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In India, there's water everywhere, and nowhere

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2020/08/indias-daunting-challenge-there-is-water-everywhere-and-nowhere-feature/

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Is This 'I'm Sorry I'm Late. I Had a Lot To Learn' Protest Sign Real? Rumors are surging in the wake of George Floyd’s death and resulting protests against police violence and racial injustice in the United States. Stay informed. Read our special coverage, contribute to support our mission, and submit any tips or claims you see here. In June 2020, an image supposedly showing a white demonstrator at a Black Lives Matter protest holding a sign reading “I’m Sorry I’m Late. I Had A Lot To Learn” went viral on social media:

Jim Steyer: the man who took on Mark Zuckerberg With more than two billion users Facebook is bigger than Christianity,” says Stanford law professor Jim Steyer. “Their ability to amplify hate speech or white supremacy or racist messages is so extraordinary because of the scale of the platform.” It’s a typically bold statement from the man who set up the Stop Hate for Profit (SHFP) campaign calling on advertisers to withdraw from Facebook for the month of July.

10 Pics Of People Before And After They Were Asked To Smile (New Pics) The Dalai Lama said, "A simple smile. That’s the start of opening your heart and being compassionate to others." Smiles have the ability to change one's whole day, and not only to the one that's smiling, but also to those who see a smile. It's just a simple expression, and yet it may be the most powerful, as it's the most positive one. Smile! Could the pandemic lead to happier times? In January 2018, a Yale University professor named Laurie Santos launched a course, Psychology and the Good Life, which quickly became the most popular class in the institution’s 319-year-history. After 13 years at Yale, in 2016, the 44-year-old had taken charge of one of the university’s residential colleges and had become alarmed by widespread mental illness and stress. She wanted to explain the paradox of why so many students were still suffering, having achieved their dreams of being admitted to Yale and having met society’s definition of success. Santos created the lecture series in a bid to teach her students what really mattered – to help them carve out lives of meaning and contentment.

Hazards of constitutional hardball click 2x In 2005, while bragging about his history of sexual assault, a reality TV host laid out a simple theory of power. “When you’re a star,” Donald Trump explained to Access Hollywood host Billy Bush, “they let you do it.” Fifteen years later, Trump has gone from The Apprentice to the Oval Office, from grabbing women without their consent to picking a woman to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the supreme court. Black Lives Matter pushes Japan to confront racism Image copyright Reuters To many Japanese, racism towards black people has long been considered something that happens in the US or Europe, not at home. But when the death of George Floyd in the US sparked a wave of protests demanding that Black Lives Matter, people in Japan joined in too. The protests and marches in major cities pushed a debate about racism in the country, and whether enough was being done to confront and change things. 'Paper cuts of racism'

A field guide to Trump's dangerous rhetoric All leaders are demagogues. You may not realize this, because we’ve come to associate the word “demagogue” with only dangerous populist leaders. But in Greek, the word just means “leader of the people” (dēmos “the people” + agōgos “leading”). Some demagogues are good, and some are dangerous. 'The Office' Warned Us About Dwight Schrute These are boom times for the lolsob. Watching the news, I sometimes find myself staring at the screen, eyes wide, brain broken, not sure whether to laugh or cry. The farce and tragedy tangle so tightly that it can be hard to tell where one ends and the other begins. How do you make sense, for example, of a leader who, in the midst of a deadly pandemic, muses about the curative powers of bleach? How do you process a president’s attempt to edit a hurricane with a Sharpie? The words, after a while, stop working.

Indigenous People of Siberia Photographed for 'The World in Faces' Ulchi Woman. Ulchsky District, Khabarovsk Krai, Far East, Siberia. © Alexander Khimushin / The World In Faces For the past 9 years, photographer Alexander Khimushin has been traveling the world, visiting 84 different countries. Three years ago, inspired by the idea of documenting remote cultures that are slowly disappearing due to globalization, he began his The World in Faces project. Revealing Photo Series Documents School Lunches Around the World Around 32 million children in the US eat cafeteria food every weekday, and most of these students consume over half their daily calories at school. With this in mind, it's clear that school cafeterias are becoming crucial in the fight against childhood obesity. Sweetgreen–a chain of salad restaurants that runs a Sweetgreen in Schools program to educate kids about healthy eating, fitness, and sustainability–decided to shed light on what constitutes a quality lunch by taking a look at typical school lunches around the world. In this thought-provoking photo series, we can see how our own country stacks up to other nations when it comes to nutritious, delicious school meals. From Italy to Brazil to South Korea, trays are loaded with colorful foods that include fresh fruit, veggies, and yummy-looking entrees. In contrast, the typical, processed lunch for US students could stand to get a menu overhaul.

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