to explore For hundreds of millions of years, carbon has cycled through the Earth and its atmosphere, oceans, and biosphere. Click on the map for details. Source: European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Forests are a carbon sink—they absorb more carbon than they release via photosynthesis. This map features world forests and is derived from Landsat data. Source: Esri, Mark J.

Wind Map An invisible, ancient source of energy surrounds us—energy that powered the first explorations of the world, and that may be a key to the future. This map shows you the delicate tracery of wind flowing over the US. The wind map is a personal art project, not associated with any company. We've done our best to make this as accurate as possible, but can't make any guarantees about the correctness of the data or our software. Please do not use the map or its data to fly a plane, sail a boat, or fight wildfires :-) If the map is missing or seems slow, we recommend the latest Chrome browser. Surface wind data comes from the National Digital Forecast Database. If you're looking for a weather map, or just want more detail on the weather today, see these more traditional maps of temperature and wind.

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