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English Grammar Lessons for Teachers and Students

English Grammar Lessons for Teachers and Students

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5 TED-Ed Lessons for book lovers When did novels stop being novel? Do comic books belong in school? How do you make a pop-up book, anyway? ESL Song Lessons - tefltunes.com - Songs For Teaching Grammar ESL and EFL teachers looking for inspiration for lesson planning will find this list of songs to teach English grammar we’ve compiled a useful resource. Highlighted are songs available as complete ESL song lesson plans here on tefltunes.com. Songs for teaching present simple Eric Clapton / Wonderful Tonight (lyrics) The Beatles / She Loves You (lyrics) Bette Middler / From A Distance (lyrics) Songs for teaching present continuous Rod Stewart / Sailing (lyrics) Fool’s Garden / Lemon Tree (lyrics) Suzanne Vega / Tom’s Diner (lyrics)

How to use songs in the English language classroom What makes for a successful song-based lesson? Adam Simpson, second-time winner of the British Council’s Teaching English blog award for his post on conditionals (written with Paul Mains), explains. One of the big problems we all face, whether teaching English to children or adults, is maintaining learners’ interest throughout our lessons. Consequently, we often have to be very creative in the techniques we use.

London One of the world's most visited cities, London has something for everyone: from history and culture to fine food and good times. A Tale of Two Cities London is as much about wide-open spaces and leafy escapes as it is high-density, sight-packed exploration. Central London is where you will find the major museums, galleries and most iconic sights, but visit Hampstead Heath or the new Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park to escape the crowds and view the city’s greener hues up close. Or venture even further out to Kew Gardens, Richmond or Hampton Court Palace for excellent panoramas of riverside London. Diversity

Passive voice To learn Passive voice it is necessary to know the past participles. If you do not know the past participles go to our post on Past participle and learn the irregular verbs first. Once you do not have any problems with past participles, it is time to learn the Passive voice in English.Passive voice is used if the subject (the thing before the verb) does not do the action described by the verb. Then you have to insert the verb “TO BE” in the correct form in front of the verb in past participle.

Oxford City Council praised for introducing gender neutral 'MX' title on paperwork One of the country’s biggest councils has been praised for introducing gender neutral titles on forms. Oxford City Council told The Independent it has approved plans to include ‘Mx’ as an option on paperwork, alongside traditional terms such as Miss, Ms, Mrs and Mr. The change was made following recommendations from the council’s Equality and Diversity Group as a means of making the council more trans-inclusive; including non-binary people who can prefer the ‘Mx’ title as it does not denote a gender. Councillor Tom Haynes, Vice-Chair of Oxford City Council Scrutiny Committee told The Independent: “The council’s workforce has been changing to look more like the diverse communities that it serves. Good policies have helped to bring this about and tackle discrimination but further improvements are possible.

Irregular Past Tense Verbs – word lists, worksheets, activities, goals, and more Irregular past tense verb list in developmental order Functional ate, bit, blew, broke, built, caught, came, cut, did, drew, drank, fell, flew, found, got, gave, had, let, lost, made, put, read, ran, said, saw, sat, stood, stuck, told, took, threw, went, woke, won, wore, wrote, was Later Developing began, brought, became, bought, burnt, chose, dove, drove, dug, felt, fit, fought, forgot, grew, hung, hid, hit, held, hurt, kept, knew, laid, left, met, paid, quit, rode, rang, sank, set, shook, shrank, sang, shot, shut, slept, slid, sold, spoke, spun, stole, stung, struck, swept, swore, swam, swung, tore, taught, thought

Free Reading Worksheets Ereading Worksheets has the best reading worksheets on the internet, and they’re all free. These worksheets are skill focused and aligned to Common Core State Standards. You are free to save, edit, and print these worksheets for personal or classroom use. Many of these assignments can now be completed online. You’re going to like this. Fictional Passages

Great Britain: Every quirky fact you need to know Pom or Pommy: Used in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. The origin is unknown, although the strongest theory is that it's a contraction of pomegranate which was Australian rhyming slang for immigrant. Sassenach: Used by the Scots and Irish to describe the English. The term is derived from the Scottish Gaelic for Saxon. Les goddams: A historic term of abuse coined by the French to denote the English, who were notorious for frequent swearing (God damn!) Countable and uncountable nouns This topic is connected with countable and uncountable nouns. When I speak with native speakers of English they often tell me that the concept of countability in English is absolutely natural. “You simply know which noun is countable and which is not.” However, this natural feeling is nearly impossible to teach. Based on my experience I have created the following mind map where I try to set some rules to help the learners of English.

Murder in the Classroom - Murder Mystery Game - Education of 21 Share Murder in the Classroom - Murder Mystery Game Description This is an activity for the ESL classroom though it can alo be used in other contexts. The slide deck is adapted from “Murder in the the Classroom” a lesson plan on One Stop English and you can find that via the link below. BATTLESHIP: IRREGULAR VERBS Much to learn, you still have. – Joda. Despite the evidence that the number of irregular verbs is declining in the English language, there is no danger they will disappear, and the struggle will continue. There are many attempts to find a shortcut in learning irregular verbs, yet with all the options and “magic tricks” available, learning these verbs requires much memorization, drilling and practice. Today I will show how I use the Battleship game to drill and practise irregular verbs in a fun way. Before the game: Each player will need two 10×10 grids – one with irregular verbs in each square, and one blank grid.

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