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How Different Cultures Understand Time

https://www.businessinsider.com/how-different-cultures-understand-time-2014-5

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Webquest: St Patrick's Day: History and traditions What is the history of St Patrick’s Day, and who was he? Find the answers in this webquest, and learn about how 17th March is celebrated around the world. On the 17th March, the whole world becomes Irish. It’s the day we celebrate St Patrick’s Day in honour of Ireland’s patron saint. But who was St Patrick? And how do we celebrate his day? Breathtaking images capture South Africa's striking divide between the rich and the poor The shocking apartheid in South Africa has been brought to light in a series of breathtaking images. Captured by photographer Johnny Miller, the striking collection of photographs reveals the country's prominent lasting divide between the rich and the poor. The snaps, which were taken using a drone, show on one side the larger homes with swimming pools and driveways - and on the other, a series of over-populated neighbourhoods with little space to move. Entitled 'Unequal Scenes', the collection consists of images taken above the likes of the Papwa Sewgolum Golf Course in Durban, Kya Sands in Johannesburg and even Imizamo Yethu - a settlement that houses more than 33,000 residents.

George E. Vaillant's: Aging Well: Surprising Guideposts to a Happier Life from the Landmark Harvard Study of Adult Development George E. Vaillant's "We all need models for how to live from retirement to past 80--with joy," writes George Vaillant, M.D., director of the Harvard Study of Adult Development. This groundbreaking book pulls together data from three separate longevity studies that, beginning in their teens, followed 824 individuals for more than 50 years. The subjects were male Harvard graduates; inner-city, disadvantaged males; and intellectually gifted women. "Here you have these wonderful files, and you seem little interested in how we cope with increasing age ... our adaptability, our zest for life," one of these subjects wrote to Vaillant, a researcher, psychiatrist, and Harvard Medical School professor, about how he was using this information.

Quick lesson – Housemates Speaking lesson – describing people and personalities This activity has been made for a strong intermediate or upper-intermediate class. Below you will find everything you need including the worksheet, full instructions and some additional ideas. Before the lesson print and cut out the worksheet (click here to download). You’ll need one worksheet for every group of four or five students.

Doodle 4 Google: Meet the Winning Artist Akilah Johnson – Heavy.com The winning Google Doodle by Akilah Johnson. (Google) Akilah Johnson, a high school sophomore from Washington, D.C., has been picked as the winner of the 2016 Doodle 4 Google contest, the company announced Monday. Her artwork, titled “Afrocentric life,” is featured on the Google home page. According to Google, she was picked out of 100,000 participants from 50 states, Puerto Rico, Guam and D.C. Why I Hope to Die at 75 - The Atlantic - Pocket Seventy-five. That’s how long I want to live: 75 years. This preference drives my daughters crazy. It drives my brothers crazy. My loving friends think I am crazy.

25 maps that explain the English language English is the language of Shakespeare and the language of Chaucer. It’s spoken in dozens of countries around the world, from the United States to a tiny island named Tristan da Cunha. It reflects the influences of centuries of international exchange, including conquest and colonization, from the Vikings through the 21st century. Here are 25 maps and charts that explain how English got started and evolved into the differently accented languages spoken today. The origins of English 1) Where English comes from

Doodle 4 Google Winner: Teenage ‘Black Lives Matter’ Artist Featured By Google Akilah Johnson, a sophomore in high school, won Google’s “Doodle 4 Google” contest just last month. This morning, her Google Doodle was featured on the world’s most visited page: Google.com. According to the Washington Post, Akilah was “surprised and overwhelmed” when she was told that she was a national finalist in the Doodle 4 Google contest. After receiving the news that she’d won Google’s doodle contest, she said she was overwhelmed with emotion. “I was so excited, I started crying, I didn’t even look at anybody – I was just looking at the framed copy [of the Doodle] they gave me,” Akilah told the Washington Post today. In previous years, the Doodle 4 Google contest had excluded Washington, D.C., from the list of eligible states, but as of this year, Google allowed D.C. to be included.

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