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Wolf and tiger cubs brought together to form a unique bond of endangered species

Wolf and tiger cubs brought together to form a unique bond of endangered species
By Mail Foreign Service Updated: 14:21 GMT, 14 May 2010 In the wild, a chance meeting between a wolf and a tiger would not be this adorable. But, seeing as they were friends since being two weeks old, these litters of wolves and tigers share a unique bond. Separated from their mothers to insure their survival, they are beginning their journey as animal ambassadors at The Institute of Greatly Endangered and Rare Species - conveniently abbreviated to 'Tigers'. The young timber wolves and Bengal tigers seem unaware that they are supposed to be sworn enemies as they play for the cameras in their South Carolina home. On the prowl: Wolf and Tiger cubs play together at Myrtle Beach South Carolina Zoo. Now aged three months, and sharing the same bottles of milk formula, the 25lb wolf cubs are twice the weight of their tiger bedfellows. The founder of Tigers, Doc Bhagavan, said: 'At the moment the tigers will have a size and weight disadvantage to their canine friends.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1278441/Wolf-tiger-cubs-brought-form-unique-bond-endangered-species.html

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