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What is Positive Punishment?

What is Positive Punishment?

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Reinforcement vs. Punishment: What They Are & 12 Examples "Reinforcement is anything that increases the likelihood that a person will exhibit the same behavior again in the future," says licensed psychologist Nicole Beurkens, Ph.D., CNS. "You are aiming to increase a desired behavior such as speaking politely, doing chores, playing nicely with siblings, and so on." And chances are you're likely doing this already in some capacity: You praise your kid for tidying up after themselves, you compliment them after getting good grades in school, you take them out for a treat after hitting a milestone or doing well in an extracurricular. As Pressman tells us, it's simply "giving kids attention for a certain behavior." However, reinforcement can backfire, if done incorrectly.

In a Nutshell Positive punishment is a popular concept in parenting. We'll explain what it is and how you can implement it with six examples. Parenting isn't always a walk in the park, and determining the best way to address your child's inevitable poor behavior can be a tricky line to walk. Techniques like positive punishment and negative reinforcement (two parenting "buzzwords" that you've probably heard a lot already) are just two of the ways parents and child care providers can try to correct a child's behavioral issues.

Punishing a Child Is Effective If Done Correctly TORONTO — While recently published parenting books have preached the effectiveness of positive parenting and “no drama” discipline, psychologists presenting at the American Psychological Association’s 123rd Annual Convention said don’t put timeout in timeout yet. “Parental discipline and positive parenting techniques are often polarized in popular parenting resources and in parenting research conclusions,” presenter and researcher Robert Larzelere, PhD, of Oklahoma State University, said at a symposium. “But scientifically supported parenting interventions for young defiant children have found that timeouts and other types of assertive tactics can work if they’re administered correctly.”

How to Properly Use Reinforcement and Punishment - North Shore Pediatric Therapy Reinforcement and punishment are common terms that most people have heard of and use on a daily basis, whether they realize it or not. Although the concepts seem easy to understand and implement, it can be easy to confuse the basic principles and/or implement them incorrectly. In order to understand the difference between reinforcement and punishment, it is important to understand the definitions of both terms. Reinforcement 3 behavioral techniques for educating children: reinforcement, punishment and extinction Tantrums, crying, screaming, biting, hitting … When it comes to parenting, sometimes we don’t really know how to stop inappropriate behavior. But behavioral techniques can help us to control these and other behaviors. They will also help us to encourage what we consider appropriate behavior. As you can imagine, it will take some effort on our part, but once it gets under way, we’ll see remarkable results … Read on for useful behavioral techniques you can use with your children!

Positive vs Negative Reinforcement: Which Is More Effective? Table of Content: 1. What is Reinforcement? 2. What are the different types of Reinforcement? 3. Punishments vs. Consequences: Teach Your Teen the Difference When I work with parents of teenagers, our conversations inevitably turn toward discipline. “How do get my teen to follow the rules?” “My teen won’t clean up after himself. Why you should stop yelling at your kids The use of spanking to discipline children has been in decline for 50 years. But yelling? Almost everybody still yells at their kids sometimes, even the parents who know it doesn’t work. Yelling may be the most widespread parental stupidity around today. Reinforcement vs. Punishment: Changing BehaviorBehavioral Health Works Being a parent has been known as the best thing ever BUT also the most challenging endeavor you will encounter in your lifetime. Parents strive to raise a healthy and happy child that will one day grow up as a full-fledged mature and independent adult. But to successfully accomplish this goal, a parent must set forth structure or rules throughout their childhood to help them understand and be realigned when their behavior needs to be modified.

Teens May Learn Best with Positive Reinforcement A new study finds that adolescents focus on rewards and are less able to learn to avoid punishment or consider the consequences of alternative actions. University College-London investigators compared how adolescents and adults learn to make choices based on the available information. Investigators tracked the way in which 18 volunteers aged 12-17 and 20 volunteers aged 18-32 completed tasks in which they had to choose between abstract symbols.

Reinforcement vs. Punishment: Changing Behavior Being a parent has been known as the best thing ever BUT also the most challenging endeavor you will encounter in your lifetime. Parents strive to raise a healthy and happy child that will one day grow up as a full-fledged mature and independent adult. But to successfully accomplish this goal, a parent must set forth structure or rules throughout their childhood to help them understand and be realigned when their behavior needs to be modified. When a parent recognizes the need to change a behavior, they will likely end up using either reinforcement, punishment, or a mixture of both.

How Negative Punishment Works Negative punishment is an important concept in B. F. Skinner's theory of operant conditioning. In behavioral psychology, the goal of punishment is to decrease unwanted behavior. In the case of negative punishment, it involves taking something good or desirable away to reduce the occurrence of a particular behavior. One of the easiest ways to remember this concept is to note that in behavioral terms, positive means adding something while negative means taking something away.

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