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Terrapattern

Terrapattern

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Using GIS to Form Resilient Public Health Plans As Negative Health Effects from Climate Change Grow, Sophisticated Technology Will Guide Preparation By Alex Philp, PhD, Upstream Research, Inc. The earth's climate is changing, and this will have a tremendous impact on human health. Visualising Networks Part 1: A Critique This is the first post of a series on network visualisation. Thanks to the facilitated access to network analysis tools and the growing interest in many disciplines towards studying the relations structuring datasets, networks have become ubiquitous objects in science, in newspapers, on tech book covers, all over the Web, and to illustrate anything big data-related (hand in hand with word clouds.). Unfortunately, the resort to networks has reached a point where in a conference I heard a speaker say: “Since this is mandatory, here is a network visualisation of these data. Sorry if you cannot see anything in this big hairball

Technology: Use or lose our navigation skills Paul Grogan/PhotoPlus Magazine via Getty Images The paths of vehicles along Regent Street in London, revealed by long-exposure photography. In 1984, I was part of a team that was developing a receiver for a satellite-navigation system. After weeks of debugging, the blur of random digits settled on a location. We grabbed a map and plotted the point. The pencilled cross landed exactly on the building that we were in. One Chart, Twelve Tools · Lisa Charlotte Rost 17 May 2016 Which tool or charting framework do you use to visualize data? Everybody I’ve met so far has personal preferences (“I got introduced to data vis with that tool!” Googler Turns Censored Images Into Meta Art Google's Street View-style cameras are giving Googlers one more thing to ogle at. That's right, not just the great outdoors — now you can scope out museums, too. With the Google Art Project, you can take a gallery or collection tour and peruse through more than 45,000 pieces of art by approximately 10,000 artists.

Esri Launches National Green Infrastructure Initiative for Planning Esri, the world leader in geographic information system (GIS) technology, has launched a suite of public mapping tools and data to help communities protect the places and natural resources that help people, wildlife, and the economy thrive. Leading the Green Infrastructure for the U.S. initiative, Esri has partnered with National Geographic Society to transform how U.S. communities plan development. By equipping local, regional, and urban municipalities with data and GIS tools, Esri president Jack Dangermond envisions communities working together to build a green infrastructure—a strategically managed network of open spaces, watersheds, wildlife habitats, parks and other areas that deliver vital services and enrich quality of life. With Esri’s green infrastructure planning tools, communities can identify, protect, and connect local places of natural and cultural significance before development occurs.

Talk: How to Visualize Data Last week, I gave one of the visualization primer talks at BioVis in Dublin. My goal was to show people some examples, but also criticize the rather poor visualization culture in bioinformatics and challenge people to do better. Here is a write-up of that talk. Seán O’Donoghue introduced me by calling me “infamous” for speaking my mind and criticizing things, which was the perfect setup for my talk. I had originally planned a more academic talk about data mapping etc., but I think this will have more impact in the end. Also, it was more fun to prepare and deliver.

Artist Turns the Google Art Project’s Blurry Canvases Into Hazy Abstract Paintings “The internet provides a huge amount of material which otherwise would be unattainable to most people,” the artist told Wired. “It has led to a lot of creativity — whether it is with memes or highly skilled photoshop jobs — everyone is now able to create and edit images.” Thompson has also dealt with copyright law in other projects dealing, like the “Getty Oil Paintings” project, from last year, in which he appropriated and republished images of paintings like Matisse‘s “The Dance,” from the Getty Images photo bank that have the “Getty Images” logo superimposed over them as a watermark to ward off unwanted usage. Thompson’s work consistently deals with the ways in which classic art forms can be reproduced, recycled, and distorted by technology, in manner that harkens back to the “Pictures” work for a New Aesthetic generation.

Beyond the sea By Andy Woodruff on 24 March 2016 In the northern reaches of Newfoundland, near the town of St. Anthony, is the Fox Point Lighthouse. I’ve never been there, but I know it has one of the most impressive ocean views in the world. If you face perpendicular to the right bit of rocky coastline there and gaze straight across the ocean, your mind’s eye peering well beyond the horizon, you can see all the way to Australia. How to Find the Right Chart Type for your Numeric Data 22 Feb 2016 Charts help you visualize numeric data in a graphical format but the problem is there are just too many types of charts to choose from. This diagram will help you pick the right chart for your data type.

Google's Copyright Policy Spawns Mega-Meta Art From China The Google Art Project allows art enthusiasts to visit distant museums online by scanning them with the same 15-lens camera rigs used by Google Street View. Due to copyright restrictions, however, certain paintings needed to be blurred, just like faces are in GSV. British artist Phil Thompson was intrigued by the foggy interruptions. His project Copyrights is his exploration of Google’s grand, utopian exercise in bringing culture to the masses. For it, Thompson makes screen grabs of the blurred images in his browser window, sends them to the Dafen Oil Painting Village in China (a company that makes acrylic paintings of absolutely anything to order) and then exhibits those works in a gallery. “I am really interested in glitches; the moments when things fail and reveal themselves,” says Thompson.

Why Google Maps gets Africa wrong About halfway through Jonathan Swift's boisterously witty epic poem On Poetry: A Rhapsody, the 18th century Anglo-Irish satirist briefly turns his attention to maps of Africa, writing: So geographers, in Afric maps,With savage pictures fill their gaps,And o'er uninhabitable downsPlace elephants for want of towns. In Swift's time, European explorers had only skirted around the coastal edges of Africa and its interior remained, to all intents and purposes, a mystery. Learning to See Data “The problem today is that biological data are often abstracted into the digital domain,” Dr. Greally added, “and we need some way to capture the gestalt, to develop an instinct for what’s important.” And so it is in many fields, whether predicting climate, flagging potential terrorists or making economic forecasts.

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