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5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos

5 tips to improve your critical thinking - Samantha Agoos
History of Critical Thinking “The intellectual roots of critical thinking are as ancient as its etymology, traceable, ultimately, to the teaching practice and vision of Socrates 2,500 years ago who discovered by a method of probing questioning that people could not rationally justify their confident claims to knowledge. Confused meanings, inadequate evidence, or self-contradictory beliefs often lurked beneath smooth but largely empty rhetoric.” “He [Socrates] established the importance of seeking evidence, closely examining reasoning and assumptions, analyzing basic concepts, and tracing out implications not only of what is said but of what is done as well. His method of questioning is now known as "Socratic Questioning" and is the best known critical thinking teaching strategy. In his mode of questioning, Socrates highlighted the need in thinking for clarity and logical consistency.” More on critical thinking through the ages is available here. 1.

http://ed.ted.com/lessons/5-tips-to-improve-your-critical-thinking-samantha-agoos

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Planning For Critical Thinking: A 5-Step Model Planning For Critical Thinking: A 5-Step Model Like anything else that you’d like to see happen in your classroom, promoting critical thinking skills is a matter of planning and priority. While teachers are often admonished to push students towards higher-level thinking activities, beyond Bloom’s Taxonomy (or one of TeachThought’s own learning taxonomies), there are precious few models and frameworks that are accessible, comprehensive, or universal enough to be used on a daily basis. In was in that light that we found the above model by Duran, Limbach, and Waugh (2006) useful. And better yet, it (more or less) parallels Hunter’s basic lesson design that has been used for years as a model for lesson planning, making it far more accessible to most K-12 teachers without having to shoehorn yet another “thing” in.

How do you know you exist? - James Zucker René Descartes believed that most of what he acquired and learned came from the senses, but his senses had deceived him in the past. Can you give an example of when your senses have deceived you? Is there an experience that has made you doubt what you have seen or heard? Could this give you reason to doubt EVERYTHING you have learned from your senses? Check out this video for some background on this idea or watch the TED-Ed Lesson How Optical Illusions Trick Your Brain for one example of how and why your mind can be tricked into seeing something differently than it is.

7 Key Characteristics Of Better Learning Feedback 7 Key Characteristics Of Better Learning Feedback by Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education On May 26, 2015, Grant Wiggins passed away. 12 Strategies For Creating An Atmosphere Of Problem-Solving In Your Classroom - 12 Strategies For Creating An Atmosphere Of Problem-Solving In Your Classroom by Paul Moss To remedy the situation, and grow fruitful and happy students within the confines of the syllabus you are bound to, start to fix the problem yourself by creating an atmosphere of problem-solving in your classes. Create situations where students have to think for themselves. Plato’s Allegory of the Cave - Alex Gendler Want to read the Allegory of the Cave in its complete format? Go to this site and get started. To better understand the allegory’s larger context, try reading the rest of The Republic by Plato and these classic lectures. Then, check out this modern scientific interpretation of what it tells us about human knowledge.

5 Common Misconceptions About Bloom's Taxonomy 5 Common Misconceptions About Bloom’s Taxonomy by Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education Admit it–you only read the list of the six levels of the Taxonomy, not the whole book that explains each level and the rationale behind the Taxonomy. 249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking Bloom’s Taxonomy’s verbs–also know as power verbs or thinking verbs–are extraordinarily powerful instructional planning tools. In fact, next to the concept of backwards-design and power standards, they are likely the most useful tool a teacher-as-learning-designer has access to. Why? They can be used for curriculum mapping, assessment design, lesson planning, personalizing and differentiating learning, and almost any other “thing” a teacher–or student–has to do.

Rethinking thinking - Trevor Maber An excellent way to better understand the Ladder of Inference is to work in a small group and talk about a pattern of behavior that everyone can relate to. Some examples (in addition to the parking lot example) include: someone cutting in front of you in a line at the store; a friend or family member who is always annoyingly late; or someone who leaves you disappointed because he/she breaks more promises than he/she keeps. As you each share your experience, focus on what assumptions are at play, the conclusions you are each drawing from those assumptions, and what emotions you feel as a result.

kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram David Kolb's learning styles model and experiential learning theory (ELT) Having developed the model over many years prior, David Kolb published his learning styles model in 1984. The model gave rise to related terms such as Kolb's experiential learning theory (ELT), and Kolb's learning styles inventory (LSI). In his publications - notably his 1984 book 'Experiential Learning: Experience As The Source Of Learning And Development' Kolb acknowledges the early work on experiential learning by others in the 1900's, including Rogers, Jung, and Piaget. In turn, Kolb's learning styles model and experiential learning theory are today acknowledged by academics, teachers, managers and trainers as truly seminal works; fundamental concepts towards our understanding and explaining human learning behaviour, and towards helping others to learn.

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