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Social networking service

Social networking service
A social networking service (also social networking site or SNS) is a platform to build social networks or social relations among people who share interests, activities, backgrounds or real-life connections. A social network service consists of a representation of each user (often a profile), his or her social links, and a variety of additional services. Social network sites are web-based services that allow individuals to create a public profile, to create a list of users with whom to share connections, and view and cross the connections within the system.[1] Most social network services are web-based and provide means for users to interact over the Internet, such as e-mail and instant messaging. §History[edit] The most popular social networking sites by country Early social networking on the World Wide Web began in the form of generalized online communities such as Theglobe.com (1995),[15] Geocities (1994) and Tripod.com (1995). §Social impact[edit] §Features[edit] §Emerging trends[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_networking_service

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Feedly §History[edit] In November, 2006, Edwin Khodabakchian co-founded DevHD.[3] The company seeks to create a platform that uses RSS feeds, online storage, and social media integration to connect users with the information they find interesting.[3] DevHD’s first project, Streets, which aggregates updates from a variety of online sources is the basis of Feedly. Feedly, which was optimized for RSS feeds, was first released on June 15, 2008.[3] Originally called Feeddo, Feedly was first released as a web extension before moving onto mobile platforms.[4] On March 15, 2013, Feedly announced 500,000 new users in 48 hours due to the closure announcement of Google Reader.[5] By April 2, 2013, the total number of new users was up to 3 million.[6] At the end of May 2013, the total user number was up to 12 million.[7]

Social network Social networks and the analysis of them is an inherently interdisciplinary academic field which emerged from social psychology, sociology, statistics, and graph theory. Georg Simmel authored early structural theories in sociology emphasizing the dynamics of triads and "web of group affiliations."[2] Jacob Moreno is credited with developing the first sociograms in the 1930s to study interpersonal relationships.

Gary Hamel on Managing Generation Y - the Facebook Generation - Gary Hamel’s Management 2.0 ByGary Hamel The experience of growing up online will profoundly shape the workplace expectations of “Generation F” – the Facebook Generation. At a minimum, they’ll expect the social environment of work to reflect the social context of the Web, rather than as is currently the case, a mid-20th-century Weberian bureaucracy. Social Networking Networks get things done. Whether it's sending a letter or lighting your home. Networks make it happen. To get from Chicago to Santa Fe, we need to see the network of roads that will get us there. SlideShare The website gets an estimated 58 million unique visitors a month,[7] and has about 16 million registered users.[citation needed] SlideShare was voted among the World's Top 10 tools for education & e-learning in 2010.[8][9] SlideShare's biggest competitors include Scribd.com, Issuu and Docstoc. Some of the notable users of SlideShare include The White House, NASA, World Economic Forum, State of Utah, O'Reilly Media, Hewlett Packard and IBM. §Zipcasts[edit] In February 2011 SlideShare added a feature called Zipcasts.[10] A Zipcast is a social web conferencing system that allows presenters to broadcast an audio/video feed while driving the presentation through the Internet.

Social graph This animation shows the different types of relations between social objects. User Eva is a friend of Adam and Kate, though Adam and Kate are not friends themselves. Peter's photo was "liked" by many users, including Eva. Also Eva listened to the Last.fm radio and watched the video from Youtube. The term was popularized at the Facebook F8 conference on May 24, 2007, when it was used to explain that the Facebook Platform, which was introduced at the same time, would benefit from the social graph by taking advantage of the relationships between individuals, that Facebook provides, to offer a richer online experience.[2] The definition has been expanded to refer to a social graph of all Internet users. One of the earliest known forms of the social graph was created in 2002 by Harvard student Philippe Bouzaglou in a paper published on the Harvard Department of Economics website.

Connectivism Connectivism is a hypothesis of learning which emphasizes the role of social and cultural context. Connectivism is often associated with and proposes a perspective similar to Vygotsky's 'zone of proximal development' (ZPD), an idea later transposed into Engeström's (2001) Activity theory.[1] The relationship between work experience, learning, and knowledge, as expressed in the concept of ‘connectivity, is central to connectivism, motivating the theory's name.[2] It is somewhat similar to Bandura's Social Learning Theory that proposes that people learn through contact. The phrase "a learning theory for the digital age"[3] indicates the emphasis that connectivism gives to technology's effect on how people live, communicate and learn. Nodes and links[edit] The central aspect of connectivism is the metaphor of a network with nodes and connections.[4] In this metaphor, a node is anything that can be connected to another node such as an organization, information, data, feelings, and images.

Should a Christian use social networking tools (Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, blogs, etc.)? Question: "Should a Christian use social networking tools (Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, blogs, etc.)?" Answer: Hundreds of millions of people are running toward social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter to participate in the relational components of the Internet. Are these networks the next big mission field or an enormous waste of time? Should a Christian participate in social networking?

Pearltrees Pearltrees refers to itself as "a place for your interests".[8] Functionally the product is a visual and collaborative curation tool[9][10][11][12] that allows users to organize, explore and share any URL they find online as well as to upload personal photos, files and notes.[13] The product features a unique visual interface[14][15] that allows users to drag and organize collected URLs, and other digital objects.[16] that themselves can be further organized into collections and sub-collections,[17] (URLs). Users of the product can also engage in social/collaborative curation using a feature called Pearltrees Teams.[18] Pearltrees was founded by Patrice Lamothe, CEO,[22] Alain Cohen, CTO,[23] Nicolas Cynober, Technical Director,[24] Samuel Tissier, Ergonomy/UI[25] and Francois Rocaboy, CMO.[26] History[edit] Development of Pearltrees began in 2007.

List of social networking websites This is a list of major active social networking websites and excludes dating websites (see Comparison of online dating websites). For defunct social networking websites, see List of defunct social networking websites. This list is not exhaustive, and is limited to notable, well-known sites. The Alexa website rankings are from various time periods.

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