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The One Thing We Should Always Remember About Donald Trump

The One Thing We Should Always Remember About Donald Trump
In this web exclusive, Bill Moyers and four historians dissect the big lie Trump rode to power: the Birther lie. Nell Painter, historian and Edwards Professor of American History, Emerita, at Princeton University; Khalil Gibran Muhammad, professor of history, race and public policy at Harvard Kennedy School; Christopher Lebron, assistant professor of African-American studies and philosophy at Yale University; and Philip Klinkner, James S. Sherman Professor of Government, Hamilton College discuss the fertile ground on which the birther lie was sown: our nation’s history of white supremacy. Credits: Gail Ablow, Producer; Sikay Tang, Editor BILL MOYERS: I’m Bill Moyers. The most important thing to remember about Donald Trump is that he was the same man at 12:01 p.m. What’s different is that in those two minutes Donald Trump was handed the most awesome power imaginable. LOU DOBBS (CNN 7/21/09): Up next, the issue that won’t go away: the matter of President Obama and that birth certificate.

http://billmoyers.com/story/lest-we-forget/

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Russian Election Hacking Efforts, Wider Than Previously Known, Draw Little Scrutiny - The New York Times But months later, for Ms. Greenhalgh, other election security experts and some state officials, questions still linger about what happened that day in Durham as well as other counties in North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and Arizona. After a presidential campaign scarred by Russian meddling, local, state and federal agencies have conducted little of the type of digital forensic investigation required to assess the impact, if any, on voting in at least 21 states whose election systems were targeted by Russian hackers, according to interviews with nearly two dozen national security and state officials and election technology specialists.

White House Acknowledges Trump Ties To Stormy Legal Battle Over Alleged Affair White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders fielded questions from reporters about an alleged affair between the president and a former adult film actress. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption toggle caption Susan Walsh/AP White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders fielded questions from reporters about an alleged affair between the president and a former adult film actress. On Wednesday, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders was fielding questions on steel and aluminium tariffs and on an abnormal exodus of White House staffers. FactChecking Trump's Energy Boasts click 2x At a meeting on hurricane preparedness, President Donald Trump took credit for U.S. energy production milestones that have been expected for years, and misstated the facts in the process: Trump said the U.S. is now “the largest energy producer in the world. Who would have thought?”

Your US fake news for $ from Macedonia In the weeks following the 2016 presidential election, pundits, politicians and tech titans all sought to figure out whether fake news had affected the outcome. Hillary Clinton publicly castigated the "guys over in Macedonia who are running these fake news sites," and suggested they may have been working with Russia. The New Yorker reported that President Obama spent a day after Trump's victory talking "almost obsessively" with advisers about the stories coming out of Veles. Donald Trump is wrong about wage trends Before meeting with his Cabinet, President Donald Trump held court with the reporters assembled at the White House. Among other topics, Trump discussed some of the economic achievements on his watch: "Wages are rising at the fastest pace in more than a decade, something that people have been waiting for, as you know.

The health impact of separating migrant children from parents Media playback is unsupported on your device Paediatric and child trauma experts are sounding the alarm that separating migrant children from their parents at the US border can cause serious physical and psychological damage. As more stories emerge about children being separated from their parents at the border between Mexico and the US, doctors and scientists are warning that there could be long-term, irreversible health impacts on children if they're not swiftly reunited. The head of the American Academy of Pediatrics went so far as to call the policy "child abuse" and against "everything we stand for as paediatricians". "This is completely ridiculous and I'm approaching that not as someone who's taking a position in the politics, but as a scientist," says Charles A Nelson III, a professor of paediatrics and neuroscience at Harvard Medical School.

Americans in danger of losing 640m acres of national land The rancher came roaring up on a four-wheeler. “Hey, you,” he shouted. “You’re trespassing!” Stormy Daniels Offers To Pay Back 'Hush Money' To Speak About Alleged Trump Affair Actress Stormy Daniels, whose legal name is Stephanie Clifford, is offering to return what she calls "hush money" to President Trump in exchange for the right to speak freely about their alleged affair. Charley Gallay/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Charley Gallay/Getty Images Actress Stormy Daniels, whose legal name is Stephanie Clifford, is offering to return what she calls "hush money" to President Trump in exchange for the right to speak freely about their alleged affair. Updated at 5:10 p.m.

I’ve Been Reporting on MS-13 for a Year. Here Are the 5 There’s one thing everyone can agree with President Donald Trump on about the street gang MS-13: The group specializes in spectacular violence. Its members attack in groups, in the woods, at night, luring teens to their deaths with the promise of girls or weed. One Long Island boy told me he doesn’t go to parties anymore because he worries any invitation could be a trap. A victim’s father showed me a death certificate that said his son’s head had been bashed in, then lowered his voice and added that the boy’s bones had been marked by machete slashes, but he didn’t want the mother to know that. A teenager who has left the gang told me he considers himself dead already, and is just trying to make sure MS-13 doesn’t kill his family.

The Republican Tax Bill Is a Poison Pill That Kills the New Deal President Hoover signing the Farm-Relief Bill at the White House on June 15, 1929, providing for a $500,000,000 revolving fund to stabilize agriculture and stimulate cooperative marketing. Joining him are (left to right): Sen. Charles L. McNary (R-OR), Vice President Charles Curtis, Speaker of the House Nicholas Longworth (R-OH) and Rep. Trump Org: a magnet for dirty businessmen By Inti Pacheco, Manuela Andreoni, Alex Mierjeski and Keenan Chen In late 1997, Donald Trump was beginning to bounce back from near financial ruin. Two years earlier, his financial losses had totaled $916 million following a string of bankruptcies at Trump casinos and other properties earlier in the decade, according to tax records published in late 2016. But then, Trump stumbled upon a deal that would change the course of his real estate business.

Donald Trump off-base in describing GDP growth on his watch During a June 28 visit to Mount Pleasant, Wis. -- the site of a planned Foxconn manufacturing facility -- President Donald Trump touted his economic record, including the growth of the nation’s gross domestic product, which measures the size of the economy. "Watch those GDP numbers," Trump said. "We started off at a very low number, and right now we hit a 3.2," or 3.2 percentage growth compared to the last quarter on an annualized basis.

World's richest 1% grabbed 82% of all wealth created in 2017, Oxfam study finds - Jan. 21, 2018 That's according to a new report from Oxfam International, which estimates that the bottom 50% of the world's population saw no increase in wealth. Oxfam says the trend shows that the global economy is skewed in favor of the rich, rewarding wealth instead of work. "The billionaire boom is not a sign of a thriving economy but a symptom of a failing economic system," said Winnie Byanyima, executive director of Oxfam International. The head of the advocacy group argued that the people who "make our clothes, assemble our phones and grow our food" are being exploited in order to enrich corporations and the super wealthy.

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